‘74 DS Resto

KAndy

New member
Might not be too bad once you cleaned it all up - they always look horrible at first. 😬👍. Was it using a lot of oil?
I only had her briefly before parking and pulling her apart, it ran well and but had an oil leak.
I think the leak may have been less than the top ups…
The sight under the rocker cover was quite confronting
Anyhow, I’ll apply lots of old rags and elbow grease and see how it comes up…
7F5BB62F-9DC6-4343-A65C-0A7AA87B88A7.jpeg
 

bleudanube

Member
Frank at Headspec in Clayton did mine. Besides it taking forever (3months of pestering) he did a good job (well, I hope so, haven’t run the car yet, but it looked good - cost was about $1000).

He put in new valve seats and guides, welded up the water galleries that were corroded, skimmed and tested.

Sven
 

robo

Member
Frank at Headspec in Clayton did mine. Besides it taking forever (3months of pestering) he did a good job (well, I hope so, haven’t run the car yet, but it looked good - cost was about $1000).

He put in new valve seats and guides, welded up the water galleries that were corroded, skimmed and tested.

Sven
Hi Sven, I saw your head at Headspec when I dropped my 6 cylinder one off, it’s been 3 months now so it should be nearly done.
 

KAndy

New member
Where (if at all) did you get it refurbished?
Didn’t, I cleaned it up carefully, had a long hard look at it. Then ran some very fine wet and dry on a flat plane around it, lay a flat edge around it looking for gaps, wire brushed out the coolant deposits, cleaned it again…
Looked ok and I have all my fingers and toes 🤞….
 

KAndy

New member
What's the valve story? Are you going to have to pull the head again at some point down the line?
I really hope not to 😳
Broke an Exhaust valve on disassembly (looked like it was on the way out so vlucky), have a brief post on it ( look up ‘Bustard- inlet valve’) all good now got a fresh set from a frogger. New seals and gaskets also, should be ok. This is my first time doing this job so… time will tell
 

KAndy

New member
Gents, I’m wrestling with the serious stuff now, two reluctant pieces I can’t seem to budge;
1/ the oil pump is reluctant to be removed, and
2/ I can’t get my head around how to remove the piston liners.
With the oil pump I’ve removed the grub screw and the securing bolt - but it won’t budge.
The piston (I've only attempted No1) comes out cleanly (unbolted from camshaft and pushed through) but the liner is stuck fast. How much force is acceptable to apply, no amount of gentle persuasion has budged it so far.
I’d appreciate your advice. Tks
 

faulksy

Member
Theoretically, the liners are only a friction fit into the block. Maybe try some heat or a bigger hammer. They should pull out from the top fairly easily unless rusted in place or someone has glued them in.
 
It's fairly easy to make up a liner puller. Take a plate of rigid material (1/4" aluminium plate is good. Softer than the block/liner) and cut it so you have a disc of just under the liner bottom outer diameter (i.e. a fraction under the liner seat diameter), cut a strip off each side (enough to let you slip it down the bore and under the liner), drill a hole in the middle to take at least a 1/2" Bunnings threaded rod, sit a block of hardwood (drilled to take the threaded rod) on top four bolts screwed in where the head studs normally reside and use the threaded rod to pull it out of the block. No beating the life out of parts his way. You'd be surprised how this will free stuck liners, but make your life as easy as possible by cleaning and adding penetrating fluid. By cutting the strip off the sides off the disc, you can insert it down the bore and remove the liner without having to pull the crankshaft out. If you decide to beat the life out of the liners, strike you hammer or mallet on a length of hardwood.

The oil pump is driven off the camshaft and the diagram is below. Have you removed #3+#33 and bolt #32?
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KAndy

New member
It's fairly easy to make up a liner puller. Take a plate of rigid material (14" aluminium plate is good. Softer than the block/liner) and cut it so you have a disc of just under the liner bottom outer diameter (i.e. a fraction under the liner seat diameter), cut a strip off each side (enough to let you slip it down the bore and under the liner), drill a hole in the middle to take at least a 1/2" Bunnings threaded rod, sit a block of hardwood (drilled to take the threaded rod) on top four bolts screwed in where the head studs normally reside and use the threaded rod to pull it out of the block. No beating the life out of parts his way. You'd be surprised how this will free stuck liners, but make your life as easy as possible by cleaning and adding penetrating fluid. By cutting the strip off the sides off the disc, you can insert it down the bore and remove the liner without having to pull the crankshaft out. If you decide to beat the life out of the liners, strike you hammer or mallet on a length of hardwood.

The oil pump is driven off the camshaft and the diagram is below. Have you removed #3+#33 and bolt #32?
View attachment 136184
thanks David, yes I have removed #3+#33 and bolt #32.
It’s still firmly stuck and I’m not keen on bashing it too much.
My manual suggest (see below), which is consistent with your advice.
And thanks, knocking up a sleeve extraction toll this weekend, see how I go…
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Considering the amount of cooked oil on the head, it's probably stuck in. Try soaking where it fits in the inverted block with carby cleaner and turning back and forth, perhaps using a strap wrench on the pump body. It should turn back and forth at least a little, which is why the grub screw with a point is there to lock it in the correct angular position.
 
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