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Tool Talk

schlitzaugen

1000+ Posts
Carbide can be sharpened on a silicone carbide (green) grinder wheel. It is not going to look as nice as sharpening on a diamond wheel but it will be sharp. If using a diamond wheel, you need a slow grinder (a few hundred RPM) not a "normal" grinder (about 3000RPM).

You can also use a small diamond lap to sharpen the tip, but these are not cheap. A cheap diamond wheel from China will also do the job (but you need a slow grinder).

Like Jo says, you also need a slow, powerful drill to go through, as slow as you can find one.

Do be careful with carbide dust.
 
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bob

1000+ Posts
Thanks Jo,
my thoughts also. Doing the final hole was a lot easier using the Aldi 6mm first until it's point made it to the bottom of the tile, then followed up with the 8mm and an ancient 10mm masonry that WASN'T a chisel point.
I see that these flat blade style are available at much higher quality, Sutton as you mention, Bosch also has a couple of grades. At double the money there is Alpen brand from Sydneytools, again a couple of grades.
Although these are cheaper than that stuff, they certainly look the part....
https://www.smithandarrow.com.au/pr...m-8mm-10mm-12mm-tile-glass-ceramic-drill-bit/
I also found that the Dremel gray stone tones up the old carbide... :)
The old Hitachi gives nice control - much better than the Bosch blue....
cheers,
Bob
 

Shoji

Renault 17 TL 1312
After marking out with masking tape, I then tap the surface with a centre punch. This breaks the glazing and makes it easier for the first drill size. Fresh bits are always best, but I have been using the cheap craftright brand from bunners with fairly good results. I drill with no hammer function to get started. Always drill last hole size slowly for the plug to grip. Bit of 30 min. polyethylane foaming glue never goes astray. Porcelain tiles are a pain.
 
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bob

1000+ Posts
As long as common sense is applied, like not trying to drill a 6mm hole in a 4mm grout line, there is no reason why 100% of your attempts should not turn out successful. Obviously the closer to the edge of the tile, the less likely chance of success.
G'day Jo,
interestingly, on mortar lines, running cables for an outside light I needed a slightly bigger hole than the mortar width, of course - and, accordingly, suffered your mentioned drama with a two flute drill... :(
The same hole attempted with a four flute was an instant success... which suggests that the offering from Aims Industrial could prove very useful.
cheers,
Bob
 

Kenfuego

1000+ Posts
My first thought was that looks like a job for a diamond cutter, and quickly found this:
https://www.bunnings.com.au/p-n-6mm-diamond-core-drill-bit_p5710032

The comments are positive, and it looks suitable for drilling on the grout lines.

I am surprised that the spade bits actually cut into ceramic, but obviously they do.

Cheers.
I agree with using a diamond tipped tool, easy cut less pressure, though I have had success using the spade drills on glass and ceramic, just proceed with as little pressure as possible and yes suitable lubricants are essential. If you are doing a lot of tiling or restoring tiled bathrooms a small diamond tipped tile cutter is heaps better than the old score and break tile cutters. They are so cheap these days, just make sure the cutting wheels have a generous coating of industrial diamond where you need them. The larger tap size diamond cutters do a great job too.

That Diamond tile cutter was almost my first use of Chinese manufactured tooling and successful, I don't think mine will ever wear out even though it has done a power of work.

Ken.
 

robmac

1000+ Posts
G'day Jo,
interestingly, on mortar lines, running cables for an outside light I needed a slightly bigger hole than the mortar width, of course - and, accordingly, suffered your mentioned drama with a two flute drill... :(
The same hole attempted with a four flute was an instant success... which suggests that the offering from Aims Industrial could prove very useful.
cheers,
Bob

Use an angle grinder with a diamond grit blade. A squirt bottle full of water is fine for cooling.

We used this combo exclusively for chasing brick and masonry. We found it worked better than the purpose built chasing tool with less mess and damage.
 

jo proffi

1000+ Posts
My first thought was that looks like a job for a diamond cutter, and quickly found this:
https://www.bunnings.com.au/p-n-6mm-diamond-core-drill-bit_p5710032

The comments are positive, and it looks suitable for drilling on the grout lines.

I am surprised that the spade bits actually cut into ceramic, but obviously they do.

Cheers.
2 things with that core drill... It is a two person job and it makes a frigging mess.
Dry powder on say a travertine stone floor is one thing but wet slurry is a whole different level of grief.
Not to mention, I don't want slurry anywhere near my expensive driver.
I've used them (as a trades assistant) and apart from having a high burnout rate and being very expensive, require a lot more effort to get right.
When drilling a decent sized hole, say 100mm there is nothing better than a diamond core drill, but at 6mm, I think they are overkill.

Jo
 
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Fordman

1000+ Posts
2 things with that core drill... It is a two person job and it makes a frigging mess.
Dry powder on say a travertine stone floor is one thing but wet slurry is a whole different level of grief.
Not to mention, I don't want slurry anywhere near my expensive driver.
I've used them (as a trades assistant) and apart from having a high burnout rate and being very expensive, require a lot more effort to get right.
When drilling a decent sized hole, say 100mm there is nothing better than a diamond core drill, but at 6mm, I think they are overkill.

Jo
I've used neither, but I am learning from this thread. I would have thought that anything other than a round grinding type action would just crack a ceramic tile, but it appears the 2 blade, and preferably the 4 blade spade tips do a good job, so I know what to get if I need to drill a hole in a tile, something I have always avoided.
Cheers.
 

Fordman

1000+ Posts
a sure recipe for an event..... :)

Bob
Exactly - so next time the missus says she would like a hand grip mounted in the shower recess I won't brush it off like I have in the past! (Nah, can't do that, might crack the tiles!).
Cheers.
 

bob

1000+ Posts
here's the masport 5 ton axe at play. This wood is green, 30-40% and more moisture levels...

DSC_0674 c.jpg
DSC_0675 c.jpg


Bob
 

bob

1000+ Posts
G'day Jo,
looks a similar size to the Masport [5t 1500W] but the wood he's playing with is woosy stuff, lovely straight grain, not like gum trees with their knarled grain structure. The Masport has a two way splitter head adapter but there is no way it would drive a stick through it, well, not gum tree !! Across the growth rings they fight you all the way, hanging on across the split. With the growth rings they get to the split point with a BANG and usually fly off the splitter several feet, SWMBO stands well clear... :)
On the splitter machine, I note that he has made access difficult - the Masport needs to be stood on end to top up the oil. His looks similar at that end, hope he hasn't been too clever... :)
One of the better 'garden tools' we've gotten over the years, it splits stuff that the axe style hand splitter bounces off, very satisfying.... :headbanger"
cheers,
Bob
 

jo proffi

1000+ Posts
Yes, Euro/American wood looks nice and regular, and probably not quite as difficult to work as Ironbark.

Whilst I was getting inspiration for my firewood shelf last year, I discovered you can actually buy 'display grade'logs (birch etc) to stack inside just for the sake of having that photo shoot look in your house. At the price they command, you'd not want to be burning them!!

I quite like the mangled iron bark look though.

Jo
 

DoubleChevron

Real cars have hydraulics
i've got one of the kings ultimate tooks kits in the back of my car ...... the tools are remarkably good quality for what they are. Usually $89 online + postage for the kit (or $110 from the local store).

https://www.4wdsupacentre.com.au/ad...bush-mechanic-illuminator-led-head-torch.html

facebook is telling me these tool kits are on special today for $110 including delivery. An excellent tool kit just leave in your cars and not touch (so its there ... without missing tools when you actually need it!).

 

speaksgeek

1000+ Posts
facebook is telling me these tool kits are on special today for $110 including delivery. An excellent tool kit just leave in your cars and not touch (so its there ... without missing tools when you actually need it!).
They're masters of the ever-changing price at 4wdsupercentre. Sometimes with, sometimes without postage. If you're keen, but in no hurry, it can be worth watching a particular item each day to see how they cycle it. I doubt they ever truly discount anything, only mark them up further to see who still buys it.
 
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