Strut spring removal woodworker style
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! Aprilia's Avatar
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    Default Strut spring removal woodworker style

    After a near death experience with only 2 clamps and the strut laying on its side ,
    I came up with this ,still working in a heightend state but felt safe (ish).
    Doug

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  2. #2
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
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    Neat.
    I like the custom benchtop.

    What stops it going sproing with clamps being thrown outwards?
    Just friction???

    Jo

  3. #3
    Fellow Frogger! Aprilia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jo proffi View Post
    Neat.
    I like the custom benchtop.

    What stops it going sproing with clamps being thrown outwards?
    Just friction???

    Jo
    Hello Jo,
    well I would say my faith in our lord Jesus Christ.
    But I am a heathen Athiest, so it couldn't be that.
    I tried to keep the clamps parallel and turn them down evenly so as to keep a uniform downward pressure on all sides.
    On the way back up, that was a concern but there was so little pressure
    on the spring at near full extension I could control it by hand.
    Doug

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    Quote Originally Posted by jo proffi View Post
    Neat.
    I like the custom benchtop.

    What stops it going sproing with clamps being thrown outwards?
    Just friction???

    Jo
    My concern too Jo - perhaps a circular band around the upper section of the clamps might prevent that tendency to slip outwards under tension.

    think I like my Fuego style three clamps that hook directly onto the upper springs from a non slip secured saddle position.

    Ken

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts schlitzaugen's Avatar
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    You are risking life and limb with a spring that isn't even that compressed. I have the normal spring compressors from Repco (not the cheap liquorice steel ones from Supercheap, perhaps only one step higher) and they did the job without breaking a sweat. For the love of whatever heathen things you believe in, don't try to compress a Renault 12 front spring that way.
    ACHTUNG ALLES LOOKENPEEPERS

    Das computermachine is nicht fur gefingerpoken und mittengrabben. Ist easy schnappen der springenwerk, blowenfusen und poppencorken mit spitssparken. Ist nicht fur gewerken bei das dummkopfen. Das rubbernecken sightseeren keepen hands in das pockets-relaxen und watch das blinkenlights.

  6. #6
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Do it once do it safely.

    This device cost me less that $50 and doesn't require "good luck" to use safely.

    Over engineering is good when life and limb is involved.
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    1000+ Posts Beano's Avatar
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    I made something very similar, Robmac.....but instead of the two steel plates at the ends, I used very dense hardwood.
    I still did not trust it though.... I did not point it towards myself when in use.

  8. #8
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beano View Post
    I made something very similar, Robmac.....but instead of the two steel plates at the ends, I used very dense hardwood.
    I still did not trust it though.... I did not point it towards myself when in use.
    As I said earlier. Three pieces 8mm plate, 2 lengths of M12 allthread, some long series nuts and a morning with a hole saw and drill press made a completely safe spring compressor. Cost was around $50.

    Timber has grain, if you are unfortunate enough to apply a load parallel to the grain the timber WILL split. Even jarra, red gum or iron bark.

    I'm over the concept of "keeping clear" or being careful" just the same as I am over working on cars supported by any kind jack.

    Risk shouldn't be a factor in workshop.

    Better to pay someone do the job than cobble up dangerous tool.
    Last edited by robmac; 11th March 2013 at 08:58 PM.

  9. #9
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    I agree Robmac,and beano anything that has springs under compression, its wise to treat with respect, Ilearnt that as an apprentice renovating 5.5 inch field guns that were first manufactured in 1918!! and used again in WWII - winding out the recuperator recoil springs on those old weapons and seeing the results of a couple of the long internal threads stripping as they were used to take the tension off, was a real eye opener to see the internal springs, the large ratchet wrench and the central threaded rod fly down the length of the workshop at the Bendigo Ordnance Factory and dent the brick wall. That experience leaves an indelible footprint on your memory and a little prayer you weren't in the way. We didn 't lose any lives but one older guy lost his toes when one let go!!

    Ken

  10. #10
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kenfuego View Post
    I agree Robmac,and beano anything that has springs under compression, its wise to treat with respect, I learnt that as an apprentice
    I have learned my lessons from much smaller springs.
    The first was when i was about 7, with a Bic retractable pen that i was chewing at the time, and somehow i managed to unload the end of the pen into my tooth.
    FMD, that hurts and I immediately learned that teeth and springs make for a very unpleasant combination.

    Found that out again not long after when i went to pull apart a wind-up bedside alarm clock, and as soon as I undid the back plate the spring threw itself and all the jewels up at my face.
    Had to broaden the description to include 'any part of the face' and springs make for a bad combination.

    Jo

    Jo

  11. #11
    1000+ Posts BIGRR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aprilia View Post
    After a near death experience with only 2 clamps and the strut laying on its side ,
    I came up with this ,still working in a heightend state but felt safe (ish).
    Doug
    That is more unsafe than the time I used coat hangers!!
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    Too many posts! JohnW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by robmac View Post
    Do it once do it safely.

    This device cost me less that $50 and doesn't require "good luck" to use safely.

    Over engineering is good when life and limb is involved.
    That I like. The unsecured woodworking clamps made me break into a cold sweat.
    JohnW

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  13. #13
    1000+ Posts Wildebeest's Avatar
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    There is available a much improved coil spring compressor for doing the job on the car. As well as having the two claw foot it has an extra claw that prevents the clamp from slipping around the coil. A problem if I recall on springs [Renault ?] that curve as they are being compressed.
    The brand name escapes me, probably for professional use.

  14. #14
    Tadpole
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    hmmmmm you would probably all need the toilet after I tell you I use two or three tie down straps......works a treat and with the ratchet you are similar to a threaded rod in that you compress slowly and evenly..... but make sure you have the tie down straps looped a couple of times lying flat and even so they take up strain evenly.... works on the same principle that cranes use....more runs equals greater lift or in this case holding power....
    even then it pays to be safe and work from the side...I have found most accidents happen from people being unaware of danger,,,or forgetting to keep themselves in a safe position.....

  15. #15
    Tadpole
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    As I said earlier. Three pieces 8mm plate, 2 lengths of M12 allthread, some long series nuts and a morning with a hole saw and drill press made a completely safe spring compressor. Cost was around $50.

    Timber has grain, if you are unfortunate enough to apply a load parallel to the grain the timber WILL split. Even jarra, red gum or iron bark.

    I'm over the concept of "keeping clear" or being careful" just the same as I am over working on cars supported by any kind jack.

    Risk shouldn't be a factor in workshop.

    Better to pay someone do the job than cobble up dangerous tool.


    I concur and in a perfect world my workshop would have every tool I may possibly need and machines to help make what I need.., however not all of us have hole saws and drill presses........ so when not available we make do with what can be made to work,

    this is when being safe should be paramount.....being aware of forces and how different materials can all be used to do same job...

    I don't know if you have ever seen the Icelandic video of how 4x4 adventure nutters get their tyres re-seated back onto the rims in the middle of nowhere with no tools normally found in a tyre shop......nothing like a can of lighter fluid and a cigarette lighter.....very effective....but some would scream unsafe .......

    each to their own, but know the limits of materials you work with and probably most importantly know your own limits of capability....

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