Car club suggestions

Richard W

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My 205 is now eligible for historic registration. This obviously needs to be done through a car club. I could re-join the Peugeot car club, but hot hatches don't seem to be much of a focus for them - and certainly not highly modified 16V 205s...

Does anyone have suggestions for any Sydney based clubs that do activities on a weekend, would have a spread of interesting cars, and have at least some of their members younger than 70?
 
rock up to the local cars and coffees and find some like minded people. i find no-one really cares about marques of cars these days. they find a like minded person and are happy to get along :) ask them what car clubs are the go!
 
Get onto the CAMs (Motorsport Australia) site and look up the clubs that are running events you think you would like to do.

Hill Climbs would suit your car, and are not as high speed as track events. Probably most of your car would still be in one piece if you had an off, and you don't need a roll cage. They run a State (NSW) series championship of about 6 events a year with usually a couple in the bush each year. You can enter as many of the events as you like.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4iQfjfimjs
Bitumen motorkhanas are also worth a look at too. Really learn how to turn corners and need a lot of car control. Driven right your car should be unbeatable in class.

But please don't be put off if some 70 year old knocks you off though! (Sorry could not resist, I know what you mean though). :) Robert
 
Thanks guys. I am not really looking for competitive motorsport - just a club that has some social events a little more dynamic than a mid week 'drive to the tea shop'. The Peugeot Car Club doesn't even have that on its website these days.

I'm entering my mid 50s now, so I know 70 is coming for me frighteningly fast - but I look at the photos pages of most clubs and struggle to find anyone in the photos who looks close to my generation, let alone younger. I guess it says something about the demographics of our hobby.

But I do like the idea of trying a hill climb. And I have no illusions that my driving skills would be anywhere close to either you or Graham!
 
I understand where he is coming fr
Thanks guys. I am not really looking for competitive motorsport - just a club that has some social events a little more dynamic than a mid week 'drive to the tea shop'. The Peugeot Car Club doesn't even have that on its website these days.

I'm entering my mid 50s now, so I know 70 is coming for me frighteningly fast - but I look at the photos pages of most clubs and struggle to find anyone in the photos who looks close to my generation, let alone younger. I guess it says something about the demographics of our hobby.

But I do like the idea of trying a hill climb. And I have no illusions that my driving skills would be anywhere close to either you or Graham!
how can young people afford classic cars these days. Look at the houses they are forced to live in usually. There isn't even offstreet parking, let alone space for a classic. The world in changing, unless you bought into the classic car scene 20'ish years ago, the costs of getting into it now are very high :(
 
If your car is "highly modified" it does not qualify in NSW for Historic Registration as HR requires the car to be pretty much to standard. It may however qualify for Classic Registration which is similar but different. Read the link. Whether a club participates in Classic Reg is their call.

I am historic plates registrar for Cit Car Club NSW so I have a fairly good idea of what I'm writing about.
 
If your car is "highly modified" it does not qualify in NSW for Historic Registration as HR requires the car to be pretty much to standard. It may however qualify for Classic Registration which is similar but different. Read the link. Whether a club participates in Classic Reg is their call.

I am historic plates registrar for Cit Car Club NSW so I have a fairly good idea of what I'm writing about.
Its interesting isnt' it. For example what about an old 1940's ford ..... That has had an engine swap from flathead back in the 1970's. It's now been "modified" for much longer than it was ever original. How does this go for club rego :unsure: Its like putting a DS23 motor into a Traction in 1970 ... and now claiming its not original 54 years later :)
 
QLD just has Special Interest Vehicle rego (SIV).
The only qualifier is that the vehicle is at least 30 years of age.
My '65 F250 has a 351 Cleveland in it (it was originally a 6), how long has it been in there, f#ck knows. The conversion predates the use of mod plates in QLD, so at least since the '80s.🤷‍♂️
 
If your car is "highly modified" it does not qualify in NSW for Historic Registration as HR requires the car to be pretty much to standard. It may however qualify for Classic Registration which is similar but different. Read the link. Whether a club participates in Classic Reg is their call.

I am historic plates registrar for Cit Car Club NSW so I have a fairly good idea of what I'm writing about.
Thanks Craig. Yes, I am aware of the two different schemes. I should have been more careful with the language in my email. I've got an old Jag on historic reg through JDCC, but clearly the 205 with engine swap and modified suspension and bigger brakes doesn't qualify for that scheme but hopefully can be approved through the classic reg scheme.
 
My 205 is now eligible for historic registration. This obviously needs to be done through a car club. I could re-join the Peugeot car club, but hot hatches don't seem to be much of a focus for them - and certainly not highly modified 16V 205s...

Does anyone have suggestions for any Sydney based clubs that do activities on a weekend, would have a spread of interesting cars, and have at least some of their members younger than 70?
Hi Richard W, I'm sorry you feel that way about us older sports minded car enthusiasts. :) Try talking to the Mazda MX5 Club apparently from talking to one of their members they have heaps of sporting days and fastish drives and a good cross section of young and older active members with all sorts of cars. Cheers Pete
 
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In the first instance, you just need a club to take your money and sign you off. What you do socially is another matter I'd suggest. Yes, it would be nice if the two aligned, but does it really matter?
 
Do all car clubs have the 6 months waiting period before you can apply for historic registration?
 
Thanks for the information!
No, they don't. If you have a bunch of mates, just start your own club. A lot of us have. I'm not really one for the politics and stuff of car clubs. Especially younger people with kids, how on earth do they have the time or money to go to club events and meetings ?
 
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