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Thread: Tool advice

  1. #1
    1000+ Posts Dave's Avatar
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    Default Tool advice

    Hi Guys,

    I've almost got the 16v out of the car. Now in the past when i have done head swaps etc I have used my trusty super cheap torque wrench. But I think I should probably get a good quality torque wrench since i'm doing a full rebuild on the 16v. Can anyone advise what is a good brand/type, where I could get one from and how much I should expect to pay.

    Also what sort of tools do I need to check the condition of the crank etc, or should I just take it to Euroserve and get Ian to check it out??

    Thanks,

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  2. #2
    1000+ Posts kermit's Avatar
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    Don't know about brand or price but try Glenford Tools or TradeTools for good quality stuff.
    http://www.glenfords.com.au/stores.htm#QLD
    http://www.tradetools.com.au/customp...page=OurStores
    Cheers Simon
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  3. #3
    1000+ Posts CHRI'S16's Avatar
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    Dave I had both a Mitutoyo & a Snap-On but both were in excess of $500, recently i've bought a Total Tools branded one and its worked great, so for $219 for a 200mm unit it was a great price. - Chris
    ... ptui!

  4. #4
    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    I've got a W&B for the inch-pounds, and a Norbar for the heavy stuff. The Norbar was $360-ish from Total Tools, the Warren & Brown $210 from Just Tools. The non-ratchet design of the W&B can get frustrating at times but it's beautifully made.

    Six point sockets are worth owning, especially the deep type.

    Verniers for rough guessing on bores, depths and journals. Plastigage for checking.

    Look for a set of parallel sided 1/2" wide feelers and you can do old-school piston/bore test fits.

    Borrow larger mics for inside bore and piston readings or you will need to go into the rebuild business to reclaim some cost. A smaller mic that can measure main and rod journals is good to buy.

    Regards, Adam.

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts Wildebeest's Avatar
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    Default Tool advice,

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave
    Hi Guys,

    I've almost got the 16v out of the car. Now in the past when i have done head swaps etc I have used my trusty super cheap torque wrench. But I think I should probably get a good quality torque wrench since i'm doing a full rebuild on the 16v. Can anyone advise what is a good brand/type, where I could get one from and how much I should expect to pay.

    Also what sort of tools do I need to check the condition of the crank etc, or should I just take it to Euroserve and get Ian to check it out??

    Thanks,

    Dave
    Dave,
    To Addo's recommendations I would add an extra long breaker bar for when you need to pull down the cyl head, 300 deg. angle tightening ?
    Oh, don't forget the torque angle gauge.

  6. #6
    1000+ Posts Dave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildebeest
    Dave,
    To Addo's recommendations I would add an extra long breaker bar for when you need to pull down the cyl head, 300 deg. angle tightening ?
    Oh, don't forget the torque angle gauge.
    thanks, already have a breaker and an angle guage from previous head jobs, just would like a more accurate torque wrench. So does one have to spend >200 to get a decent one?? I can't remember how much my super cheap one was, probably <80 bucks.

    Dave


  7. #7
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
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    I've got a lovely Warren & Brown one for inch-pounds (probably the same as Adam's) and a cheapish micrometer adjust one that I bought second hand for about $40 for the bigger stuff. I did wonder whether the cheapie was well enough calibrated so I checked it against my father's big W&B and they were very close. I just set them both to the same torque, then tightened a nut with one until it tripped and checked to see if the other would tighten it more before it tripped, then reversed the order. Maybe you could try the same thing, if you can find someone with what you consider to be a decent one. You might find that your cheapy is close enough. I think the issue is not that you get the absolute torque spot on but the fact that all bolts are the same torque and they are tightened in stages and their torque is close enough.

    Roger

  8. #8
    1000+ Posts PeterT's Avatar
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    A 3/8" W&B torque wrench is perfect for a 16V. The 1/2" model is too big, unless you want to start torqueing axle nuts as well. The 3/8" model can do the 12Nm bolts. I paid just over $200 for the W&B from SnapOn. Buy a SnapOn T55 1/2" socket however. You'll break just about everything else on the market. You'll need to turn down the OD of the socket to 21-22mm however, so it fits in the head bolt holes. And of course the extra long breaker bar.

    How many times will you measure a crankshaft? If you could find a good 2nd hand extension outside micrometer set than grab it.

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  9. #9
    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    Relax time between torquings is often not adhered to. It can be pretty crucial to a durable outcome. Stop for a cuppa or whatever keeps you sane, the gasket will compress slightly under the intermediate pressure in this short while.

    Cheers, Adam.

    p.s. Hook up a cheap and a pricey torque wrench nose-to-nose. Set both the same, and see which clicks off first. Adjust the exxy one and try again, and you'll be able to "calibrate" a cheap one with benchmark results.

    p.p.s. Some cheaper sockets have too much of a "lead in" on the nose. Combined with a tiny tilt to the wrench, this can result in only engaging on half the bolt head height, leading to anything from ugly knuckles to burred heads. Peter's idea with the Snap-On socket sounds pretty neat. Don't be afraid to redesign a tool if it will get you through the process better.
    Last edited by addo; 3rd February 2006 at 10:50 PM.

  10. #10
    VIP Sponsor richo's Avatar
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    Default torque wrenchs

    As a practising tool perve, my preferred brand is Stahlwille. Torque wrenches too at outrageous prices.
    However when it is all said and done the W&B click stop is a good thing, their new micrometer adjustment range is even better ( but again more expensive )
    The suggestion of the 3/8" drive W&B has merit.
    Teng brand torque wrenchs at the cheaper end of the market appear robust and reasnably accurate.
    As another poster pointed out, the main thing is that all the bolts requiring a set torque are the same.
    For sockets Stahlwille is usually thinner than most on the market and I'm yet to break one ( owned now 30 years )
    Stahlwille type 13 ring/open enders are also a good investment, they're the short series and often useable in tighter areas. Stahlwille are also thinner in the ring area than some.
    Whether they're superior to other respected brands is debateable ad nauseum. Most tradeblokes have a preferred brand.
    My 2 cents worth.

  11. #11
    farmerdave
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    If you have a choice, go for a deflecting beam type like the W&B or Snapon rather than a micrometer clicker type, the clickers tend to go out of adjustment very easily.
    I have an SK 3/8 clicker and a W&B 1/2 at present, the SK gets used most because of the ratchet head.

    Farmerdave

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