Rivets v Welding v Epoxy

Dave

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I think even the bunnings setup would be okay these days. A refundable 200 dollar deposit, then no rental costs:

Argon as an example:

https://www.bunnings.com.au/coregas-trade-n-go-gas-size-d-argon-gas_p5910384

"Never pay rent again. Purchase Argon gas including a cylinder deposit and when you are finished with your gas cylinder return it for a cylinder refund. Gas comes in a cylinder, and a fully refundable $200 deposit is required to be paid at time of purchase."
 

shibuichi

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Re: welding fumes...
Call me a delicate flower or coalmine canary but welding fumes make my nose bleed.
I recommend adding to your PPE kit a pack of disposable P2 masks (may be labelled for gas/metal fumes/organic vapour). They fit under the welding face shield and stop the nasties getting into your lungs. No a super sucker exhaust fan wasn’t good enough, only the masks stopped the bleeding.

(I keep P2 filters on hand for my silicon mask cartridges as well, essential for resin fumes et al.)
 

DoubleChevron

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Re: welding fumes...
Call me a delicate flower or coalmine canary but welding fumes make my nose bleed.
I recommend adding to your PPE kit a pack of disposable P2 masks (may be labelled for gas/metal fumes/organic vapour). They fit under the welding face shield and stop the nasties getting into your lungs. No a super sucker exhaust fan wasn’t good enough, only the masks stopped the bleeding.

(I keep P2 filters on hand for my silicon mask cartridges as well, essential for resin fumes et al.)
You must be hyper-sensitive to something in the fumes. Best bet is probably one of those welding masks that has a built in respirator that you wear around your waist (it pumps air in from behind you).
 

shibuichi

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You must be hyper-sensitive to something in the fumes. Best bet is probably one of those welding masks that has a built in respirator that you wear around your waist (it pumps air in from behind you).
The disposable P2s do the job for me.
I once set a used mask next to a new one after a day of welding and my workshop buddies said “Oh ****, that’s in our lungs!” Blackened by the dust and gas...
Take care of yourselves people.
 

Bowie

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Good points!
I had a little indoor fan lined up I had intended to use to at least keep the fumes off me, but a simple mask is a nice addition.

My box of toys arrived today! Now to wait till the weekend.
 

craigb

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Interesting thread with lots of info.

I just wanted to add to references about rivets, most are aluminium, which if put into steel that you want to be strong and take vibration etc, will only last so long. But you can get steel rivets.

And I think you have gone down the right road. I think of all the resto work I have done over the years and time gone into undoing stuff that obviously has taken a lot of time and effort - tube of sikaflex best part of $40 and a small gasless mig that could join thin steel $200.... and it doesn't go off. Although I have used sikaflex for specific jobs and I do agree with the words said about it here. It does depend on how well any job is done. But cut rust, cut a patch, weld it in, clean it up and paint - fastest and longest lasting method I have found.

And another point - the time is in cutting the hole and the patch. If you were a mate and had a patch all lined up ready to go, would be no big deal for me to drag my welder to your place and spend a few minutes welding, and you could grind and clean it up later. I think there are operators that do that sort of thing for a fee. But your new welder sounds like a good choice with plenty of options. Do you know anyone with some old panels you can practice on? I think you have a couple of self serve wreckers and sure they wouldn't want much to grab a couple of damaged panels off them to play with.
 

baldrick56

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Re: welding fumes...
Call me a delicate flower or coalmine canary but welding fumes make my nose bleed.
I recommend adding to your PPE kit a pack of disposable P2 masks (may be labelled for gas/metal fumes/organic vapour). They fit under the welding face shield and stop the nasties getting into your lungs. No a super sucker exhaust fan wasn’t good enough, only the masks stopped the bleeding.

(I keep P2 filters on hand for my silicon mask cartridges as well, essential for resin fumes et al.)
Are you using "Gasless" Mig? (ie the flux-cored welding wire that doesn't need shielding gas supply). Remember when I had one of these machines the fumes were horrific in terms of both volume & toxicity. With gas shielding in a well-ventilated workspace I don't bother with a filter personally.
Regards, Rob
 

shibuichi

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Are you using "Gasless" Mig? (ie the flux-cored welding wire that doesn't need shielding gas supply). Remember when I had one of these machines the fumes were horrific in terms of both volume & toxicity. With gas shielding in a well-ventilated workspace I don't bother with a filter personally.
Regards, Rob
I was welding in the context of TAFE courses as part of programs on two different campuses so the facilities had full industrial extraction piped to each workstation. Excellent ventilation.
Stick, gasless mig, oxy/ace brazing and cutting - didn’t matter, I still reacted. Of course, even cutting steel with a disc on an angle grinder irritates me. So yeah, I am sensitive, but you know...
I lost a favourite cousin to mesothelioma and others to cancer so I’d rather be super cautious....
If I can see dust or smell fumes I avoid breathing it in as much as possible.
Masking up may not save me but it’s a small price for reducing risk.
 

Bowie

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Well thanks for the encouragement, I know have enough room in my shed to work on the dam thing without getting rained on. I even now have a walk in tool-robe.

I'm gonna get a little 6x6 for the "garden" and fill it with crap that still shouldn't be in here, but it's functional.


Yaaaaaaay
 
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COL

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Well thanks for the encouragement, I know have enough room in my shed to work on the dam thing without getting rained on. I even now have a walk in tool-robe.

I'm gonna get a little 6x6 for the "garden" and fill it with crap that still shouldn't be in here, but it's functional.

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Yaaaaaaay
Look at all that room, must be the most organised garage in Australia, lets run a book on how long it stays that way. ;)
 

gsmack

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Hi All
Bouncing this thread as I need some welding/welder advice.
For those who don't know, I'm a farmer up in NE Vic. The joy of being a farmer is one can dedicate a shed to ones BX collection :rolleyes:, the problem with being a farmer who can't weld is one has to cart random stuff to random places, so I figured after 13 years it's time I get myself a welder for 'Christmas'.

Had a play with a mate's old sticker welder the other day, so learnt some basics, but now comes the hard part, creating a shortlist of potential welders.

My requirements:
- welding old broken farm equipment, ie flail mowers
- welding SS for food processing
- welding new mild steel for frames etc
- single phase
-15A is fine, got plugs in enough places

My probelms:
- oh so many :ROFLMAO:
- got a problem in my neck that makes fine hand control a challenge or it fatigues quickly :cautious: may just make welding very challenging

So suggestions and thoughts re technology, are the tri welders (stick, MIG, TIG) any good, or do they just do all three formats badly to averagely?

Thoughts re best tech for easy arc ignition, HF seems to be key, is that only on TIG?

The reviews for this one seem good and a middle of the road price
https://www.totaltools.com.au/12564...-ultra-multi-process-inverter-welder-w1006185

How 'limiting' will it be once I've had some practice?

The machine doesn't need to be a workhorse that can handle 5 hrs a week, but it would be expected to be used for an 1hr every 6 months or so, for the forseeable future.

Also on my current shortlist are:
https://sydneytools.com.au/product/...d-205-smart-set-migtigmma-inverter-welder-kit
and
https://sydneytools.com.au/product/...se-migtigstick-welder-kit-with-welding-helmet

I like the concept of having gasless MIG as an option, especially if I'm welding in-situ, for example down at the pump.
What does 'pulse' give me?
 

PeterT

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Gasless MIG is the worst option, in my opinion. If I had to weld something down in the paddock, I'd use stick (MMA) everytime. It's not effected by wind and it's easy & cheap to change materials. The best options for car body work is 0.6mm MIG or TIG. Stainless is easy with TIG, or MMA in bigger sections. You need AC TIG for aluminium. I'd be wanting high frequency start for any TIG if you're a beginner.

There are lots of cheap Chinese machines around now. I'd be buying from a place that only sells welders, not Sydney Tools or Hare & Forbes. I'm not saying that well known brands aren't made in China, but you need the back up and support from the welding store.

Pulse MIG is great for aluminium welding, so you can lay down those coins. It makes it easy to weld without burning through. I wouldn't have that option high on the list if you're not doing long runs or production welding.
 

shibuichi

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Listen to @PeterT regarding equipment.

got a problem in my neck that makes fine hand control a challenge or it fatigues quickly :cautious: may just make welding very challenging
I live with chronic pain from muscle and nerve damage and haven’t tried TIG but did find MIG less fatiguing than stick. Welding is doable despite injuries but do take regular breaks for stretching (talk to your physio or osteopath) and chuck a jar of tiger balm in your toolbox.
 

Greenpeace

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I'm a train wreck too, so far as fine motor, vision, fatigue etc.
I only have a stick welder, and it's a non-adjustable $119 CIG hobby welder I bought at Target 35 years ago.🙄
I've taken to cutting the welding rods in half as I weld as much by feel as by sight and the tip wobbles around too much with a full length rod.🤷‍♂️
My welder's great for steel in the 3mm to 10mm thickness range and I also weld exhausts together with it (with modified technique), most of the exhaust pipe these days is 1.5mm wall thickness.
If I want something super delicate or super neat done I get my son to do it at his workplace, he MIGs and TIGs.
If you can access the back of the job on thin materials, placing a piece of non ferrous metal there (brass is good) will stop you blowing holes through it.
But 99.9% I do at home. Having said that I'm not embarrassed about my welds and things don't fall off so I guess they're OK.😉
This is the supercharger flange on my Reliant done with my cheap arse welder.
But whatever welder you choose, practice might not make you perfect, but it will make you better.👍

Resized_20220114_194516.jpeg
 

gsmack

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Thanks @PeterT
Good to know that stick is better than gasless MIG out in the paddock
Gasless MIG is the worst option, in my opinion. If I had to weld something down in the paddock, I'd use stick (MMA) everytime. It's not effected by wind and it's easy & cheap to change materials. The best options for car body work is 0.6mm MIG or TIG. Stainless is easy with TIG, or MMA in bigger sections. You need AC TIG for aluminium. I'd be wanting high frequency start for any TIG if you're a beginner.

There are lots of cheap Chinese machines around now. I'd be buying from a place that only sells welders, not Sydney Tools or Hare & Forbes. I'm not saying that well known brands aren't made in China, but you need the back up and support from the welding store.

Pulse MIG is great for aluminium welding, so you can lay down those coins. It makes it easy to weld without burning through. I wouldn't have that option high on the list if you're not doing long runs or production welding.

Going to be doing more SS than aluminium in the immediate future, so I'll drop the pulse from the list of reqs.

Do the multi-process welders do everything well.

Full understand buying from somewhere with support, I'm regional based and there's a number of good stores around me, it's just the total tools etc websites are better for browsers and getting a shortlist together with.

How are people finding Cigweld machines? Lots of people up this way use them

Cigweld Transmig 255i

vs for example Unimig and something like

RAZOR MULTI 230 AC/DC MIG/TIG/STICK Welder


Thinking about what Peter said above the Unimig Razor seems like the better machine

As for the body, yeah my two good welds yesterday were when the stick was about half length, so cutting them in half if using stick is worth keeping in mind.
My physio is so going to roll her eyes when she hears I need specific stretches for welding :ROFLMAO:
 

COL

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Thanks @PeterT
Good to know that stick is better than gasless MIG out in the paddock


Going to be doing more SS than aluminium in the immediate future, so I'll drop the pulse from the list of reqs.

Do the multi-process welders do everything well.

Full understand buying from somewhere with support, I'm regional based and there's a number of good stores around me, it's just the total tools etc websites are better for browsers and getting a shortlist together with.

How are people finding Cigweld machines? Lots of people up this way use them

Cigweld Transmig 255i

vs for example Unimig and something like

RAZOR MULTI 230 AC/DC MIG/TIG/STICK Welder


Thinking about what Peter said above the Unimig Razor seems like the better machine

As for the body, yeah my two good welds yesterday were when the stick was about half length, so cutting them in half if using stick is worth keeping in mind.
My physio is so going to roll her eyes when she hears I need specific stretches for welding :ROFLMAO:
I would look at the manufacturers websites and find the welder that best suits your needs then go to your local suppliers and negotiate your best price.
 

PeterT

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Most of what we do at work is with 0.8mm MIG, welding sections such as 50x50x3 RHS, up to 150x50x5 RHS. With a good machine you can weld car panels with 0.8mm. I doubt you'll never need 0.9mm wire. Thus I'd be spending money on HF start rather than the ability to weld 0.9mm or larger.
 

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Andrew Watkins

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Thanks @PeterT
Good to know that stick is better than gasless MIG out in the paddock


Going to be doing more SS than aluminium in the immediate future, so I'll drop the pulse from the list of reqs.

Do the multi-process welders do everything well.

Full understand buying from somewhere with support, I'm regional based and there's a number of good stores around me, it's just the total tools etc websites are better for browsers and getting a shortlist together with.

How are people finding Cigweld machines? Lots of people up this way use them

Cigweld Transmig 255i

vs for example Unimig and something like

RAZOR MULTI 230 AC/DC MIG/TIG/STICK Welder


Thinking about what Peter said above the Unimig Razor seems like the better machine

As for the body, yeah my two good welds yesterday were when the stick was about half length, so cutting them in half if using stick is worth keeping in mind.
My physio is so going to roll her eyes when she hears I need specific stretches for welding :ROFLMAO:
One other point about welding down the paddock. Think of what power supply you are using

I am still firmly in the tack and splatter league but splashed out on a moderately priced dedicated MIG(gas) a while ago. I also have a stick welder, but was eager to use the new toy.

I had to weld some arches up the block - too far for any lead - so had to use a generator. Thought „I wonder“ and asked my welding man about the choice, as I didn‘t want to fry the new toy.

His advice „don‘t even think about it. You risk frying the board“. So I used stick, which worked, however un prettily

What was noticeable was when striking the arc ( with a decent sized 8kVA portable generator ) how the motor laboured and almost stalled , then got down to business quite well. It was pretty clear that this phase risked power spikes through the machine.

There might be less of a problem with a high-end generator, but should this be factored into calculations? The ex[perts on the forum will know the answer to this one.

Good luck

Andrew
 
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