Rivets v Welding v Epoxy

Dave

1000+ Posts
I think even the bunnings setup would be okay these days. A refundable 200 dollar deposit, then no rental costs:

Argon as an example:

https://www.bunnings.com.au/coregas-trade-n-go-gas-size-d-argon-gas_p5910384

"Never pay rent again. Purchase Argon gas including a cylinder deposit and when you are finished with your gas cylinder return it for a cylinder refund. Gas comes in a cylinder, and a fully refundable $200 deposit is required to be paid at time of purchase."
 

shibuichi

Member
Re: welding fumes...
Call me a delicate flower or coalmine canary but welding fumes make my nose bleed.
I recommend adding to your PPE kit a pack of disposable P2 masks (may be labelled for gas/metal fumes/organic vapour). They fit under the welding face shield and stop the nasties getting into your lungs. No a super sucker exhaust fan wasn’t good enough, only the masks stopped the bleeding.

(I keep P2 filters on hand for my silicon mask cartridges as well, essential for resin fumes et al.)
 

DoubleChevron

Real cars have hydraulics
Re: welding fumes...
Call me a delicate flower or coalmine canary but welding fumes make my nose bleed.
I recommend adding to your PPE kit a pack of disposable P2 masks (may be labelled for gas/metal fumes/organic vapour). They fit under the welding face shield and stop the nasties getting into your lungs. No a super sucker exhaust fan wasn’t good enough, only the masks stopped the bleeding.

(I keep P2 filters on hand for my silicon mask cartridges as well, essential for resin fumes et al.)
You must be hyper-sensitive to something in the fumes. Best bet is probably one of those welding masks that has a built in respirator that you wear around your waist (it pumps air in from behind you).
 

shibuichi

Member
You must be hyper-sensitive to something in the fumes. Best bet is probably one of those welding masks that has a built in respirator that you wear around your waist (it pumps air in from behind you).
The disposable P2s do the job for me.
I once set a used mask next to a new one after a day of welding and my workshop buddies said “Oh ****, that’s in our lungs!” Blackened by the dust and gas...
Take care of yourselves people.
 

bowie

1000+ Posts
Good points!
I had a little indoor fan lined up I had intended to use to at least keep the fumes off me, but a simple mask is a nice addition.

My box of toys arrived today! Now to wait till the weekend.
 

craigb

New member
Interesting thread with lots of info.

I just wanted to add to references about rivets, most are aluminium, which if put into steel that you want to be strong and take vibration etc, will only last so long. But you can get steel rivets.

And I think you have gone down the right road. I think of all the resto work I have done over the years and time gone into undoing stuff that obviously has taken a lot of time and effort - tube of sikaflex best part of $40 and a small gasless mig that could join thin steel $200.... and it doesn't go off. Although I have used sikaflex for specific jobs and I do agree with the words said about it here. It does depend on how well any job is done. But cut rust, cut a patch, weld it in, clean it up and paint - fastest and longest lasting method I have found.

And another point - the time is in cutting the hole and the patch. If you were a mate and had a patch all lined up ready to go, would be no big deal for me to drag my welder to your place and spend a few minutes welding, and you could grind and clean it up later. I think there are operators that do that sort of thing for a fee. But your new welder sounds like a good choice with plenty of options. Do you know anyone with some old panels you can practice on? I think you have a couple of self serve wreckers and sure they wouldn't want much to grab a couple of damaged panels off them to play with.
 
Re: welding fumes...
Call me a delicate flower or coalmine canary but welding fumes make my nose bleed.
I recommend adding to your PPE kit a pack of disposable P2 masks (may be labelled for gas/metal fumes/organic vapour). They fit under the welding face shield and stop the nasties getting into your lungs. No a super sucker exhaust fan wasn’t good enough, only the masks stopped the bleeding.

(I keep P2 filters on hand for my silicon mask cartridges as well, essential for resin fumes et al.)
Are you using "Gasless" Mig? (ie the flux-cored welding wire that doesn't need shielding gas supply). Remember when I had one of these machines the fumes were horrific in terms of both volume & toxicity. With gas shielding in a well-ventilated workspace I don't bother with a filter personally.
Regards, Rob
 

shibuichi

Member
Are you using "Gasless" Mig? (ie the flux-cored welding wire that doesn't need shielding gas supply). Remember when I had one of these machines the fumes were horrific in terms of both volume & toxicity. With gas shielding in a well-ventilated workspace I don't bother with a filter personally.
Regards, Rob
I was welding in the context of TAFE courses as part of programs on two different campuses so the facilities had full industrial extraction piped to each workstation. Excellent ventilation.
Stick, gasless mig, oxy/ace brazing and cutting - didn’t matter, I still reacted. Of course, even cutting steel with a disc on an angle grinder irritates me. So yeah, I am sensitive, but you know...
I lost a favourite cousin to mesothelioma and others to cancer so I’d rather be super cautious....
If I can see dust or smell fumes I avoid breathing it in as much as possible.
Masking up may not save me but it’s a small price for reducing risk.
 

COL

Alpine A110
Well thanks for the encouragement, I know have enough room in my shed to work on the dam thing without getting rained on. I even now have a walk in tool-robe.

I'm gonna get a little 6x6 for the "garden" and fill it with crap that still shouldn't be in here, but it's functional.

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Yaaaaaaay
Look at all that room, must be the most organised garage in Australia, lets run a book on how long it stays that way. ;)
 
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