Project Grover

Demannu

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Going back to look at your transmission mods. Is the 4HP24 in the rangie electronic control, and is the gear selection still on a rod change?
Seeing as you've put a 505 bellhousing on, can you comment on the relative sizes of the rest of the body and output setup of a 4HP24 and the 4HP22 from a 505? Do you think it would be an issue using the electronic controlled box in a 505 (I've found a controller)?

Yes, the 4HP24 is electronically controlled. It has a manual gear selector rod that selects P/N/R/D, but once it's in D the computer takes over. With no input from the ECU, it defaults to third gear.

The 24 is 15mm longer than the 22, but the body is the same diameter.

I'd need a pull a 24 apart to confirm whether the 'back ends' are interchangeable. I suspect if you use the output shaft and extension housing, you should be right. On the Land Rovers, the part number for the rear housings are the same between the 22 and 24, I'll have to check the output shafts.

Any electronic controller should manage it OK, it is just a speed sensor and 4 solenoids - pressure control, TC lockup, and the two gear selector solenoids - which in combination give you 4 different gear selections.
 

Demannu

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If in doubt, use the biggest turbo you can get!
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The new turbo is a GT1749v. It's bigger, which would normally make it spool slower, but it's a VGT/VNT turbo, which should make it spool faster, so hopefully the two cancel each other out and it just makes more power!

I spent the weekend making the bracket for the water-air intercooler and roughing in the intercooler pipework.

I have had to machine out the exhaust manifold pretty significantly to match the new turbo as best I can. It is still not ideal. The factory RHZ exhaust manifold will definitely be the choke point for power from this engine. I think I might have to make a new tubular manifold for it at some point - but that is a low priority for now!
 

Matthew

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Cheap and functional / practical. Nasty all the same. Paint it to hide your cheapness away, lovely metallic colour.
 
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Steven King

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drove through the dust settling on the scene of a single vehicle accident on my way to town this arvo - tree impinging on passenger footwell, tailgate wiper still operating, people milling, calling it in, but nothing obviously serious .... almost ten minutes later, the firies arriving at their station in town were the first sign of a response.
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Horrifyingly flammable, P38s ... this must have been within 15 minutes; when i next got past, paint, panels and of course tyres all gone ...
you will carry an extinguisher, won't you?
 

Steven King

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i was wrong - apparently it was a 2002, sorry.
TA-2_2020-08-10_06-43-31-scaled.jpg

afraid it will end up fatal for the tree
 

Demannu

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It's definitely a P38, they were available until 2003.

That is a sad sight. I'm not sure the P38 is any more flammable than a car of the same era, but nonetheless, if in doubt, get out!

As a firefighter, I've seen a few cars go up, and yes it is amazing how quickly things escalate. But the same should be said for any modern house with modern furnishings...
 

Steven King

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Interesting to see the dissimilar metals, ie the door skins vs. bonnet ...
any better being diesel?
 
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DoubleChevron

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I work next door to a towing yard, and can confirm that I've seen a very wide range of cars with very poor fire outcomes. It doesn't seem to follow any pattern that would align with common wisdom for being more or less reliable.
Around here if follows the pattern of Ice Junkees being released on parole .... again after another round of punishment (aka: A stern talking too and a pat on the back of the hand by a magistrate). Oneday someone is going to catch the little shits in the act, and "just" punishment will be dealt out.

It would be good to know what a car has burnt from an accident though. In theory the impact switch should have shut down the fuel pump etc.
 

Demannu

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Interesting to see the dissimilar metals, ie the door skins vs. bonnet ...
any better being diesel?

Fuel systems are generally pretty durable, and don't tend to contribute much to an initial fire. The quantity of petrol or diesel in the engine bay is usually pretty insignificant.

Yeah, the aluminium panels on the P38 are great for weight saving (although on a 2.2t vehicle, obviously didn't achieve much), but not nearly as resiliant as steel in a fire. Not that it's going to be a problem.
 

Demannu

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It would be good to know what a car has burnt from an accident though. In theory the impact switch should have shut down the fuel pump etc.

I'd say electrical would be the biggest cause. Starter motor and alternator cables are unfused, and if damaged, will start quite a little fire.

Although I have attended one car fire where the passenger dropped their cigarette onto the carpet after what was really a minor impact (car could probably have been driven away), and forgot about it in the heat of the moment. Then the heat of the moment got a whole lot more intense.
 

jaahn

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Fuel systems are generally pretty durable, and don't tend to contribute much to an initial fire. The quantity of petrol or diesel in the engine bay is usually pretty insignificant.
-----
Hi :)
I might think that the plastic fuel lines will not help in any fire. Once the heat gets going the lines melt and then the fuel just runs out. When the fire gets to the plastic fuel tank it probably gets worser faster. ;) Who cares if it is petrol or diesel, just be a long way away I guess.
Jaahn
 

Demannu

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Finished the exhaust this evening. It's very quiet for a diesel, I think the V8 exhaust system is overkill for a small turbocharged engine. It has 3 large mufflers plus one catalytic converter (I removed the one for the other bank), and at the back is nearly silent. The front is a different matter!

Just little odds and ends to tidy up now! I still need to hook the crankcase breather back into the inlet, tidy up some wiring looms and finish the transmission controller. Hopefully I can take it for a proper test drive this weekend.
 

Demannu

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Hi :)
I might think that the plastic fuel lines will not help in any fire. Once the heat gets going the lines melt and then the fuel just runs out. When the fire gets to the plastic fuel tank it probably gets worser faster. ;) Who cares if it is petrol or diesel, just be a long way away I guess.
Jaahn

Since about the early '80s, all cars have had fuel feeds from the top of the tank, specifically so that the fuel doesn't pour out the bottom in case of damage to the hoses. So the maximum volume of fuel that can be spilled in case of damage to the lines is the volume in the lines.
 
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