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11BL with ID block

KiwiPete

New member
I was fortunate to be able to source a cast iron timing cover in fairly good shape. I had no problems applying the torque of 16N-m (which is the torque recommended in the ID19 manual) using a paper gasket. The takeaway from this is don't torque to 16N-m on an aluminium cover with a cork gasket.....

View attachment 129183
It looks so clean and shiny!
I'm glad the timing cover made it to you intact and usable.
 

gerrypro

1000+ Posts
A brilliant job John! I think though that I will just be happy to change my oil a little more often (every 2,000 miles). Does it hit the cover for the left hand wiring connector block? Does that short pipe run from the oil pump to the filter housing and then feed back to the main gallery? Being an ID block you are obviously making use of the casting for the single cylinder hydraulic pump to mount the housing back plate! Very clever!
What mods did you make to the feed pipe from the pump so that it passes through the left side of the engine block?
 

citroenthusiast

Active member
A brilliant job John! I think though that I will just be happy to change my oil a little more often (every 2,000 miles). Does it hit the cover for the left hand wiring connector block? Does that short pipe run from the oil pump to the filter housing and then feed back to the main gallery? Being an ID block you are obviously making use of the casting for the single cylinder hydraulic pump to mount the housing back plate! Very clever!
What mods did you make to the feed pipe from the pump so that it passes through the left side of the engine block?
I had to drill and spot face a hole in the side of the block at a particular location so there was plenty of clearance for the crankshaft. I attached a JIC 90 degree bulkhead fitting through the hole, with a copper crush washer to seal it (hence the spot face).

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I plugged the original oil feed to the oil gallery with a grub screw and a flat copper disk. The rest of the plumbing was pretty straightforward. Out of the side of the block, through the filter and then back in the rear of the oil gallery. I used stainless steel tubing and JIC fittings except at the oil pump which is a 45 degree flare.

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A swivel coupling at the oil gallery allowed me to tighten the adapter while maintaining the orientation I needed to connect the oil tube. As you can see from the photograph of the new timing cover, I tapped the boss in the side of the oil gallery so I could add an oil pressure switch. The oil telltale light I was looking for will go in the dashboard in place of the spark advance which I don't need because this engine has an ID distributor. At lest to the untrained eye it will appear reasonably period correct. Clearance with the terminal block is adequate. Here is what it looked like when I mocked it up a couple of years ago, before I pulled the engine.

180622 oil filter mock up (2).JPG
 

citroenthusiast

Active member
Well, I put the engine transaxle back in the frame today...
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Unfortunately, I forgot to put the splined couplings on the driveshafts before I dropped the engine in (Doh). So, what is the consensus. Should I pull the engine out again, or is it a simple matter of separating a ball joint to get enough clearance to assemble the driveshaft?
 

citroenthusiast

Active member
I finished mocking up of the accessories. The pink plastic brackets will be replaced with steel brackets. Everything will fit below the hood line (represented by the silver bar). Apologies to the purists but living in Phoenix Arizona, where we see 40C pretty regularly, I wanted air conditioning. Otherwise, SWMBO won't drive with me.

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At least it's all reversible if someone in the future wants to revert to a generator and delete the A/C.
 

gerrypro

1000+ Posts
Well, I put the engine transaxle back in the frame today...View attachment 129245

Unfortunately, I forgot to put the splined couplings on the driveshafts before I dropped the engine in (Doh). So, what is the consensus. Should I pull the engine out again, or is it a simple matter of separating a ball joint to get enough clearance to assemble the driveshaft?
Yes just drop the bottom ball joint and separate track rod end. Lever the hub up and there is enough room to fit the cardan shafts. When re-engaging the splines witch the alignment axis of the inner cross with the axis of the double Hookes joint They are in line when the grease nipples of the cardan and the ball pin are in line!
BTW what tyres are they John?
 

citroenthusiast

Active member
Yes just drop the bottom ball joint and separate track rod end. Lever the hub up and there is enough room to fit the cardan shafts. When re-engaging the splines witch the alignment axis of the inner cross with the axis of the double Hookes joint They are in line when the grease nipples of the cardan and the ball pin are in line!
BTW what tyres are they John?
Thanks. The manual section I read seemed to say you had to remove the brake drum and the outer bearing, etc. Glad to know there is enough room if you undo the track rod and lower joint.

400mm tyres were impossible to find in the USA in the 1980's through fairly recently. A common modification back then was to cut and weld together the center of a 400mm rim with a 15-inch Volkswagen beetle rim. This allowed use of (then) fairly common 15-inch passenger tyres. This car has rims that were modified to 15 inch. The tyres themselves are "ARIZONIAN" brand, which is a tyre brand marketed by Discount Tire here in Arizona.
 

KiwiPete

New member
I finished mocking up of the accessories. The pink plastic brackets will be replaced with steel brackets. Everything will fit below the hood line (represented by the silver bar). Apologies to the purists but living in Phoenix Arizona, where we see 40C pretty regularly, I wanted air conditioning. Otherwise, SWMBO won't drive with me.

View attachment 129257


View attachment 129258


At least it's all reversible if someone in the future wants to revert to a generator and delete the A/C.
Tidy installation. I'll add this to my ideas file.

What does the cabin part of the installation look like?
 

gerrypro

1000+ Posts
Thanks. The manual section I read seemed to say you had to remove the brake drum and the outer bearing, etc. Glad to know there is enough room if you undo the track rod and lower joint.

400mm tyres were impossible to find in the USA in the 1980's through fairly recently. A common modification back then was to cut and weld together the center of a 400mm rim with a 15-inch Volkswagen beetle rim. This allowed use of (then) fairly common 15-inch passenger tyres. This car has rims that were modified to 15 inch. The tyres themselves are "ARIZONIAN" brand, which is a tyre brand marketed by Discount Tire here in Arizona.
Immediately post war there was a supply problem here with metric sizes. The solution was to cut and weld on 16 inch rims and fit commonly available cross ply tyres!
 
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