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WTB [Fuel Pump - Renault 10 1969 - Adelaide]

Ian B

New member
Hello everyone, my fuel pump decided to pop-out its outlet pipe from the casing on the WE (see pictures) and am wondering if anyone in this group may have advice on how to find a replacement pump or maybe even fix it? Sorry if this sounds a little naive, I am only just starting out with this car. Many thanks, Ian
 

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59 Floride

VIP Sponsor
Yep, wot he said. We've all had to attend to the same task, welcome to the wonderful world of Renault.
 
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Ian B

New member
Big thanks to both of you. Super helpful! Should I be worried about what pressure caused this in the first place? I added a photo of the beast just to give some more context. Again, many thanks, Ian
 

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bob

1000+ Posts
G'day,

The best way to repair mechanical petrol pumps is by replacement with an impulse pump - "Fedtro 40104" has always worked for me.... :)

Granted, mounting can be difficult, they need to be where they wont "drum", and via rubber grommets, low down close to the tank is favoured. The Fedtro has a well established reputation for reliability, and, carby friendly pressure with volume. Look at your requirements and pick a pump to suit. They run continuous. A filter before the pump will protect it from tank crud.

cheers,
Bob
 

bob

1000+ Posts
Should I be worried about what pressure caused this in the first place
it's always reassuring to measure the output pressure on these units - particularly the later Renault system where the pressure regulation is by the dubious "bleed system" tank return line.
Bob
 

boleropilot

Active member
G'day Ian, that is indeed a very nice looking 10 ! I am in the process of restoring two of the lil' babies, slowly but surely. I can only hope that one day my 10s will look as pretty as yours.
Btw you are in the right place for the best assistance on the planet when it comes to Renaults - the guys/gals that inhabit these pages have been playing with Renaults for decades and you will find them extremely keen to offer advice that is Gold.
Cheers,
Boleropilot
 
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boleropilot

Active member
G'day,

The best way to repair mechanical petrol pumps is by replacement with an impulse pump - "Fedtro 40104" has always worked for me.... :)

Granted, mounting can be difficult, they need to be where they wont "drum", and via rubber grommets, low down close to the tank is favoured. The Fedtro has a well established reputation for reliability, and, carby friendly pressure with volume. Look at your requirements and pick a pump to suit. They run continuous. A filter before the pump will protect it from tank crud.

cheers,
Bob
Hey Bob, I agree with your comments about the Fedtro - I've seen them mounted on a few ultralight aircraft so they obviously have an excellent reputation. I'm assuming you would remove the mechanical pump altogether and make up a blanking plate to cover the hole?

Hey Ian, from my experience with mechanical stuff, if one side fails, the other side might not be far behind - you could spend time fixing the broken part just to have the fix fail or have the other side go - the location of the damaged fuel line close to the ignition coil doesn't fill me with a great deal of happiness either !

BP
 
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R8 Dream

Active member
G'day,

The best way to repair mechanical petrol pumps is by replacement with an impulse pump - "Fedtro 40104" has always worked for me.... :)

Granted, mounting can be difficult, they need to be where they wont "drum", and via rubber grommets, low down close to the tank is favoured. The Fedtro has a well established reputation for reliability, and, carby friendly pressure with volume. Look at your requirements and pick a pump to suit. They run continuous. A filter before the pump will protect it from tank crud.

cheers,
Bob
They are a great replacement for the mechanical old pump, but as the run continuously they can be dangerous in case of a severe accident, so make sure you also have at the same time a tachometric relay fitted which cuts power to the fuel pump when it senses the engine has stopped (for any reason). Taxis run this for their gas systems also.
Although not critical for the 1100cc engine & std carb, fuel pressure can vary a little from the claimed 3-4psi - if concerned consider running a fuel regulator as well.
 
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59 Floride

VIP Sponsor
Gees you blokes, what's wrong with repairing and or maintaining the original equipment and keep it running as it was intended. Nothing will last forever including fancy electric pumps, relays, additional wiring and other bogus add-ons. These old cars are just that, old cars, and that's part of the privilege of owning them. If you want a more modern car you are spoiled for choice but for Pete's sake save the little buggers and don't go contaminating them with non-Renault stuff.

Shame on you all..G
 

Frans

1000+ Posts
I would suggest that you disturb the brass pipe a little so that it there is some roughage for the Araldite to grip onto and at the same time it goes a little tighter into the pump. Test the other side and the carburettor as well.

Frans.
 

boleropilot

Active member
maybe because I spent some considerable time re-fuelling aircraft in the defence forces that I have a particular respect for the combination of faulty fuel equipment and the occasional spark. by all means buy a new "original style" fuel pump if you don't want to bastardise your car by changing a faulty component, but from my experience, pissing about with faulty fuel components is playing with fire (pun intended)

here endeth the rant

BP
 
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