Valve in Mi16 cooling system.
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  1. #1
    1000+ Posts 504-504-504's Avatar
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    Default Valve in Mi16 cooling system.

    Can anyone identify the cooling system valve pictured below?
    It hangs off the gearbox end of the MI16 (S1) inlet manifold.
    Connected by a piece of rightangled bend hose.
    Tube running off it is open ended and points to the ground.

    What is its purpose?
    Where do the wires connecting to it get their signal from?
    Can it be dispensed with?

    If the coolant flow to the manifold can be blocked off without affecting anything else I may be able to dispense with it.

    Warm manifold might be good for fuel vaporisation and economy but not the best for max power.

    Paul

    “A straight is merely the distance between two corners.”

    Current: Peugeot 205 GTi Mi16 1987
    Peugeot 205 Si, one red one silver, both 1991.
    Peugeot 504 Wagon, V6 and 5 speed gearbox.
    Isuzu (Holden) Rodeo, 4WD dual cab, extended chassis.
    Past: Goliath, Isuzu Bellett, Austin A30, Peugeot 203, 403, 404, 504,505.
    Subaru 4WD wagon, Toyota Hilux Dual Cab Diesel 4WD.

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  2. #2
    1000+ Posts PeterT's Avatar
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    Canister purge, nothing to do with cooling. Canister lives under front LH guard. Signal comes from ECU. If you remove it, ECU will show a fault code. If you must remove it, replace with a 1.2KΩ resistor.

    '92 205 Mi16
    '90 Mi16x4

  3. #3
    Demannu-facturing! Demannu's Avatar
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    Peter is of course correct, but here's some somewhat related info as an aside.

    There are two OTHER hoses that go to the throttle body on an Mi16 for throttle body heating.

    The throttle body heating is not there to heat up the intake air, in fact it has a completely negligible effect at doing this. Instead it is there to prevent the throttle plate icing up and jamming.

    I bypassed the throttle body heating system on my first Mi16 when I was young and naive (some would say I'm still one of them). A few days later, I drove to Melbourne (from Adelaide).

    The weather was cool, not cold - mid teens perhaps, but rather humid. Every time I was cruising along on flat ground for more than a few minutes, I would find the throttle would stick.

    Opening the bonnet revealed a throttle body covered in condensation, and depending on how long I'd been driving it, bits of ice. This was despite being located directly behind the hot side of the radiator! I just had to leave it for 3 or 4 minutes and it would be fine again. It got so annoying that by the time I reached Nhill, I pulled over, pulled out the toolkit and reconnected the throttle body heating hoses. Problem solved.

    Moral of the story: You won't get any more power. But you might get some extra problems you weren't expecting!
    Scotty

    Melbourne - Dandenong Ranges

    1956 Peugeot 403 - 'Francois' - resto project

    1969 Peugeot 504 - 'Pascal' - daily driver project

    1970 Peugeot 404 Utility - 'Brutus' - resto project

    1978 Peugeot 604 - as yet unnamed - V6 on straight LPG

    1987 Peugeot 505 - as yet unnamed - project car

    1999 Peugeot 406 Coupé - 'Chloe' - 5 speed manual

    2011 Peugeot 3008 XTE HDi - 'Zoe' - hatchback on steroids

    2014 Peugeot RCZ - 'Remy'

    1999 Range Rover 4.6 HSE - 'Grover' - tow car

  4. #4
    1000+ Posts 504-504-504's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterT View Post
    Canister purge, nothing to do with cooling. Canister lives under front LH guard. Signal comes from ECU. If you remove it, ECU will show a fault code. If you must remove it, replace with a 1.2KΩ resistor.
    Thanks Peter.
    Good news and bad news.
    Looks like it might be the radiator leaking from the impact of the tubing/piping during the hard braking.
    Will check radiator.
    Will keep the canister purge valve in system but need to relocate its pickup point from the front of the manifold. Could it be plumbed into the crankcase breather hose. (Visible in picture below.)

    Paul
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Valve in Mi16 cooling system.-jse_p1040940.jpg  

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts 504-504-504's Avatar
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    Default Throttle Body Hoses

    Quote Originally Posted by Demannu View Post
    Peter is of course correct, but here's some somewhat related info as an aside.

    There are two OTHER hoses that go to the throttle body on an Mi16 for throttle body heating.

    The throttle body heating is not there to heat up the intake air, in fact it has a completely negligible effect at doing this. Instead it is there to prevent the throttle plate icing up and jamming.

    I bypassed the throttle body heating system on my first Mi16 when I was young and naive (some would say I'm still one of them). A few days later, I drove to Melbourne (from Adelaide).

    The weather was cool, not cold - mid teens perhaps, but rather humid. Every time I was cruising along on flat ground for more than a few minutes, I would find the throttle would stick.

    Opening the bonnet revealed a throttle body covered in condensation, and depending on how long I'd been driving it, bits of ice. This was despite being located directly behind the hot side of the radiator! I just had to leave it for 3 or 4 minutes and it would be fine again. It got so annoying that by the time I reached Nhill, I pulled over, pulled out the toolkit and reconnected the throttle body heating hoses. Problem solved.

    Moral of the story: You won't get any more power. But you might get some extra problems you weren't expecting!
    Thanks Scotty

    I'm guessing that my engine is already missing those two hoses.
    No problems so far but will watch out for icing.
    Bit warmer up this way so might avert the problem a bit.
    Winter will tell.

    Paul.

    Oops looks like picture didn't load.
    Please see above posting.

  6. #6
    Demannu-facturing! Demannu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 504-504-504 View Post
    Thanks Scotty

    I'm guessing that my engine is already missing those two hoses.
    No problems so far but will watch out for icing.
    Bit warmer up this way so might avert the problem a bit.
    Winter will tell.

    Paul.

    Oops looks like picture didn't load.
    Please see above posting.
    I'd say that humidity is more concerning than low temperature.
    Scotty

    Melbourne - Dandenong Ranges

    1956 Peugeot 403 - 'Francois' - resto project

    1969 Peugeot 504 - 'Pascal' - daily driver project

    1970 Peugeot 404 Utility - 'Brutus' - resto project

    1978 Peugeot 604 - as yet unnamed - V6 on straight LPG

    1987 Peugeot 505 - as yet unnamed - project car

    1999 Peugeot 406 Coupé - 'Chloe' - 5 speed manual

    2011 Peugeot 3008 XTE HDi - 'Zoe' - hatchback on steroids

    2014 Peugeot RCZ - 'Remy'

    1999 Range Rover 4.6 HSE - 'Grover' - tow car

  7. #7
    1000+ Posts 504-504-504's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Demannu View Post
    I'd say that humidity is more concerning than low temperature.
    We certainly have plenty of that up here.
    No problems so far but your advice will give me some clue to any drop off in performance under the circumstances you described.
    Thanks again.

    Paul

  8. #8
    Fellow Frogger! racing405's Avatar
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    The cooling effect on your original throttle body is more about pressure drop across the throttle body. As gas expands it makes cold, some better than others. Air is a pretty poor refrigerant compared to say Freon or even LPG.

    I wouldn't plumb the canister purge in anywhere other than it's original location. Remove it altogether and fit a resistor so the ECU doesn't know your cheating. It will make zero difference to your power, negligible difference to economy, but will mean you have a fuel vapour source and smell at the front of your car. This canister is where your fuel tank breathes. My canister vents straight to air under the guard, and I've never smelt fuel at the front of the car.

    Good huntin'.
    racing 405
    1:59:09 last time at Phillip Island - less than standard Mi16.

  9. #9
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    Default Connection besides cannister purge pipe.

    Thanks for the replies everyone.
    Radiator is out and about to be repaired.
    Will cut off and block the pickup pipe for the cannister purge so it doesn't damage radiator again.
    Leaving canister purge valve in circuit for now.

    Can anyone tell me what the port is besides the pickup pipe?
    Should it be connected to anything?

    Paul

    “A straight is merely the distance between two corners.”

    “Corners: radar free zones.”

    Current: Peugeot 205 GTi Mi16 1987
    Peugeot 205 Si, one red one silver, both 1991.
    Peugeot 504 Wagon, V6 and 5 speed gearbox.
    Isuzu (Holden) Rodeo, 4WD dual cab, extended chassis.
    Past: Goliath, Isuzu Bellett, Austin A30, Peugeot 203, 403, 404, 504,505.
    Subaru 4WD wagon, Toyota Hilux Dual Cab Diesel 4WD.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Valve in Mi16 cooling system.-jse_p1040020.jpg   Valve in Mi16 cooling system.-jse_p1040019.jpg  

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