Electric vehicle information:

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JohnW

Too many posts!
Complicated business, isn't it? There's little doubt that EVs are going to become dominant in many places and they already do almost everything I do quite easily. The capital cost rules them right out for me at present, plus my preference for depreciated, secondhand buying meaning I'd acquire a declining battery capacity. It'll be different in the future, AND we'll have more energy from renewables.

Thanks for this link.
 
A good American or Australian electric motor will last many years on a pump, Chinese pumps were good value for a while but now they do a line in crap motors. When a petrol motor doesn't fire there are things you do, when a electric just sits there that's it. I know just enough to stop me poking it with a screwdriver. I use a lot of pumps and now I miss the Aussie Betts motors. It's cured me of buying on the internet. So if you have an electric car you need a quality motor. The motors on the shearing plants last forever.
 

Kim Luck

1000+ Posts
A good American or Australian electric motor will last many years on a pump, Chinese pumps were good value for a while but now they do a line in crap motors. When a petrol motor doesn't fire there are things you do, when a electric just sits there that's it. I know just enough to stop me poking it with a screwdriver. I use a lot of pumps and now I miss the Aussie Betts motors. It's cured me of buying on the internet. So if you have an electric car you need a quality motor. The motors on the shearing plants last forever.

As have the motors on the "W" class trams and those powering the Tait Trains or "Red Rattlers"..................
 

Haakon

1000+ Posts
A good American or Australian electric motor will last many years on a pump, Chinese pumps were good value for a while but now they do a line in crap motors. When a petrol motor doesn't fire there are things you do, when a electric just sits there that's it. I know just enough to stop me poking it with a screwdriver. I use a lot of pumps and now I miss the Aussie Betts motors. It's cured me of buying on the internet. So if you have an electric car you need a quality motor. The motors on the shearing plants last forever.
Lol. Let’s just say your pump motor has about as much bearing on EV motors as a Massey Ferguson has on a Veyron ;)

 
VR only ever ran one electric freight line, down to West Gippsland. They had a fleet of L Class English Electrics that were well past their use by date in the 1970's. They lived in the Melbourne freight yard. They were never replaced and at some time the electric overheads taken down. I think they only powered goods trains, mainly coal. The first diesel electrics of 1953 were B Class engines one of which was still in service a decade ago but developed chassis cracks. I don't know what their overhaul schedule was or that of the electric trains but they had one. Newport could handle anything. There was a lot of skill and knowledge lost when Victorian Railways was sent on a path of decline.
SEC run Ballarat/Bendigo trams were made in Adelaide, early 1920's, still a handful running.
Electric motors are electric motors and children sitting at the feet of their tech gods like Musk will find that their new toys will serve well but will not be fault free and will need both repairs and maintenance over time. The Chinese successfully demonstrate that electric powered machines are not necessarily fault free or reliable. Some of their electric cars have a terrible reputation. Much chatter in the engineering world about fault levels in new Chinese train motors.
 
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JoBo

1000+ Posts
Has anybody calculated how much electricity infrastructure will be required (cost,time) when every ICE is replaced by an electric one. No doubt it can be done .... As it stands we struggle to have enough supply on certain days?
 

Haakon

1000+ Posts
Has anybody calculated how much electricity infrastructure will be required (cost,time) when every ICE is replaced by an electric one. No doubt it can be done .... As it stands we struggle to have enough supply on certain days?
Yes, the AEMO has modelled it extensively. It’s not that big a deal.
 

RINGER

Member
Has anybody calculated how much electricity infrastructure will be required (cost,time) when every ICE is replaced by an electric one. No doubt it can be done .... As it stands we struggle to have enough supply on certain days?
Some states in particular currently have real issues & rely on Qld. coal fired generators!
Then we'll have the same old rhetoric we heard about Qld. hospitals not too long ago~ 'Qld power is for Queensland residents'

What happens with electric vehicles when power is out for weeks?

Yes, the AEMO has modelled it extensively. It’s not that big a deal.
How about a direct link, I didn't find anything ~
 

JohnW

Too many posts!
Some states in particular currently have real issues & rely on Qld. coal fired generators!
Then we'll have the same old rhetoric we heard about Qld. hospitals not too long ago~ 'Qld power is for Queensland residents'

What happens with electric vehicles when power is out for weeks?


How about a direct link, I didn't find anything ~
Actually, when the power is out, petrol stations can't operate either. They can't even pump if they have a computer failure, let alone a power failure. The Brits have virtually stopped coal-fired power generation from about 40% I think in the last 10-20 years. The Germans, Brits, French and Belgians have all shut down their deep black coal mining, not for want of a resource down there. I honestly think the writing is clearly on the wall for coal. Steaming coal first. And for metallurgical coal, there's quite a bit going on quietly about replacing carbon as the reducing agent by hydrogen. We're comfortably buffered from it at present, but if you go searching times are a'changin'. I don't think we'll see any more coal stations built in Oz.

What I DO wonder about is country power infrastructure. A fast charging station will need quite a lot of power to handle cars by the dozen.
 
Coal is being phased out in Europe in favor of gas but as Russia is an increasingly important gas source and Nord Stream 2 controversial the Poles are unhappy about moving away from coal. Asia has massive investment in coal fired power but the Chinese seek to punish Australia so we may lose that market to an eager Russia which is ramping up Siberian coal production. There are also pipelines from the Siberian gas fields being constructed to China. The Americans are keen to supply LNG to Europe but it's more expensive than Russian gas. Perspectives on energy change if the winter is cold and emergency LNG supplies have to be brought in. So Australian coal will still have Asian buyers but China is in doubt for us. The French of course have their nuclear generators. Gas is everywhere and there are plans to pipe it to Europe from as far away as the Gulf.
Thatcher closed the British coal industry in the 1970's. Polish coal was cheaper.
 
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Haakon

1000+ Posts
What I DO wonder about is country power infrastructure. A fast charging station will need quite a lot of power to handle cars by the dozen.
The reality is very very few cars will be using fast charging - the vast majority of charging is done at home overnight when grid demand is low.

The model of needing to visit public infrastructure every time you need fuel doesn't really apply to an electrified fleet.
 

RINGER

Member
Hinkley Point C, currently under construction in Somerset, is the first nuclear power station to be built in the UK for more than 20 years. It will have the capacity to generate safe, reliable, low-carbon electricity; enough to power around 6 million homes over an anticipated lifespan of 60 years.
Brits [new nuclear] & Germans [Russian gas] have it all under control as do the French [nuclear] & Belgians ~ not sure why some come out of the woodwork every time EV's are discussed as supposed experts when, AU has the landmass of the whole of the continental USA & population of TX minus the ongoing influx from the south.
 

Haakon

1000+ Posts
Brits [new nuclear] & Germans [Russian gas] have it all under control as do the French [nuclear] & Belgians ~ not sure why some come out of the woodwork every time EV's are discussed as supposed experts when, AU has the landmass of the whole of the continental USA & population of TX minus the ongoing influx from the south.
Hinkley (aside from being many years late) is 24 Billion pounds for 3200MW capacity. It’s so expensive the government has had to guarantee/subsidise the power price at a rate far above the average wholesale price that is driven by the cheap offshore wind farms.

It’s very expensive electricity….
 
But as the British found in winter when they had to buy emergency tanker loads of LNG wind power that only works sometimes is worthless and a huge cost to the country.
 

Kim Luck

1000+ Posts
But as the British found in winter when they had to buy emergency tanker loads of LNG wind power that only works sometimes is worthless and a huge cost to the country.

I'd suggest you look at the windfarms planned and under construction, not only around the UK, but the whole of Europe. Coal fired power seems to go offline just as often.
 
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