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Hydraulic pipe question - why dead ends?

bleudanube

Member
Hello Brainstrust...

have been cleaning all the hydraulic lines and found three ends plugged - deliberately or not?

the three ends are marked with blue tape on the photo below - they are on three seperate pipe sections.

AB070812-C245-4325-8EB0-29BE841ED910.jpeg


Looking at a photo that I took before I pulled it all apart definitely shows that the top blue end wasn’t connected at all.

AC75B5C7-382E-48FD-8C93-A79BF2E9A8C9.jpeg


I at first thought dirt had plugged them up, but couldn’t free the pipe by carefully drilling into the end. They all seem to be closed off about 15mm in from the end.

would anyone have any idea what the point of this could be? Should they all be open? What would have been connected to those ends? Power steering? Else?

Sven
 
It would be helpful to know what vehicle this came from. I am guessing first nose DS or ID looking at the plate with the six holes, which I think only the very early cars have on the brake valve. It may be that the car has been modified to delete some accessory (for example BVH converted to BVM), or the pipes themselves came from a car with more accessories.
 

bleudanube

Member
It would be helpful to know what vehicle this came from. I am guessing first nose DS or ID looking at the plate with the six holes, which I think only the very early cars have on the brake valve. It may be that the car has been modified to delete some accessory (for example BVH converted to BVM), or the pipes themselves came from a car with more accessories.
well, unless someone went to town on it years ago, I was hoping it it still ‘original’ on this 1964 ID19F Safari...

It ‘allegedly’ had power steering at some stage, but not 100% sure. I am getting the required parts to put PS back in, so maybe I can use those dead ends for that purpose? Just have to open them up and probably re-crimp the ends...!?
 

DoubleChevron

Real cars have hydraulics
well, unless someone went to town on it years ago, I was hoping it it still ‘original’ on this 1964 ID19F Safari...

It ‘allegedly’ had power steering at some stage, but not 100% sure. I am getting the required parts to put PS back in, so maybe I can use those dead ends for that purpose? Just have to open them up and probably re-crimp the ends...!?
Parts car is the trick. You'll need the steering column/wheel, possibly the steering relays (I didn't), the pump, the cam pulley and the plumbing. there was only one return line to cobble up from memory. I cut the power steering coupling off and welded it onto the manual steered wheel (I wanted to keep the large original wheel in the car).
 

bleudanube

Member
Parts car is the trick. You'll need the steering column/wheel, possibly the steering relays (I didn't), the pump, the cam pulley and the plumbing. there was only one return line to cobble up from memory. I cut the power steering coupling off and welded it onto the manual steered wheel (I wanted to keep the large original wheel in the car).
Almost there already: found a steering wheel, Relais and rack plus a few pipes and other bits I need.

being a Safari, the car has the correct pump setup already. had the same thought on the Wheel grafting, but if so find the right 40cm one I can keep the original larger one For someone else...

Sven
 

DoubleChevron

Real cars have hydraulics
Almost there already: found a steering wheel, Relais and rack plus a few pipes and other bits I need.

being a Safari, the car has the correct pump setup already. had the same thought on the Wheel grafting, but if so find the right 40cm one I can keep the original larger one For someone else...

Sven
I don't have an earlier wheel here.... only trashed late rubber wheels (which I thought would suck in an early car :) ). If you have an early powered steered wheel, I'd certainly use it!
 

faulksy

Member
I have wheel with black spoke and binding here in Melbourne. It wouldn't be to hard to remove the rather sun damaged black coating on the spoke and paint it grey. Let me know if you want it

The other option is Denton has quite a few knocking around in varying states of repair
 

bleudanube

Member
Thanks faulksy, but have found a wheel already. Same as yours, so will either re-wrap and paint or graft on the stub and keep the larger non PS wheel... still TBC.

but does anyone have anymore of an idea why the three ends are plugged and where they would normally be connected to?

Sven
 

faulksy

Member
You mentioned that the car may have once had power steering fitted. It’s possible those ends were soldered shut when the ps rack was removed. At least one of those pipe assemblies looks like the one that connects to a ps rack.
 

bleudanube

Member
Allegedly... there is also one more pipe end that has been “properly” cut and crimped, so actually 4 dead ends.
HowMany lines do normally go to a PS rack? I thought it was only two... one in, one back out? I might have to find some drawings of the pipe layouts and shapes to try and marry them up...
 
The pipe assembly with the six fluid holes appears to be DF453-49 ( DS parts manual 466 page 157). The two connections go to the brake valve and are (1) from the rear suspension and (2) to the rear brakes. I assume the line that is soldered shut is the line that goes to the rear suspension, otherwise you would have no rear brakes whatsoever. This means you will have a corresponding plug, or other modification to part DF392-76 (also on page 157) which will be located on the firewall behind the suspension cover. Hypothetically, if a brake valve were fitted that did not have the trolley for adjusting the brake bias, or if the brake system were modified to use two brake accumulators (as was the case with very early cars) this line would need to be plugged as would half of the tee (DF392-76)

The pipe assembly with two holes appears to be the connection for the power steering rack (Part D444-82 on page 158). As others have said, if the car once had power steering which has been removed, the pressure feed to the power steering unit would have to be plugged.

The pipe assembly in the middle seems familiar to me, but I can’t quite place it. If you can show where on the vehicle it was, perhaps I can remember.
 
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