Tool Talk - Page 83
  • Register
  • Help
Page 83 of 84 First ... 3373798081828384 Last
Results 2,051 to 2,075 of 2099
Like Tree554Likes

Thread: Tool Talk

  1. #2051
    Too many posts! JohnW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Perth, WA, Australia
    Posts
    10,891

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beano View Post
    Indeed....reading that, I feel a bit odd inside. Mind you, some handymen in Thailand use them with serrated saw blades, and of course the guard is just a hindrance....
    I don't doubt it. Don't start me about arc welding in back-street workshops in Pakistan! I've seen them for myself....

    Advertisement
    JohnW

    Renault 4CV 1951
    Renault R8 1965
    Renault Scenic 2005 (wife's)
    Renault Scenic 2007 (mine)
    Renault Scenic 2006 (daughter's)
    CitroŽn CX Pallas 1980

    National Co-ordinator, Renault 4CV Register of Australia

  2. #2052
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Newcastle
    Posts
    2,662

    Default

    Hi
    Sorry about mentioning that sitting on the grinder. But those Fein 9" grinders were powerful, 3HP by memory, and you had to have both hands firmly holding them when you switched them on ! Else they could spin out of control.
    Actually strange that someone talked about using a blade in one. That is how I started fixing them. A workmate was using one to do some rennovations at home and it failed. So he knew I could fix it and bought it in. Looked savage with the blade He had borrowed it from his brothers workshop. So one thing lead to another and I started fixing the other dead gear he had.
    I used one of the Feins to cut the arse off a Subaru that had been hit in the rear and weld another on to it. Much too heavy to use like that of course but cut it off no problems in quick time. One of the first model Subaru to be sold here. A 2WD coupe I bought at auction for peanuts.
    Jaahn
    Kenfuego likes this.

  3. #2053
    bob
    bob is offline
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Skipton
    Posts
    2,412

    Default Makita update....

    G'day,

    had a chat to the repairer that had previously had my saw for six weeks - Makita 1017L, see earlier postings.

    Seems it had been at the repair place for so long because they couldn't fault it. He assured me it was quite common with the breed, and also for the retailer, Bunnings, for intermittent faults to develop as, bluntly, we are generally looking at the cheapest possible construction...

    With a new item it is doubly hard to spot trouble points as little service means no localised overheating tell-tale marks to highlight poor connections, the usual problem. Seems that the manufacturer has developed all sorts of maybe no so clever ways of dispensing with bolted/welded/soldered connections with clips and pointy things that are really not meant to last a long time...

    So, went to try the mongrel before loading it into the boot again, and, of course, the bugger runs !! All a learning process.

    cheers,
    Bob

  4. #2054
    COL
    COL is offline
    A110 COL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Van Diemen's Land
    Posts
    4,116

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bob View Post
    G'day,

    had a chat to the repairer that had previously had my saw for six weeks - Makita 1017L, see earlier postings.

    Seems it had been at the repair place for so long because they couldn't fault it. He assured me it was quite common with the breed, and also for the retailer, Bunnings, for intermittent faults to develop as, bluntly, we are generally looking at the cheapest possible construction...

    With a new item it is doubly hard to spot trouble points as little service means no localised overheating tell-tale marks to highlight poor connections, the usual problem. Seems that the manufacturer has developed all sorts of maybe no so clever ways of dispensing with bolted/welded/soldered connections with clips and pointy things that are really not meant to last a long time...

    So, went to try the mongrel before loading it into the boot again, and, of course, the bugger runs !! All a learning process.

    cheers,
    Bob
    When it fails next time Bob take a little video with your phone explaining the problem. Make sure you show that its plugged in and switch on, also show some other appliance works in that power outlet.

    I have done this for things that I have bought online and have not worked as promised.
    Kenfuego likes this.
    Regards Col

    1973 Renault R12 Station Wagon
    1976 Renault R12 Station Wagon
    2002 Renault Laguna V6
    1973 Alpine A110

    http://alpine-a110.weebly.com/

  5. #2055
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Newcastle
    Posts
    2,662

    Default

    Hi bob,
    Years ago I had a B&D drill I was given, that never worked out of the box. I complained to the company direct and they just sent me another one. Some time later I pulled it apart and discovered that the wires between the parts were not crimped or connected like the past but were bared and just "plugged in" to brass 'clips' during assembly. One had missed and was off the side. Possibly made contact for testing ! Easy fix for a second drill. I guess they just allowed for a small number to fail and just sent another.
    Perhaps you could give yours a bit of impact therapy and see if it makes a difference ! Or write direct to the agents.
    Jaahn

  6. #2056
    bob
    bob is offline
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Skipton
    Posts
    2,412

    Default more Makita...

    G'day,

    the saga continues....

    Went to use the saw on Sat morning, 11 degrees in the shed. Nope, it wasn't getting out of bed, so I bathed it with the hot air gun for a few minutes but without result. In the afternoon we managed to get to 18, hey, the saw is alive....

    This morning we are at 10 degrees, the saw is inactive again.

    Could be a pattern developing here. I'd reckon that the repairman would never find the fault with this saw in his air-conditioned workshop - unless of course he had a cool room....

    cheers,
    Bob
    Kenfuego likes this.

  7. #2057
    COL
    COL is offline
    A110 COL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Van Diemen's Land
    Posts
    4,116

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bob View Post
    G'day,

    the saga continues....

    Went to use the saw on Sat morning, 11 degrees in the shed. Nope, it wasn't getting out of bed, so I bathed it with the hot air gun for a few minutes but without result. In the afternoon we managed to get to 18, hey, the saw is alive....

    This morning we are at 10 degrees, the saw is inactive again.

    Could be a pattern developing here. I'd reckon that the repairman would never find the fault with this saw in his air-conditioned workshop - unless of course he had a cool room....

    cheers,
    Bob
    Sounds like a bad connection there that is dependant on temperature. Maybe you should explain that to the fella at the service shop and he maybe able to find it with a can of rapid freeze.
    Kenfuego likes this.
    Regards Col

    1973 Renault R12 Station Wagon
    1976 Renault R12 Station Wagon
    2002 Renault Laguna V6
    1973 Alpine A110

    http://alpine-a110.weebly.com/

  8. #2058
    bob
    bob is offline
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Skipton
    Posts
    2,412

    Default

    G'day,

    Quote Originally Posted by COL View Post
    Sounds like a bad connection there that is dependant on temperature. Maybe you should explain that to the fella at the service shop and he maybe able to find it with a can of rapid freeze.
    sure does, but it didn't do anything after a few minutes with the heat gun. Suggests to me that the whole bulk of the thing has to be over a certain temperature before it's happy, maybe the same with instant freeze cans.

    To find the fault will probably cost more that the saw is worth. Apart from the round trip into Ballarat for me, which ends up being half a day, twice....

    cheers,
    Bob

  9. #2059
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Melbourne Victoria
    Posts
    11,929

    Icon10 Decisions Decisions but any excuse..

    Quote Originally Posted by bob View Post
    G'day,



    sure does, but it didn't do anything after a few minutes with the heat gun. Suggests to me that the whole bulk of the thing has to be over a certain temperature before it's happy, maybe the same with instant freeze cans.

    To find the fault will probably cost more that the saw is worth. Apart from the round trip into Ballarat for me, which ends up being half a day, twice....

    cheers,
    Bob
    Bob I can see you are geared up for a necessity replacement, urgency story for your good Lady to "understand" the NEED to get a new saw, of course you could wait till Aldi have a sale of the 20 volt battery run skins, nice and convenient to use away from a mains power point, but then of course you start the accumulation of chargers, batteries etc./ etc. but they do have a 5 year warranty and so far no questions on return in that period (Ps I could loan you some batteries, chargers and the skins as they seem to accumulate.

    Ken

  10. #2060
    bob
    bob is offline
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Skipton
    Posts
    2,412

    Default

    G'day Ken,

    yep, just waiting for the next Bosch promotion for probably one of these...
    https://www.totaltools.com.au/power-...de-8-mitre-saw
    good value for 12x2 cutting capacity, adjustable speed and six years warranty.
    Or, this new idea that does away with the sliding action....
    https://www.totaltools.com.au/power-...-folding-stand
    lovely smooth action but a fair old price premium ! and I don't need the extra grunt.

    cheers,
    Bob
    Kenfuego likes this.

  11. #2061
    Too many posts! JohnW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Perth, WA, Australia
    Posts
    10,891

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bob View Post
    Apart from the round trip into Ballarat for me, which ends up being half a day, twice.... cheers, Bob
    Now I know which Skipton it is.... That Bosch mitre saw is sooo tempting.
    JohnW

    Renault 4CV 1951
    Renault R8 1965
    Renault Scenic 2005 (wife's)
    Renault Scenic 2007 (mine)
    Renault Scenic 2006 (daughter's)
    CitroŽn CX Pallas 1980

    National Co-ordinator, Renault 4CV Register of Australia

  12. #2062
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warrnambool
    Posts
    2,372

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bob View Post
    I don't need the extra grunt.
    Oxymoron of the year. Whoever heard of a bloke not needing a gruntier power tool. It would be like me saying I don't need a bigger tractor.

    Roger

  13. #2063
    bob
    bob is offline
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Skipton
    Posts
    2,412

    Default

    G'day,

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Wilkinson View Post
    Oxymoron of the year. Whoever heard of a bloke not needing a gruntier power tool. It would be like me saying I don't need a bigger tractor.

    Roger
    But, there is already a 12" Bosch plain mitre [no sliders] in the shed, and lives there as it's not particularly portable. It's mate is an elderly Makita plain drop saw which is mainly used for firewood.....

    Grunt is pretty much satisfied....

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnW View Post
    Now I know which Skipton it is.... That Bosch mitre saw is sooo tempting.
    and so is this unit, currently on promotion....
    https://www.totaltools.com.au/82228-..._content=82228
    I checked it out recently, really smooth operation, and 341x104 mm cutting capacity. But, you pay for the grunt, the little devil is 32kg, not really handy for taking inside for the flatpack kitchen.... The 8" unit delivers enough punch for these sort of jobs and is nicely portable at only 19kg, also offers variable speed, tool free blade change, 312x70mm....

    Who ever heard of just one tractor....

    cheers,
    Bob
    Kenfuego likes this.

  14. #2064
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    6,442

    Default

    Bob, I reckon it's the soft start module in that Makita. As soon as they start getting fancy.....


    2003 PEUGEOT 206 GTi

  15. #2065
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warrnambool
    Posts
    2,372

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bob View Post
    Who ever heard of just one tractor....
    Certainly not me. Nine at last count. Horsepower ranges from 100 to 14. Ages range from 20 to 70 years.

    I'm always looking for more. The weirder the better. Losing bidder on a Renault 651 (mid-80s, 70 hp, 4wd, loader, cabin) a couple of months ago.

    Roger
    Kenfuego and bob like this.

  16. #2066
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    8,862

    Default

    Would one of these suit? (Family team driving, they usually bought Internationals) tractor.jpg

  17. #2067
    bob
    bob is offline
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Skipton
    Posts
    2,412

    Default

    G'day,

    Quote Originally Posted by Stuey View Post
    Bob, I reckon it's the soft start module in that Makita. As soon as they start getting fancy.....
    my thoughts also, I mentioned it to the repair guy who said "I'm looking at the circuit diagram and can't see one".

    He indicated that it was full of clips instead of screws, welds and soldered joints. If a soft start was present you'd reckon that the part would be obvious - and easy to swap out.... But, how clever are these "technicians"....

    cheers,
    Bob

    hmmm, not very clever it seems, there's a soft start unit in the bloody parts list....
    https://www.toolspareparts.com.au/ma...are-parts.html
    Last edited by bob; 9th October 2019 at 08:24 AM. Reason: postscript...

  18. #2068
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Ballarat,Vic,Aust.
    Posts
    16,466

    Default

    Hmm.... I wonder how we change tractor tires.... I was greeted with a nice fine spray of water from one of the huge age cracks in on of the rear tires today. I have no idea how to handle tractor tires. If it has a tube in it I'll see if I can break the bead and get the tube out for patching.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/citro%EBn-forum/90325-best-project-car-you-have-ever-seen.html
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  19. #2069
    1000+ Posts FIVEDOOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Brisbane Qld
    Posts
    20,459

    Default

    The limit of my knowledge on split rims is that I know of one person who was killed and another who was seriously injured by split rims. One was a tractor tyre/rim, the other a racing tyre/rim. Both worked at tyre shops.
    Any day I wake up and don't have to go to work, is a good day
    Every day is a good day

  20. #2070
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warrnambool
    Posts
    2,372

    Default

    The 28 inch rear rims on Shane's tractor are not split. I have a Mumme bead breaker for that sort of work.

    https://www.mummetools.com/catalogue...g-slide-hammer

    The tube is bigger and heavier than you think!

    Last time I needed to replace a rear tyre on my 444 (basically the same tractor as Shane's) I could not remove the wheel nuts. I ended up having my tyre man come out and do the job with the wheel still on the tractor. He managed to find me a second hand tyre that matched the existing sound one.

    I have taken the water out of most of my tractor tyres. I no longer do tillage and don't need the traction.

    Roger
    FIVEDOOR likes this.

  21. #2071
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    6,442

    Default

    I've changed a few car tyres with one of those slide hammer bead breakers and a rubber mallet, but not tractor tyres!


    2003 PEUGEOT 206 GTi

  22. #2072
    1000+ Posts Rod Hagen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    1,640

    Default

    Nothing wrong with proper split rims, Fivedoor! I once had to change 17 tyres in one day on a Landcruiser 4x4 out in the bush of the NT between Utopia and Murray Downs back in the 70s. If it hadn't had split rims I reckon I'd have died then and there! Something tells me that 2invertedVs tractor rims aren't split, though! For what it is worth, DoubleChevron, you can always add a tube to a tubeless tyre if it is only mildly stuffed (not cheap, those tractor tyres, either - A cousin of mine once bought a second hand tractor because it was cheaper than replacing a tyre!)! Spinifex (as I found in the NT) works a treat when all else fails, too, but only for a couple of hundred Ks max.

    Cheers

    Rod
    Rod's Home Page

    Rod's car page

    Peugeot 4008 2016Peugeot 407 SV HDi estate 2008, Peugeot 407 SV Hdi Sedan 2006, (deadish), - Previously 403s, 404, 504, 505 sLI Wagons, 406 ST 1997, 307 XSE, 306 XSi, Renault 12, Citroen DSpecial

  23. #2073
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Melbourne / Caulfield
    Posts
    19,177

    Default

    you can always add a tube to a tubeless tyre
    Reading around and after speaking to tyre fitters and sellers this is not recommended.

    The inside of tubeless tyres are rougher and tend to abrade the tube. Tubeless tyres with tubes also tend to run hotter than manufacturer intended.

    I've never choose to fit a tube to a tubeless tyre as permanent solution.

  24. #2074
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warrnambool
    Posts
    2,372

    Default

    Shane's tractor has a tube type tyre.

    Roger

  25. #2075
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Ballarat,Vic,Aust.
    Posts
    16,466

    Default

    Thanks all... I jacked it up this morning and spun the wheel so the puncture was to the bottom and the water could come out. One look at the aged tires has convinced me there is no way I'm breaking those beads without the right tools ( maybe if it was a new soft tire .... I'm guessing this one is 30+ years old though).


    Roger as always was right .... those nuts. "tight" is right, I figured I'd knock the wheel off and take it upto the local tire place and see what they suggested (I'm guessing a new tire is over $1000, though cheap chinese are now available on ebay for about $550). That is probably bad economy given my experience with chinese rubber (ie: it'll be perished and dead in 2years rather than 40years). Anyway, I've never seen my rattle gun work so hard .... a solid 30 seconds on a couple of those nuts. I'd done 2/3rds of the nuts an the rattle gun was slowing down ... and letting the smoke escape. So I let it cool down for 15minutes before loosening the rest (its a 3/4" hitachi impact wrench ... I purchased used. it brushes stink whenever I use it ... and it's probably has a thousands of hours on it ... but it still works its magic). I have found if you use extension bars or reduction sockets ( ie: 3/4 -> 1/2" adapter) ... You "loose" a huge amount of the "shock" and nuts will not loosen. To get around this I push on the back of the rattle gun to take up any slop in the adapters/extensions (well as much of the slop as I can).

    Say Roger, I have that tire sitting there with all the nuts still on a few turns. It feels really heavy... I'm not really keen on pulling it off and having it crush me. Is there a simple way to verify all the water is out the tires specs online say the tire itself is 80kg .... I'm betting the wheel is another 80kg ... SO if that sucker still has water in it ... .it's way outside of what I can safely handle. I guess I just remove the nuts and kick it off from behind, that way it can fall onto the ground where I can safely try to lift it too see how heavy it it.

    BTW: Roger doesn't need a bead breaker. I looked on youtube. Bead breaking is dead simple when you have machinery onsite. A FEL, backhoe, any sort of trayback crane.... Anything that can "push" with hydraulic power. You can jack the wheel up. "nudge" it with bucket/crane and pop the outer bead. Then use a bucket tooth/spoon and "pull" the tire and break the inner bead.

    I can see Roger doing this:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B1gusC2TBqM

    fast forward to 2:13.

    seeya
    Shane L.
    Last edited by DoubleChevron; 13th October 2019 at 04:45 PM.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

Page 83 of 84 First ... 3373798081828384 Last

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 3 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 3 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •