406 Brake Rotors
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  1. #1
    Tadpole
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    Default 406 Brake Rotors

    Had a look at my front rotors and they need replacing, I want to do it myself ?. So does anybody know the correct procedure and also where to buy the rotors, l suppose l should replace the disc pads l am in Melb. thks denny

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  2. #2
    1000+ Posts CHRI'S16's Avatar
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    Denny it would be worthwhile purchasing a Haynes service manual as it explains it in there with pictures fairly well. Having said that if you have any doubts, dont compremise, brakes on a car are something you dont want to get wrong.... - Chris
    ... ptui!

  3. #3
    Fellow Frogger! John505's Avatar
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    Denny,
    Replacing the front rotors is a fairly straightforward job & getting the Haynes manual is worthwhile if only for this task.
    Basically disconnect the battery, remove the disc pads & then remove the calipers, leaving them suspended by wire/rope from the strut. You will need a Torx socket - can't recall what size to undo the two bolts that hold the caliper on the hub.
    Remove the hub disc assembly, and using soft jaw vice to hold the assembly, swap the disc rotor over. Use threadlocker on the bolts & using a good torque wrench, secure the caliper back onto the hub/disc assembly now in place.
    Push piston back into its shell as far as possible & preferably use new pads - try EAI as standard Peugeot pads are extremely abrasive. It is good practice to use new Torx caliper securing bolts & a new caliper/brake pad securing bolt.
    (Use only methylated spirits to clean brake parts)
    John505

  4. #4
    Gone Fishin' Haakon's Avatar
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    Not quite right John505 - the discs come off on their own without touching the hub.

    Its dead easy. Unbolt the caliper assembly (2 big Torx bolts. You will have to buy the bit - Repco sell a Torx bit set for around $20 that has the right size). Wise to push the caliper piston back first - lever it back gently with a big screwdriver between inner pad and the disc.

    Now undo the two little Torx bolts that hold the disc to the hub. These only hold the disc on when you have a wheel off - the disc is held otherwise bythe wheel bolts. The disc is now free.

    Clean up the disc/hub mating surface, attach new disc.

    Pull out old pads, slot in new ones and refit caliper. Torque bolts if you have a torque wrench, or lean on them if you dont. Press pedal to seat pads. Done. Should take you a leisurly 3/4 of an hour to do both sides.

    Ring Carrevelle (9890 9061) for new pads and rotors - very cheap

  5. #5
    Fellow Frogger! John505's Avatar
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    I stand corrected Haakon! It is a few years since I did the job on my ex's 406ST. Simpler then than the 504 where the hub & rotor are removed as the one assembly!
    My ex was admittedly heavy on braking & clocked up about 800km each week - but during the three years we owned the car it wore out the original rotors & two replacements. But when you look at the OEM disc pads they are like compressed steel wool!
    John505

  6. #6
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Always use old pads with new discs and vice versa.

    You may even (just) get away without having to remove the calipers. Works on some cars, not on others. I haven't done a 406.

    Tim

  7. #7
    Gone Fishin' Haakon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tcusack
    Always use old pads with new discs and vice versa.
    Thats a new one...

    When fitting new rotors, you should always use new pads. If the old pads have lots of life left, they can be reused, but only after deglazing them with coarse emery paper back to remove any ridges and ensure even bedding in with the new discs.

  8. #8
    Fellow Frogger!
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    No, it's an old one...............

    Old habits die hard. This applies to bedding in new rotors and pads on race cars. Presumably doesn't apply here, although I'd be tempted to leave the old pads in until the new rotors had had a few heat cycles. Hardly worth the extra effort, though............

    Tim

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