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WTB [Fuel Pump - Renault 10 1969 - Adelaide]

bob

1000+ Posts
I'm assuming you would remove the mechanical pump altogether and make up a blanking plate to cover the hole?
spot on.... :)
......repairing and or maintaining the original equipment and keep it running as it was intended
I strongly doubt the "original equipment" ever worked properly in the systems that relied on the bleed-back-to-the-tank pressure regulation, standard on the r20 and fuego and probably others. The Fedtro transformed my r20, better economy, power and smoother running. There's nothing fancy about an electric pump, it's just a more efficient and rather inexpensive alternative - it's all about peace of mind.
Bob
 

59 Floride

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I strongly dispute all that. The last time I checked, Renaults aren't aircraft, they are actually cars and the car belonging to the OP is an old Renault and they do work well with original equipment if properly maintained. Swapping parts between different year model Renos is a far better option than corrupting the very thing that has bought many of us together in the first place, old Renault machinery. Some standards do need to be maintained and keeping the character of these cars alive is what it's all about even if they aren't perfect. For those seeking trouble free motoring I would suggest buying a brand new car with roadside assist and enjoy life. If old Renaults are your thing the expectation is different.

Hands off I say.:whip:
 

boleropilot

Active member
Renaults aren't aircraft, they are actually cars
yes, but if you have a choice of which one to catch fire, I'd choose the car...

"Swapping parts between different year model Renos is a far better option"
I agree wholeheartedly, unless there is a 'safer' option - as stated above, the Tedro thingy may not be

what I can't agree with is repairing a fuel pump that has had a mechanical failure that caused fuel to be released.

cheers to All

BP
 

JohnW

Too many posts!
I knurl the brass pipe by rolling it with a square file at 45 degrees to the length of the pipe. Simon posted on this here years ago recommending a Loctite product instead of Araldite.

These pipes commonly work loose in the end, so follow Geckoeng advice re the carby, although that one might actually be screwed in on your car I think.

Here's another 4CV pump solution I implemented.
 

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    One eighth inch BSP fitting for early 4CV fuel pump top.jpg
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  • Refurbished fuel pumps Jan 2015.jpg
    Refurbished fuel pumps Jan 2015.jpg
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JohnW

Too many posts!
yes, but if you have a choice of which one to catch fire, I'd choose the car...

"Swapping parts between different year model Renos is a far better option"
I agree wholeheartedly, unless there is a 'safer' option - as stated above, the Tedro thingy may not be

what I can't agree with is repairing a fuel pump that has had a mechanical failure that caused fuel to be released.

cheers to All

BP
All that has happened is a pressed fitting that worked loose you know. The fixes are probably stronger than the original. Lots of us have fixed these things perfectly satisfactorily.
 
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COL

Alpine A110
I knurl the brass pipe by rolling it with a square file at 45 degrees to the length of the pipe. Simon posted on this here years ago recommending a Loctite product instead of Araldite.

These pipes commonly work loose in the end, so follow Geckoeng advice re the carby, although that one might actually be screwed in on your car I think.

Here's another 4CV pump solution I implemented.
The screw in fix is probably the ultimate fix and would look neat with brass fittings, but not everyone would have a 1/8 gas tap in their tool kit.

I suggested the Araldite because it is the cheapest fix and most car enthusiast would most likely have a tube of this at home already. I have had a fuel entry pipe come out of my Weber carb on my R12. I fixed that with some Threebond 1211 and has not come out since.

Threebond and Loctite products are fairly expensive for the amount that would be used in this fix, although these products are world class.
 
No you miss the point entirely, these are genuine French pumps. Sold world wide, I have been using them for years on dozens of Renaults. Only owned 100. but maybe you know better.
 

pugwash

1000+ Posts
this happened to me on my 4cv ,on the outlet side ,didnt know what was happening till smoke coming out of demister vents, as it was running on what was in the carb whilst pumping fuel all over the dizzy and the battery ,i managed to put the fire out before it got away ,what ever you do do it properly as the result may be dire
 

JohnW

Too many posts!
The screw in fix is probably the ultimate fix and would look neat with brass fittings, but not everyone would have a 1/8 gas tap in their tool kit.

I suggested the Araldite because it is the cheapest fix and most car enthusiast would most likely have a tube of this at home already. I have had a fuel entry pipe come out of my Weber carb on my R12. I fixed that with some Threebond 1211 and has not come out since.

Threebond and Loctite products are fairly expensive for the amount that would be used in this fix, although these products are world class.
Yes..... I bought the tap for the job but naturally I've had the spare pump fixed and ready to go for about 15 years now! They talk to each other I think. Just keep the spare in the car and the one on the job never fails.

My Araldited joints have never moved, although it does soften I agree. Many Loctite products in my workshop are like mustard in that most is thrown away in the end, on the side of the plate in the case of mustard!
 
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boleropilot

Active member
this happened to me on my 4cv ,on the outlet side ,didnt know what was happening till smoke coming out of demister vents, as it was running on what was in the carb whilst pumping fuel all over the dizzy and the battery ,i managed to put the fire out before it got away ,what ever you do do it properly as the result may be dire
now you all knew I was going to reply to this post didn't you....I rest my case

my line of thinking includes the fact that I would hate to see a beautiful little car that has been lovingly restored go up in smoke

BP
 
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