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My new challenge - 1964 ID19F Safari

bleudanube

Member
Nicely done tank, Sven. What black are you using for the black parts - silk mat, half blank og blank? Looks blank but also silky to me. I am about the repaint tank, lid and floorboards on my car. As many others have said: Great to follow your well-illustrated and excitingly narrated process! Christian
I painted the tank in Satin Black and the radiator in Gloss Black. Just felt that matched the original and looked right. I will probably regret the gloss as it shows every little spec of dirt and prints...
 

Bundegaard

Member
I painted the tank in Satin Black and the radiator in Gloss Black. Just felt that matched the original and looked right. I will probably regret the gloss as it shows every little spec of dirt and prints...
Thanks. The D-fathers seem indeed originally to have envisioned some kind of difference between - perhaps - exposed black parts like the radiator, the lower part of the dashboard on the mid-period DS, floor pans perhaps as well, in the boot anyway, and then a more disguised Parts black like the fuel tank. The former gloss, the latter more matte - your satin being quite right, I think.
 

bleudanube

Member
Today's challenge was to repair the right hand “tusk”. It had a number of obvious holes, some easy to access, some hidden behind the cross brace and unknowingly also another large one behind the gear shift cable holder.

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I have been watching YouTube videos on panel forming, preferably without having to buy a lot of tools and machines - and I was able to put a few into practice today. So first I cut out the perforated section of the bottom closing panel... ouch, the cross brace panel was pretty well shot, not much left.

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After cutting all the bad parts out, drilling out spot welds and grinding off as much rust as I could, I started folding the sheet section. Most were easy.
The closing panel was surprisingly easy to make: I clamped a 12mm bar in between a couple of angles and then used a 10mm drill bit to hammer the ridge into it. It distorted a little but, but not a lot! Very happy with it.

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Welded the sections back in, spent hours grinding welds (does anyone have a faster way of doing this... just takes forever...) and rust proved the inside of the tusk.

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Didn't get it finished, so more on it next weekend. The passenger side tusk looks a little better. But it still has rust holes...

Sven
 
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bleudanube

Member
It has been slow going... have finished both “tusks” however over the past weeks. Removed the bottom plates, cut out as much rusty metal as required. Then painted the inside with rust converter, which will hope fully stop further decay.

Left:
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Right (amazing how much dirt and rust flakes came out of it!):
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In total I had to make up about a dozen patches, fabricate the bottom plates and weld it all back together. After grinding for hours and hours to clean up the welds, the sections look good, which is pleasing to see.

Have also drawn up the floor pan sections and given it to a fabricator who has the right bead roller. Getting a floor pan from Europe was just too expensive.
ordered the first lot of parts from the UK as well. Nice when new shiny stuff turn up - provides the motivation to keep cutting, welding and grinding...
 

ds21bvh

Member
Hi Sven,
Great work! The front horns are looking good.
Are you using a flapper wheel in a high speed grinder - this should be quite quick?
Kind regards,
Mark
 

DoubleChevron

Real cars have hydraulics
fantastic. I bet those extra numberplate holes are required for the swing down plate .... I think the early cars had a hinged plate so you could travel with the tailgate open and still have the numberplate displayed!

seeya,
Shane L.
 

bleudanube

Member
This weekend the right hand jacking point was the target. First I had to make up a small section on the adjacent panel that was rusted away. One thing I learnt is to weld the plug welds from underneath rather than in the inside of the fold. Easier to clean up!



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Also made up a template for the brace. Need it for the left hand side where the whole thing was gone and I wasn’t sure what it looked like. Now I know.
 

Attachments

bleudanube

Member
Geez, not sure what happened last night... I dropped out a couple of times out of Aussiefrogs, with messages showing that “resource limits have been reached”... and now my scribbles and photos are showing. What the...!?

Well, the photo sequences are a bit out, but I assume you get the gist of it - the jacking point is done and looks good. So the front bit of the chassis is done, now onto the next tricky bit: sills and floor pans. Then rear arches, then roof rails, then rear frame - and that’s only the chassis. Then doors, fenders, etc. all good fun! 2020 will be busy.
 

bleudanube

Member
Haven’t posted here for five weeks? Dropped off page 3 ... geez, time for a Christmas break update on the Safari!

after finishing the front right jacking point and the tusks/front, I commenced work on the rear - seemed an easier area than the sills and floors... might need a rotisserie to get proper access to that area. The main areas for rust are the top of the wheel arches where three panel sections come together and are finished off by a fourth that covers the lot. A great area for rot - as you can see. So I cut the lot out and started replacing the wheel housing panel, then the inside rear window frame. I then combined the outer window section and the 12mm ‘cover’ into one section. Took a bit of tricky folding to create the shape, but it fit surprisingly well at the end. To finish it off I plug welded the section from underneath, resembling the original look.

The inner window section didn’t come up as well as ai was hoping for - it seemed to be under tension, so when I cut out the rusty section it buckled somewhat. It will need a bit more work later on. But overall: happy with the result.

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Will post in smaller lots as I just got one of those weird Aussiefrogs error messages. Don’t want to lose the uploads.... bear with me.
 

Attachments

bleudanube

Member
Phew, was able to recover what I typed. Ok, back to the rear arch: it’s come up well, once the seam sealer is applied it will resemble the original look again.

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onto the right rear window frame. That’s even harder to fabricate - as I found out. The water sat under the window rubber for decades, so it was in bad shape in a couple of sections. Especially the right radius at the rear is a pain, too small to get even a worn grinding disk into it... anyway: instead of making up an inner and outer section, in folded up an upside down T- shape, cut slots into the web and bent it up. Worked ok-ish, but I am using a different method on the left... we will see what looks best in the end.

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bleudanube

Member
Next up was the rear floor box section. A couple of the cage nuts were completely rusted, so the bolts broke off or the nut started spinning in the cage - so only option: cut the two out and repair them. One cage was salvageable, the other one was knocked up quickly. But before I welded them back in I wanted to try my new rust converter gun to coat the box section internally. I used a long hose, shoved the 360 nozzle onto it and guided it through the section until the converted was well spread. Can only help to slow down further decay.

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All done, looking decent and in working order again.
 

bleudanube

Member
Onto the left hand wheel arch. Same issue as on the right - rust beneath the overlapping panels, but this time on a wider section and further towards the rear, having to work around the elephant ear...

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the left had been repaired before, some filler still in place. Once touched up it will blend in again.

fixed up the right hand seal holder as well as a small section on the right hand elephant ear’s seal holder. The right rear bump stop holder also needed fixing. It was rusted on the edges so the front section needed remanufacturing and adding back in.

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well, that’s all I was able to do in the past five weeks, holidays got a bit in the way, but it’s like eating an elephant: one bite at a time..

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Sven
 

bleudanube

Member
Good stuff! are you going to seam seal all these bits?
still learning how to do it by watching YouTube videos, but my thinking is that I will try to emulate the original seam sealer style, which would/ should cover all panel seams and joins, especially on the outside of the chassis. Some areas were done pretty sloppy/heavily by the French... :D I am sure I can copy that!

some of the areas where I welded in panels Will need a skim coat of filler, especially on the exposed surfaces that remain visible (inside above the wheel arches, rear lid, etc).
 

bleudanube

Member
And onto the left rear window frame and roof rails: all very similar to the right side. Rust holes under the window rubber, so cut them out, manufacture the section, weld it in and clean it up... simples!

i tried a different method of fabricating the seal flange: I welded in a flat plate and then welded a rib on... dont like the outcome. Still needs either cleaning up better (bought a die grinder, see whether that will reach into the radius ). If not I might have to redo that section.

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the seal holder and elephant ear clamping strips also needed replacing. Definitely one of the easier job and straight forward to create the sections.

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I have now started on the roof rail and will also need to address the upper window frame, which have a couple of rust sections as well. Shouldn’t be too hard to make them up and the rust holes are in the straight section.

the roof rail frame got bent at some stage, so with a bit of patience, hammer & dolly work and brute force it got all pulled back into the right shape. The rails have a number of bad outer sections, but all in all are pretty good.

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Might also be able to get my hands on a rotisserie - a colleague of mine has one that he hasn’t used - that will make the upcoming sill and floor work a lot easier... have been dreading it as most work would be upside down welding and grinding. Yuk.

Sven
 

badabec

Member
Hello, in the rear screen corner I too welded in a flat plate. Then I cut a piece to shape and silver soldered it into place. Silver solder is plenty strong enough and can be done with an ordinary blow-lamp. No blobs of weld to grind off.

Peter
 

bleudanube

Member
Another month has passed and progress has been slow. Spent time prepping my trusty 1983 Yamaha Xt600 Tenere for a 3000klm trip round Victoria and South Australia. Spent a week with 70 Tenere riders on a nice mix of dirt and bitumen roads - a great way to wind down, but... doesn’t get the Safari done, does it!? :rolleyes:

so, back onto it today - finishing the left rear upper window frame:

made up the sections, welded them in (upside down - hate it...) and ground it all back. Looks decent...

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Also found a guy who made up my two floor panels... finally! He had the right bead roller dies and he did a pretty good job. The panels are a little oil-canned, but I think that will pull out once they get welded in properly.

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next step is the rotisserie from a colleague. Have to bite the bullet and have a go at setting it up. Thinking about attaching it to the plates that I am using as the wheeled trolleys. There must be a way to use that setup as the rotisserie attachment points. Will report back soon.

Sven
 

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