Coolant for a 2010 Koleos petrol engine

pugwash

1000+ Posts
for what its worth ,my son wrecked a couple cars with Renault diesel motors [ Suzuki GrandVitara] same motor as a traffic sept north south ,a local mobile mechanic bought some parts off us ,he said he had a customer who had a car[ grand vitara diesel] , that was filled with the wrong coolant and he had to replace all of the plastic bits[ radiator end tanks t/stat housing ,etc,] in the cooling system ,as said coolant had reacted with ,these bits made them brittle ,he said only use red coolant ,he noticed the colour of the header tank when removing parts ,,told me the story .i have no reason to disbelieve him .PUGS maybe it was a coincidence
 
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85Fuego

Member
Maybe.

The problem is there are so many reports of manufacturers that have used plastics in their coolant system with the correct coolant having bits fail as well.

BMW springs to mind.
 

Kim Luck

1000+ Posts
Maybe.

The problem is there are so many reports of manufacturers that have used plastics in their coolant system with the correct coolant having bits fail as well.

BMW springs to mind.

The thought crossed my mind when I read your post that most modern manufacturers do not use a metal or glass expansion tank (any more) and that they are usually made from, wait for it, plastic. So now I'm curious, what in fact in a BMW cooling system is made from plastic and fails? Radiator? Water pump? Thermostat? Heater core? Valving? What is it and how does the correct coolant affect it?
 

jo proffi

1000+ Posts
Hi Jo I commented on my useless local dealer and this is an example. They would not sell me the coolant without checking the VIN on the computer. But as you said all Renault models have the same stuff ????? :mad: I asked how many different coolants there were and they said one !

I do believe the major difference for the type D is the european idea that you make things to last longer and minimise the waste of constant changing parts etc and the end product is to be as friendly as possible instead of a harmful substance.
Bedford I will PM you. :cool:
Jaahn
In that case, take the piss by walking outside, photographing the windscreen display vin from one of the cars in the yard and come back inside and quote that. :moon:

I previously came across that attitude when I ran the fuego and order Clio parts that still fitted.
Luckily my local dealer's spare parts section are staffed by competent spare parts people so we soon moved on from the vin bit.

Jo
 

Kim Luck

1000+ Posts
In that case, take the piss by walking outside, photographing the windscreen display vin from one of the cars in the yard and come back inside and quote that. :moon:

I previously came across that attitude when I ran the fuego and order Clio parts that still fitted.
Luckily my local dealer's spare parts section are staffed by competent spare parts people so we soon moved on from the vin bit.

Jo

Ever heard of a thing in manufacturing called a "Break Point"? That is why Vin numbers can be important, especially if the breakpoint involved a major change of equipment. Possibly even coolant! ;)
 

85Fuego

Member
So now I'm curious, what in fact in a BMW cooling system is made from plastic and fails? Radiator? Water pump? Thermostat? Heater core? Valving? What is it and how does the correct coolant affect it?
Easy google: 'bmw plastic coolant fittings failing' and the world is your oyster.

No mechanical engineer (yet), however, it appears that the thermosetting plastics have a finite number of heat cycles in them and are prone to fail early.

This problem is far too common on all models since the early 90’s and is what BMW refers to as “plastic embrittlement”. The plastic has heated up and cooled down enough times to create a brittle condition in the plastic of the radiator.

From:
Bavarian Machine Specialties

Unless you do an analysis on plastic fittings and coolant, all we have are the reports to go by.
I know all my cars from the mid 90's have variations of the same plastic idiocy from: Ford, VW, Renault, BMW.
 

Kim Luck

1000+ Posts
Easy google: 'bmw plastic coolant fittings failing' and the world is your oyster.

No mechanical engineer (yet), however, it appears that the thermosetting plastics have a finite number of heat cycles in them and are prone to fail early.

This problem is far too common on all models since the early 90’s and is what BMW refers to as “plastic embrittlement”. The plastic has heated up and cooled down enough times to create a brittle condition in the plastic of the radiator.

From:
Bavarian Machine Specialties

Unless you do an analysis on plastic fittings and coolant, all we have are the reports to go by.
I know all my cars from the mid 90's have variations of the same plastic idiocy from: Ford, VW, Renault, BMW.

Every single one of the sites associated with your posts are non genuine BMW repairers. Your quote in red ink is simply someone's opinion and not necessarily correct. Idiocy is not something practiced by motor manufacturers since the days of the Chevvy Corvair and the Ford Pinto. Except perhaps with the issue of an autopilot in a Tesla, but that is not a real car. I have no ambition to own a BMW and have been very happy with a steady supply of new Renaults over 54 years. Plastic embrittlement? What is that? Les Frogs have been at the forefront of chemical engineering of things like plastic and resins since the end of WW2. Fibreglass anyone?
 

seasink

1000+ Posts
Your question, Schlitz. There is a paper here that describes the ingredients of the Renault type D fluid: http://www.scientificbulletin.upb.ro/rev_docs_arhiva/full40375.pdf
The glaceol D and glaceol A cooling liquids used as corroding medium in
the present research contain the same basic component with antifreeze vocation,
namely the monoethylen glycol (MEG) . The organic corrosion inhibitor used in
glaceol D consisted of a derivative azole namely TTA 5-(p-tolyl)-1,3,4-triazole.
The inorganic inhibitor used in glaceol A was the sodium tetraborate Na 2 B 4 O 7
.5H 2 O (borax).
The principal authors are Romanian.
 
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JohnW

Too many posts!
Every single one of the sites associated with your posts are non genuine BMW repairers. Your quote in red ink is simply someone's opinion and not necessarily correct. Idiocy is not something practiced by motor manufacturers since the days of the Chevvy Corvair and the Ford Pinto. Except perhaps with the issue of an autopilot in a Tesla, but that is not a real car. I have no ambition to own a BMW and have been very happy with a steady supply of new Renaults over 54 years. Plastic embrittlement? What is that? Les Frogs have been at the forefront of chemical engineering of things like plastic and resins since the end of WW2. Fibreglass anyone?
We might comment on the Dreamliner too. Made of composite materials. Nothing lasts forever but nothing broke on our 306 in 22 years, ditto on the Citroen BX. The "plastic" (composite really I think) on that range of PSA vehicles were a bit prone to being broken by rough handling when a couple of decades old. The aluminium bits, including engine blocks, were a bit prone to corrosion due to inadequate coolant changes.....
 

85Fuego

Member
Every single one of the sites associated with your posts are non genuine BMW repairers. Your quote in red ink is simply someone's opinion and not necessarily correct. Idiocy is not something practiced by motor manufacturers since the days of the Chevvy Corvair and the Ford Pinto.
You asked for links/info I gave you a link.
You're fingers work just as well as mine.

Repeated heating cooling WILL degrade polymers, as well as stress from pressure changes, it's just a matter of time.
So we're going to start arguing now?

Just because they're not genuine repairers doesn't mean they can't see a problem.

You think manufacturers don't care about fabrication/production costs?
You think they will send a silver service mechanic around to fix your car?

Where do you see this in a blog:
"the beemer/benz/hyundai/renault etc keeps breaking down even with factory servicing, but I STIIIILLLLL love it.....' ?
 

schlitzaugen

1000+ Posts
colour is irrelevant.
Jo
Yes, true, but I found a webpage where it was explained that all D-Type coolant was green (by manufacturer choice, I guess). I did find a Penrite (?) coolant, which was said to be Type D (there was no evidence of that - picture was generic and no further details were given) and it was red. Could be that the webpage mentioned above was describing type D coolant sold in Europe (it was a UK page).

Thank you seasink, that's what I was looking for.
 

Kim Luck

1000+ Posts
You asked for links/info I gave you a link.
You're fingers work just as well as mine.

Repeated heating cooling WILL degrade polymers, as well as stress from pressure changes, it's just a matter of time.
So we're going to start arguing now?

Just because they're not genuine repairers doesn't mean they can't see a problem.

You think manufacturers don't care about fabrication/production costs?
You think they will send a silver service mechanic around to fix your car?

Where do you see this in a blog:
"the beemer/benz/hyundai/renault etc keeps breaking down even with factory servicing, but I STIIIILLLLL love it.....' ?

The only time I've had any kind of silver service mechanic in the last twenty three years was when a TDC sensor went on the blink in my RX4. The RACV took my car to the Renault dealer on a flatbed, I was picked up by a courtesy car a couple of hours later to go and pick it up under warranty. I might add that occasion was the one and only time enjoyment of my Renaults was interrupted by a fault of any kind in the last 23 years of ownership. As evidenced by the low number of posts overall on late model Renault failures.
 
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Bedford

New member
From Renault dealer. $30 do not dilute.
 

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