Tool Talk

Didn't see this the first time.

If you had to disconnect three wires from the motor then it is a three phase.

Don't forget earthing conductors when you count. It's 3 actives.

Induction motors are easily recognized - https://www.electrical4u.com/construction-of-three-phase-induction-motor/

I was thinking the same thing .... 4 wires including earth. however if you have the cover off the wiring as in this case, you can ignore which ever wire is screwed to the body of the motor :)
 
Didn't see this the first time.

If you had to disconnect three wires from the motor then it is a three phase.
I was thinking the same thing .... 4 wires including earth. however if you have the cover off the wiring as in this case, you can ignore which ever wire is screwed to the body of the motor :)
Counting the number of wires from the motor is not a clear cut way of deciding whether the motor is single or three phases. Most lathes have the ability to run in reverse. Reversing a three phase motor is easy by swapping two phases over. With a single phase motor you need to reverse either the run winding or the start winding to get the motor to reverse.

If there is a cylinder looking thing on the outside of the motor which is capacitor, the motor will be a single phase motor.
 
Counting the number of wires from the motor is not a clear cut way of deciding whether the motor is single or three phases. Most lathes have the ability to run in reverse. Reversing a three phase motor is easy by swapping two phases over. With a single phase motor you need to reverse either the run winding or the start winding to get the motor to reverse.

If there is a cylinder looking thing on the outside of the motor which is capacitor, the motor will be a single phase motor.

its interesting isn't it .... I scored a really cheap bandsaw a while back. it came with the electric motor in bits that apparently needed replacing. I reassembled it and plugged it in ... "bang" out goes the circuit breaker almost immedialy after starting. How does an electric motor motor dead short? well I pulled it apart, the start circuit has a bit built in centripetal switch ... and the mechanism has slid down the shaft, so when it expanded out, it could short on the case.

The band saw looks like its still got its original blade in it and unused. I found out why, as I used it for about a dozen cuts and it did the same hying again. The grub screw holding the switch mechanism to the shaft comes loose. The 2nd time I loctited it. we'll see if it lasts this time. If it comes loose again, I'll stake it to the shaft somehow (maybe drill a hole for the screw to lock into on the shaft).

I'd be tempted to buy a big grunty VFD for this lathe. Think of the possibilities owning a big grunty one will open up. big grinders, car hoists, wheel balancers, tire changers .... all the old industrial stuff that is to old for industry, but cheap as no-one can run it due to 3 phase.
 
Expensive three phase connections are a fairly new thing. My house has three phases and so do some of my near neighbours. All were connected before 2000.
 
Counting the number of wires from the motor is not a clear cut way of deciding whether the motor is single or three phases. Most lathes have the ability to run in reverse.

The motor in my lathe (a Blomqvist, a Swedish South Bend model A copy) is even more complicated than that. Not only can it be reversed, it is also two speed.

Roger
 
Not really a tool per se, but I went to my mate's "collectibles" shop for a coffee, and he asked me if I wanted an "old stand" that he was throwing away.

"Does the Pope wear a funny hat"?

It's all metal, it's Australian, but given it has the word "emission" on it I'm guessing from the late '70s early '80s?
I only keep a few sizes of hose (no emissions stuff) so I'm thinking I'll use the top two bars for rolls of electrical wire.
It might stop me from buying sh#t I've already got, if I can actually see what I've already got.😁

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Not really a tool per se, but I went to my mate's "collectibles" shop for a coffee, and he asked me if I wanted an "old stand" that he was throwing away.

"Does the Pope wear a funny hat"?

It's all metal, it's Australian, but given it has the word "emission" on it I'm guessing from the late '70s early '80s?
I only keep a few sizes of hose (no emissions stuff) so I'm thinking I'll use the top two bars for rolls of electrical wire.
It might stop me from buying sh#t I've already got, if I can actually see what I've already got.😁

View attachment 239476
Nah, you'll check if you have it, find its not there, buy a roll ..... then put it there beside the roll that has now magically appeared :clown: ... or is that just me ?
 
Nah, you'll check if you have it, find its not there, buy a roll ..... then put it there beside the roll that has now magically appeared :clown: ... or is that just me ?
I've put 3 rolls of green wire on It so far.🤔
 
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I've put 3 rolls of green wire on It so far.🤔
Yes, many of us do that sort of thing. Me included.

And it's not just with parts. I have watched Buttercup Bob make two clockwork brake retracting tools for early Dees when he couldn't find the last tool he had made. He gave me one when he found another.

Roger
 
You guys are cleverer than I.
Got a few pics of cut wires and motor. Apparently the lathe fell over, and landed on the motor. Managed to bang the cover in shape (as per someone's advice) and the fins now spin well. Spins freely with no observable faults. Have all the stuff to remount.
Though, need to sort out the power.
1. Reckon I can just 'twist, solder and shrink' where it's been snipped?
2. Again, thanks to someone's advice, motor's a 3-phase so I think I'll get one of these rather than rewire the place: https://www.vevor.com.au/variable-f...0v-1-or-3-phase-in-3-phase-out-p_010276894883 . Look about right (motor is apparently 0.75kW/1hp)?

Goal #1 is to see it spin. Also missing key, and hoping emergency stop button isn't stuck in 'off'...
 

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You guys are cleverer than I.
Got a few pics of cut wires and motor. Apparently the lathe fell over, and landed on the motor. Managed to bang the cover in shape (as per someone's advice) and the fins now spin well. Spins freely with no observable faults. Have all the stuff to remount.
Though, need to sort out the power.
1. Reckon I can just 'twist, solder and shrink' where it's been snipped?
2. Again, thanks to someone's advice, motor's a 3-phase so I think I'll get one of these rather than rewire the place: https://www.vevor.com.au/variable-f...0v-1-or-3-phase-in-3-phase-out-p_010276894883 . Look about right (motor is apparently 0.75kW/1hp)?

Goal #1 is to see it spin. Also missing key, and hoping emergency stop button isn't stuck in 'off'...
That VSD should do the job OK.

Three phase motors come wired in either star or delta configuration. Looking at the name plate I reckon that motor configuration is easily changed. I'm guessing that your lathe was used on a three phase supply so you need to take the cover off the junction box and see how it is configured. With that VSD you will want it in Delta configuration so that you can get the most power and torque out of the motor. Take a pic of the inside the motor terminal box and post on here and I will tell you what configuration you have.

With that VSD you can either control the motor from the front panel of you can remotely control the motor. There are some terminals inside the VSD that you can connect remote switches. There is also a menu which is accessed from the buttons on the VSD to configure the VSD for local/remote control and set speed etc.

I have a VSD and three phase motor setup for my lathe but as yet have not fitted it. One of those round tuit jobs. I'm currently running a single phase motor.
 
The motor in my lathe (a Blomqvist, a Swedish South Bend model A copy) is even more complicated than that. Not only can it be reversed, it is also two speed.

Roger
There some interesting motors out there, both in single and three phase. Before VSD's and soft starters there was also some interesting ways to change the speed and torque as well.
 
old welder spotted on facebook marketplace in ballarat for $250. how is it so clean? Look at where the gas bottle sits, the paint isn't even scratched from sitting a gas bottle there.
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Apparently works, but is far to powerful and can't weld thin metal. I did chat the owner. Apperently very expensive when new, it comes with new rolls of gasless wire. Have you picked the issue yet? Its never worked for him as its to powerful ...... Well this is a big commercial welder, not a little toy welder designed for gasless wire. Gasless wire requires the polarity to be reversed. if you don't do this, it'll just blast the weld pool away leaving holes ( ie: way to powerful for thin metal :clown: )
 

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Anyway, the real question is obviously ................................... How the hell do I get this thing out of the boot of my car, it took two people to lift it in there :unsure: With a gas bottle and proper wire I'm betting it welds pretty much any thickness metal ( or you would need to pull the cover off and change the wiring over for it to run the crappy gasless wire)
 
Do you have an engine crane? Or perhaps take off the boot lid and use your chain block. Or just go and borrow a neighbour.
 
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I nearly lost the bloody thing 3/4 of the way down ... .:clown:

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I was wrong, you can reverse the polarity.

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anyway, the guy did warn me I would need to chase up rollers for the wire feed if I wanted to run thinner than 1.2 gasless wire

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but I'm thinking if I turn the roller upside down, the other side is 0.8 (or maybe 0.9mm) wire. I'm surprised he didn't notice.

Why hasn't anyone, er, "fixed" the wire plug on this yet? So after 5 minutes with a file ... I give up and push the thing over to the bench grinder and fix up the earth pin on the plug and plug it in.

It did turn on, so turned the power knobs down to 1 (lowest) to see if the wire feed works. A loud "THUD" as a giant sized contactor slams home and I'm standing in the dark thinking to myself ..... Hmm..... maybe one is the highest setting, not the lowest setting ..... and I though the damn shed had a 15amp breaker in it. So I turned the power back on and flicked the power setting down to 5 on both knobs. and it splattered away, just like I remember shitty gasless wire does. I was concerned the gas may not work on it if its never been used. So I hooked up the gas bottle, and yep, we have gas at the tip when the trigger is pulled.

What a win :dance: :dance: I'll go out later tonight, flip that wire feed roller over and set it up for some gas wire and see how it welds. I'm going to have to either put a higher amperage circuit breaker in the shed or get one with a slower ramp up/trip time. The hoist often pops it too. Before you all yell at me, its 25... no 35amps out to the shed from memory at the main fuse box, so I'm not sure why such a low amperage circuit breaker is fitted ot the board int he shed. it sure is a big heavy wire runnign through the roof space of the house that feeds the shed either way.

I'll have to chase up a manual and work out what all the dials on it are for too.
 
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