Electric vehicle information:

Status
Not open for further replies.

JohnW

Too many posts!
I had no problems with it, it had Smiths oil and temp gauges in it when I got it. Oil pressure was 40 or 45 psi hot from memory. It was still buzzing at around locally for years after I traded it in.
Wrong place yes. :) Back in the 60s you could hear Morris Minors coming down the road by the big end rattle.
 

Ramaling

New member
No, nuclear power plants do not take 10 to 20 years to build. That is anti nuclear disinformation.
South Korea, China and Japan build theirs in average of 5 years. They have been constructed in as little as 3 years. Anything can take as long as you like if you want to make it so.
[/URL]
or here
[/URL]
or here
[/URL]

And let's not forget, things can happen faster if you prioritise them. Like, because you are trying to 'save' humanity and the planet.

No, capacity factor is not irrelevant to the consumer. The consumer is paying for the electricity, and that is proportionate to the cost of building the generator in relation to how much electricity it produces.. As the cost per unit of output isn't much higher with Hinkely Point C, than is estimated for possible future wind power, which of course takes into account future falling wind power costs, it makes no significant difference to the consumer.

Your afactual general statements also overlook an important point: Even if all the extra north sea wind farms are built, there will be times when none of them are producing electricity. As is well understood by everyone, the higher the % of intermittent sources in the mix, the more that is a problem. And it requires energy storage. Lots and lots of it. The cost of that energy storage, which in the case of the UK can only be chemical batteries or hydrogen, will be huge in itself, and I note that is not taken into account in the 'cost of power generation' fake comparisons.

Needless to say, single or few very large generators are very easy to connect to a grid; it involves few HT power lines and synchronisation is not a problem. But connecting thousands of geographically remote wind generators involves vast lengths of cabling, and synchronisation problems. In NSW, there are PV farms in the north west of the state technically operational but not connected to the grid, due to technical problems with synchronisation, I read. That is not to say it isn't possible, but the costs involved need to be added to the cost per unit of output, which tends to favor wind turbines when omitted.
;)
 

seasink

1000+ Posts
It was the 800 cc Austin engines in the Series II Minor that had big end bearing troubles. The cure was hardening the crankshaft and fitting harder bearings. Later cars like the 1000 and 1100 and Mini were better.
 

Haakon

1000+ Posts
Yeah, but that means you have it in the same sense you have the money on your credit card.
What do you mean, water rights? They actually use the water - lots and lots of it.

I agree we don’t have it to spare, the lignite mines for example depress the water table for 50kms around them…
 

JohnW

Too many posts!
It was the 800 cc Austin engines in the Series II Minor that had big end bearing troubles. The cure was hardening the crankshaft and fitting harder bearings. Later cars like the 1000 and 1100 and Mini were better.
Thanks for that. You're right, come to think of it. :)
 

JohnW

Too many posts!
What do you mean, water rights? They actually use the water - lots and lots of it.

I agree we don’t have it to spare, the lignite mines for example depress the water table for 50kms around them…
The water table drawdown from the lignite mines in Germany extends into Holland and they have plans for several decades of pumping from the Rhine to fill it all up again when mining is finished. And finish it will. They've already closed all the underground mines.

Yes, off topic I confess, so I'll stop now!
 

JohnW

Too many posts!
John,
Nuclear power and EV's are off topic on this website however for the record I have devoted the last decade to the pursuit of nuclear energy for Australia to address climate change.
There are at least five foundaries capable of making heat exchangers and reactor pressure vessels for large nuclear power plants. They are located in France, Russia, China, Japan and South Korea. There are many more if we use smaller nuclear power plants.
Yes, there is opposition in Australia but that occurs in many places. For the record, the fastest period of construction for a nuclear power plant was in Japan where they built a boiling water NPP in 36 months. The UAE went for start of consideration to completion of four plants at Barakah from 2009 to near completion in 2021. That's 5.6GW of power or about a quarter of our coal fleet.
I stand corrected about foundries - we should communicate off this page! :) I have checked the stats though (https://www.statista.com/statistics/712841/median-construction-time-for-reactors-since-1981/) and it seems a range of 4-9 years construction time is the experience, but I'd add the site seletion, environmental approvals and politics which I reckon would double it! Not that I'm an opponent. I'll send you a message.
 
Wind turbines are good for the planet.🙄
Hey wait a minute what's that tiny little bulldozer up to?😳
 

Attachments

  • Resized_20210621_203841.jpeg
    Resized_20210621_203841.jpeg
    487.8 KB · Views: 25
  • 20210623_111202.jpg
    20210623_111202.jpg
    236.4 KB · Views: 25

IWS

1000+ Posts
Wind turbines are good for the planet.🙄
Hey wait a minute what's that tiny little bulldozer up to?😳
Haakon has shared a good explanation of the disposal of damaged and un-repairable wind turbine blades. Here is some more - from Snopes:

"It is true that there is a landfill in Casper, Wyoming, that does accept decommissioned and damaged wind turbine blades and motors, both of which are not recyclable. However, it is important to highlight that up to 90% of a wind turbine is recyclable. That one-tenth of a windmill is not recyclable does not necessarily negate its overall green energy production over the course of its 20- to 25-year lifetime.


Nearly an entire wind turbine can be recycled with the exception of its blades, which are largely made of composite and fiberglass materials and built to withstand some of nature’s most destructive forces, making them very difficult to recycle or crush in the first place. Because the average wind turbine in the United States measures about 280 feet tall, they are prone to environmental and natural damage, such as normal weathering from storm systems with high winds and hail, lightning strikes, and birds. Many wind farms will employ blade service technicians to repair damaged blades. However, when the cost of a repair outweighs its benefit — or the blade is simply not salvageable — they are disposed of in a variety of ways, including being buried.

“Wind farms repurpose and recycle 90% of all the materials in a wind turbine; the only material not recyclable is fiberglass; the blades and motor housing are the only fiberglass components,” note Casper city records."

Ian.
 
The brown coal mines in the LaTrobe Valley are shallow surface deposits and require no major de-watering. Unlike the deposits in the South East of South Australia that have not been mined for that reason.
There have been seven series of wind towers installed in Victoria. The first types suffered overheating and are not generating. There is a proposal to take down failed wind generators and repair them in the old Ford factory in Geelong but it's expensive and does not attract the $300000 government subsidy of a new installation. Wind generators have double windings. When there is no wind they draw power from the grid to turn the blades as it takes too much wind to start a stopped blade. It shows up in the figures as a minus number. The housing on the latest generators is much bigger to allow for better cooling.
SA has a wind generator capacity of 2142 MW, NSW 2141MW and Vic 3105MW. Output ranges from zero to around 90% of plated capacity but AEMO estimates an average of 30 to 35% of capacity. Today Victoria has series of cold fronts and is generating at over 60% capacity which is around the best we get. Last week it was virtually nothing for two days. BOM issues wind maps and wind predictions. Variations in wind output are countered by increasing or decreasing the take from Snowy Hydro although it has a limited output. Victoria always uses hydro to cope with the evening peaks in Melbourne.
 

schlitzaugen

1000+ Posts
I was staying out of this..... We've run a high energy reactor at Lucas Heights for decades to the point where the suburbs have spread around it. It would be a slow business, should anyone feel like coughing up the billions, given the community resistance, approvals processes and availability of competent contractors. I don't remotely believe the "5-10 years is possible" argument. A few years ago, there was only one foundry on the planet (in Japan) capable of building reactor caps, and the wait for one of those is an issue in itself, once you have decided what capacity you build.

I am serious. I don't think we are any less capable of running a nuclear reactor safely than any other nation you care to mention.

The reactor at Lucas Heights is not for producing energy, it is for research and medical (and other) purposes. Different story.

As for impediments, I think what we lack is the political will, which is not representative of the population will. That story with public opposition etc., is more myth than truth. I am afraid we'll soon see the difference if the rest of the planet decides to impose some penalty on our exports/imports because we don't tax /deal with greenhouse gas/other pollution and when we'll learn what the real price of fossil fuels is, we'll quickly change our view of nuclear. It is just depressing to see (again) that we are followers (and coerced, at that) when we could be leaders.

As for the Japanese being the only suppliers of something or other, I simply don't buy it. I don't think Russia or China or whatever other countries you care to name would care to depend on Japan.
 

Haakon

1000+ Posts
The brown coal mines in the LaTrobe Valley are shallow surface deposits and require no major de-watering. Unlike the deposits in the South East of South Australia that have not been mined for that reason.
There have been seven series of wind towers installed in Victoria. The first types suffered overheating and are not generating. There is a proposal to take down failed wind generators and repair them in the old Ford factory in Geelong but it's expensive and does not attract the $300000 government subsidy of a new installation. Wind generators have double windings. When there is no wind they draw power from the grid to turn the blades as it takes too much wind to start a stopped blade. It shows up in the figures as a minus number. The housing on the latest generators is much bigger to allow for better cooling.
SA has a wind generator capacity of 2142 MW, NSW 2141MW and Vic 3105MW. Output ranges from zero to around 90% of plated capacity but AEMO estimates an average of 30 to 35% of capacity. Today Victoria has series of cold fronts and is generating at over 60% capacity which is around the best we get. Last week it was virtually nothing for two days. BOM issues wind maps and wind predictions. Variations in wind output are countered by increasing or decreasing the take from Snowy Hydro although it has a limited output. Victoria always uses hydro to cope with the evening peaks in Melbourne.
Latrobe Valley lignite mines are pumped 24/7 to keep groundwater intrusion under control.
I don’t know if you’ve seen them in person, they’re not “shallow”!!
 
ffs, not that crap again...

I'm aware of the purported differences.

I recently watched (and got stuck behind going to work) 1200 odd semi loads of wind turbine components going past my house for the Coopers Gap farm. I guess in 20 years or so there will be 1200 odd trucks heading the other way?

Rosie's video talks about the 15 tons of highly visible blade waste per turbine, yet the 1500 tons of concrete and reo in the foundation, most of which just gets dozed over, doesn't rate a mention in the calculations. Out of sight of out of mind. It's still landfill isn't it even if it doesn't actually get transported anywhere?
 
Latrobe Valley lignite mines are pumped 24/7 to keep groundwater intrusion under control.
I don’t know if you’ve seen them in person, they’re not “shallow”!!
I certainly have. I know what deep and shallow mean in mining and what major de-watering looks like.
Australians can run power stations, the SEC was great, Energie is French and hopeless.
Russia is again a major producer of nuclear plants. The floating nuclear power station design just installed at a Siberian port is being offered to commercial buyers with difficult locations.
Dead windmills may never be removed. The profit is the government subsidy to install and the government dictated power supply contracts that favour them. Landholders who ignored the protests of their neighbors and took the annual payments that were $10000 per year and now reportedly much more will find their properties seriously devalued. There are large ground works at any windfarm site.
 

Kim Luck

1000+ Posts
I certainly have. I know what deep and shallow mean in mining and what major de-watering looks like.
Australians can run power stations, the SEC was great, Energie is French and hopeless.
Russia is again a major producer of nuclear plants. The floating nuclear power station design just installed at a Siberian port is being offered to commercial buyers with difficult locations.
Dead windmills may never be removed. The profit is the government subsidy to install and the government dictated power supply contracts that favour them. Landholders who ignored the protests of their neighbors and took the annual payments that were $10000 per year and now reportedly much more will find their properties seriously devalued. There are large ground works at any windfarm site.

How's your electric tractor going, Russell?
https://www.crediblecarbon.com/news...cles-set-to-revolutionise-agriculture-sector/
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top