1950 - 203 Sedan - French site

Dano

1000+ Posts
Interesting info re ownership in the write up.

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https://www.lesanciennes.com/annonce/peugeot-203-a-1950-a451845?ftype=vo&q=Peugeot 203
 

peter munro

Member
does anyone know the name of the colour on the sedan as l will be painting my 203 van & it was it's original colour on the van???

203vanXXX3 2.jpg

Mount Franklin​

Daylesford, Victoria 1981...​

 
From 203 Caracteristiques issued by Peugeot January 1950
N3Y grenat 450, noir, gris 451
ND3Y Rouge moyen ou grenat, gris 453 bleu 426 beige 452
The 203 U T3 also has vert 445, the T3 vert 445 only and the S4 creme.
No explanation of paint codes.
Album 203 gives a slightly different list of colours.
In 1955 it lists noir, gris 501 and gris - bleu 508 and bleu 502 in 1956.
In the Australian assembled cars there was a distinctive blue and the cream popular in the C was more of a yellow. The early cars had burgundy wheels. There was a green that was more of a grey green.
 

peter munro

Member
From 203 Caracteristiques issued by Peugeot January 1950
N3Y grenat 450, noir, gris 451
ND3Y Rouge moyen ou grenat, gris 453 bleu 426 beige 452
The 203 U T3 also has vert 445, the T3 vert 445 only and the S4 creme.
No explanation of paint codes.
Album 203 gives a slightly different list of colours.
In 1955 it lists noir, gris 501 and gris - bleu 508 and bleu 502 in 1956.
In the Australian assembled cars there was a distinctive blue and the cream popular in the C was more of a yellow. The early cars had burgundy wheels. There was a green that was more of a grey green.
thanks Russell, l will look into it, l still have a lot to do on the van before it's paint job...
PS: most 203's & 403's l have owned over the years have been painted grey...
 

Commerciale

New member
If the van is a Harden and Johnstone assembly the colour should be Fortress Grey. This colour was common with other vehicles assembled by Chrysler Dodge Distributors in Adelaide. Other colours used were Wedgewood Blue and Arunta Beige (as per my wagon). You probably have no chance of matching it by name. Best bet is to have an old sample computer matched.
 
The trouble is all the old 203's we used to see generally had faded paint so the colours weren't at their best. My 203 has the original grey like the front of that van and I was once inclined to paint a brighter colour but now I think it suits it. Polished and in the right light it bring out he line. You have to be careful choosing a colour for an early model because it has to complement the sleekness of the shape. Basil Moran was trying to replicate the metallic blue of his decouvrable and chose a dark blue metallic from a the 505 for his 1951. Didn't work, too hard a colour. The first car sold out of Melbourne was black, and that was a 1951 colour that worked. Stand car at the Adelaide Motor Show in 1950 was white with burgundy wheels. The French press thought the colours offered there dull and called the burgundy "wine dregs". The yellow common on the C was perhaps a little too harsh but it was always unpolished. Important decision, colour.
 

fnqvmuch

1000+ Posts
Apart from the arguments about two-pack and clear-cote vs old hues, depth and shine, 'Originality' is moot here.
What with the old imports in undercoat for C&G, H&J - etc., etc., and thereafter, were the CKD 203 pressings shipped primed? were the interiors French paint?
 
Gordon was of the opinion the first shipments were painted and removing the trim on the earliest cars seems to confirm that. The choice of colour for a car is very important if originality is sought.
Car panels were shipped bare metal which is why rust was a constant problem for assemblers. After phosphoric acid treatment and buffing inert rust staining is still apparent.
 
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