‘74 DS Resto

PeterMol

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Yes the modern insulation certainly makes an improvement over the old original stuff
I used a combination of acoustic and thermal on my DS👍
I also made a larger heat shield beside the steering column which made a noticeable difference
 

KAndy

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Long time between posts, but I have been chipping away...
Tackling the rust in the bottom of the doors to be specific, a legacy of poor glass seals, poor drainage and age.
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An exercise of in measuring, cutting, glueing, bending, filling and polishing.
The 3M glue has been fantastic, I tried spot-welding with varying success but this two part panel glue (see image) has been perfect for non structural panel replacement.
One final door to do next week, then I replace the window seals (inside and outside) and I’m close to painting. Before painting I plan to do the mechanicals, I’ve had the radiator fixed, I have a full gasket kit and a timing chain to fit, look over and replace any hydraulic issues (have new steering rack to fit) and electrics to sort out.
So not much left to do... don’t hold your breaths but I will report back in soon.
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Cheers, Andy
 

fritzelhund

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The crimped on door seals are an appalling bit of design. In the volcanic red mud and moisture of Tully, Far North Queensland, and the country's highest cyclone assisted rainfall, two years was about the lifetime before the tin worm struck.
 

bleudanube

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Panel bonding adhesive... not a bad idea! How do you do the joins of the panels? Just overlap them and then use filler to smoothen the seam?

I can imagine that working ok on long seams like the door skin, but how does it work on corners and small areas where one would normally weld to close the join?

good progress though, but also still a fair bit to do if the engine has to come out...
 

KAndy

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Panel bonding adhesive... not a bad idea! How do you do the joins of the panels? Just overlap them and then use filler to smoothen the seam?

I can imagine that working ok on long seams like the door skin, but how does it work on corners and small areas where one would normally weld to close the join?

good progress though, but also still a fair bit to do if the engine has to come out...
Yes, carefully overlap and mind the gap!
If you manage a good fit you don’t need much filler to smooth out the join. Corners are tricky, it does set damn hard so in some cases just angle grind or sand to suit.
Quite a bit to go... but I’m much more comfortable with grease under my nails rather than the grinding, measuring and filling involved in bodywork. Must say your build is setting a fine standard to aim for.
... in too deep, cant stop now!
 

DoubleChevron

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I've always thought a modern panel adhesive would be good for repairing these thin panels. How are you flanging the panel to be repaired ? Do the flanging tools access and flange deeply enough to allow for repair...... Oh, are you just glueing a brace behind the patch panel join? None of this should rust in the future with panel adhesive as the adhesive if filling all the voids and joins (so moisture can't get in there). Spot welds will allow moisture to sit between the layers.
 

KAndy

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For the first door I used a repair panel from Citroen Classics in the UK, that came flanged. panel price was not bad but the freight is diabolical. Other doors I borrowed an air flanger and gave it a go, so far so good... well, perhaps a bit more filling than with the repair panel to cover the joint, but not that bad. yes, I am hoping the glue will fill any void, that with a few layers of paint on the inside of the door and new rubber seals on the top (window sliders) should keep the doors solid for a little while
 

KAndy

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Still plodding away here.
Doors are all done, looking good.
So I now move into the business end forward of the A pillar.
The disrobing begins... everything slowly, methodically, carefully labeled and put aside so I can winch the engine & gearbox out.
Once out I’m planning to replace gaskets (got a oil leak somewhere), timing chain, instal a new starter motor and threaded carby inlet kit from Richo, radiator has been redone...
So drawing on the depth of experience here, any other ‘must do it while it’s out items’?
Thanks,
Andy
 

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bleudanube

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Looks like you are in the fun part soon...

i guess besides a good clean, check for rust and leaks in the pipe work and return lines - maybe new Drive shaft boots?

engine and steering rack might need some work as you mentioned, by the time you change leaking gaskets you may find other wear on the engine.
 

faulksy

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Engine out is a good time to have a look at the clutch and insulate the firewall on the engine bay side. Might also be worth looking at the engine mounts while you have easy access.
 

Budge

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Change the accumulator sphere. Replace the parking brake pads. Take the green, domed engine breather off the block and check it isn't all gummed up inside.
 

KAndy

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Engine out is a good time to have a look at the clutch and insulate the firewall on the engine bay side. Might also be worth looking at the engine mounts while you have easy access.
Thanks Faulksy, absolutely on the list insulating the firewall. Did I read somewhere you had also wrapped your exhaust manifold? How did that go?
 

KAndy

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Change the accumulator sphere. Replace the parking brake pads. Take the green, domed engine breather off the block and check it isn't all gummed up inside.
Thanks Budge, sphere out and done, had not considered the engine breather - on the list now. Parking break has plenty of meat on it, but I’m not looking forward to compress the parking break springs as part of removing the engine...
 

SilverBullet

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Make sure the brake calliper pistons are free and moving easily. Also check the brake discs are ok. It might also be a good time to relocate the regulator/accumulator to a more accessible area beside the radiator.
Cheers,
Ed
 

GreenBlood

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Parking break has plenty of meat on it, but I’m not looking forward to compress the parking break (brake] springs as part of removing the engine...

Not too bad with the right tool - enter ZIM No.122
Yours for loan for cost of postage :)

ZIM 122.jpg
 

faulksy

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Indeed I did wrap the down pipes and a short section of the manifolds. It makes a massive difference in radiant heat. You can just about hold onto the downpipes when the engine is running. The firewall and parking brake assembly don’t get nearly as hot anymore either.

It’s important not to wrap the whole thing as the extra heat can crack the cast iron manifolds and warp the head if you wrap all the way to the head.

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If I ever need to take the engine out, the firewall will be getting a layer of this stuff.
https://www.carbuilders.com.au/peel-stick-heat-shield
 

ARCHRIVAL

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look for fatigue cracking of front cross member and you cannot stick that back together it needs to be relieved and welded
 

faulksy

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Seeing as you're in that area, run a tap down the holes in the downpipe flanges and drill out the studs in the manifolds. Doing up the nuts that hold the manifold to the downpies is beyond tedious as the studs point down and are hard up against the frame and starter motor. Drilling out at least the two outer studs makes reassembly much easier as you wont have to fight with crows foot spanners or 1m long extensions from under the car. I'll take some photos later for you
 
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