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  1. #1901
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    Angle grinder? Bah. A few years ago I was told of a mob who backed up a van to places well away from a quick police response and cut a hole in the house with a chainsaw. Who notes chainsaw noise once out of the suburbs?

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  2. #1902
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    Quote Originally Posted by seasink View Post
    This graphic shows how few tool manufacturers there now are.
    Attachment 113673
    And keep in mind that this chart is not up to date. E.g, it doesn't show that Sidchrome was taken over by Stanley Black and Decker in 2010. What other take overs have occurred since then?

  3. #1903
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    Default Made in PRC...

    G'day Roger,

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Wilkinson View Post
    I have got over the "Made in PRC" label on the Milwaukee gear. The quality and quality control is fine. I have some European-made corded Milwaukee power tools and I would not call the Chinese cordless tools second-rate in comparison. And this from a tool snob who prefers not to stoop any lower than Australian-made Sidchrome in hand tools.

    Bob, you are welcome to try before you buy.

    Roger
    thanks Roger, put them with the old catalogues, I'll check them out.... You passing through here sometime ? or maybe we meet up for lunch at Mortlake ?

    On PRC, I've been told that they produce to specs, very efficiently, if you bugger up the specs that's your worry.

    I have a baby Senco nail gun that was made in the same PRC factory as an elcheapo home brand, and looks the same as well. However, the internal parts list is not shared.... They have the know how to do the job properly, no worries, but the guys on the assembly line are not fitters. There is the old story of 'South Bend', when it went oriental, the lathes produced were lovely, just like the old ones even with nice brass oilers over all the bearings - but no feed hole, it wasn't on the drawing....

    May be just a yarn, but it serves the point....

    cheers,
    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    They are all made in a 3rd world country now. The battery tools are probably the best they have ever been (lawn mowers, brush cutter and chainsaws could be included in the statement ).
    seeya
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    No, they are not. None of them are made here
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  5. #1905
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    Quote Originally Posted by seasink View Post
    Angle grinder? Bah. A few years ago I was told of a mob who backed up a van to places well away from a quick police response and cut a hole in the house with a chainsaw. Who notes chainsaw noise once out of the suburbs?
    They aren't that noisy. They just steal a nice big battery powered chainsaw before heading out If your lucky there will be no safety switches ............................. and they chop throgh a power cable

    My house is even easier. Its hilarious all these window locks, safety screens, etc... that people fit to feel safe .................................................. ......... when they have a tile roof
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    My house is even easier. Its hilarious all these window locks, safety screens, etc... that people fit to feel safe .................................................. ......... when they have a tile roof
    Yes, but they do the job with the class of thief about, you know the ones that steal the car and park it 400 m down the road, because they can't work the manual gearbox, or the one who does a ram raid and reverses into pile of builders sand leaving impression of the number plate, or the armed hold up merhant who drops bank card receipt in the get away vehicle and the police are at home waiting for him before he gets home in the neighbouring town.
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    Home security is about making your house less attractive than the next guy, time wise. They'll get into any house if they want.

    Wife went out for half hour a few years ago and came home to lever marks on the sliding doors and crumbled brickwork, but they didn't get in because we always put thick wooden dowels in the doors and windows (among other measures) when we go out. They tried two sliders and a window and gave up because it was no longer going to be a quick in and out job while the missus was doing the school run. Our roof tiles have storm clips holding them down as we're near the beach; not impregnable, but again time and noise issues.


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  8. #1908
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuey View Post
    Home security is about making your house less attractive than the next guy, time wise. They'll get into any house if they want.

    Wife went out for half hour a few years ago and came home to lever marks on the sliding doors and crumbled brickwork, but they didn't get in because we always put thick wooden dowels in the doors and windows (among other measures) when we go out. They tried two sliders and a window and gave up because it was no longer going to be a quick in and out job while the missus was doing the school run. Our roof tiles have storm clips holding them down as we're near the beach; not impregnable, but again time and noise issues.
    often the screen beside the sliding door isn't screwed down. You can just drag that down the tracks and walk in (leaving the door locked). I imagine this woudl be the case with 99.995% of sliding door
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    I was surprised how cheap it was to install a CCTV system. Four cameras (each programmable) and 3TB hard drive cost us about $365. Now get to see what stray cats visit at night! No worries with parcels being left on patio. We also use it to monitor our bird (eg on hot days) while we are out (via our phones).

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    Yep Shane true about that other side of the door. Mine had a single self tapper holding them, sufficient but only just. And on some sliding door latches, the hook latch part is held only by a small M6 screw in the middle of the latch lever by clamping force only which eventually loosens in use, so when levered this latch just pulls loos enough to flick it open.


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    Back to tools, I was given one of these the other day for nowt. The guy who bought it said it wasn't what he wanted and he's got loads of cash. It came with a set of ten different belts and works quite well. Good for building dolls houses...or hand sharpening small drills...

    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/1X-Multi...frcectupt=true


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  12. #1912
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    Here is a topic we probably haven't covered yet .... Does anyone know of an easy way to compact ground for driveway pavers . I'm considering buying 78 square meters of 80mm driveway pavers (for sale locally). Given they will be driven on, the foundations under them will certainly need to be heavily compacted. I've been looking around and compactors are very expensive (given it would only be used for one job.... Even if it did take me 6months to finish the job ).

    Rental wouldn't really happen as they would mean I would have to try and get all the earthworks done in one day rather than over weeks/months (which would be difficult to say the least ).

    Does anyone have any smart ideas

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    You can lay them in stages on on a shallow sand bed, provided the foundation is levelled and compacted. That could be done all at once in advance, either by a vibrating roller (expensive hire) or a hired vibrating plate compactor (much slower and harder on you). Profile the foundation to drain properly.

    Put some mortar at the edges or cars will knock the pavers out.

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    An easy way ? Low-tech but well-proven ? Try looking at how they do it in second-world countries like Thailand or Vietnam. Google and Youtube are your friend.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    Here is a topic we probably haven't covered yet .... Does anyone know of an easy way to compact ground for driveway pavers . I'm considering buying 78 square meters of 80mm driveway pavers (for sale locally). Given they will be driven on, the foundations under them will certainly need to be heavily compacted. I've been looking around and compactors are very expensive (given it would only be used for one job.... Even if it did take me 6months to finish the job ).

    Rental wouldn't really happen as they would mean I would have to try and get all the earthworks done in one day rather than over weeks/months (which would be difficult to say the least ).

    Does anyone have any smart ideas

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    When I did my driveway, I used my daily driver of the time, a piece of 4x2 for a screed and string lines to get levels right.

    I think I may of borrowed the next door neighbours concrete roller to do the edges.

    This was done some 18 years ago and I have had no sinking of the pavers.

    From memory I did it over a month or so.

    Just my worth
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    The degree of compaction depends on the foundation. You wouldn't get away with just screeding or driving over at my place where it's clay. It's important to remove the topsoil, as this can never be satisfactorily compacted.

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    Quote Originally Posted by seasink View Post
    The degree of compaction depends on the foundation. You wouldn't get away with just screeding or driving over at my place where it's clay. It's important to remove the topsoil, as this can never be satisfactorily compacted.
    The amount of compaction need also depends on what you intend to drive over the top of the finished surface.

    Also using water aids compaction as does time.
    Regards Col

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  18. #1918
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    For a similar "small" job, I bought a new compactor from Able Sales in Perth (current price $495 - they are in Melbourne - Coolaroo). I also needed it for several days spaced apart. Cost of cheap Chinese compactor same as 2-3 days rental IIRC. Can get smaller, lighter, cheaper ones, but this is a reasonably pro size and weight. Did the job and has been borrowed many times since by neighbour and nephews. No regrets on this one. Needs 2 people to lift it comfortably. It needs to be revved until your teeth are vibrating to be working properly .

    80mm pavers are heavy duty and wont shift much if just driving light vehicles on them. Seems the thicker they are, the less they move, maybe they spread the load more evenly.

    Over here we have grey sand everywhere. For heavy duty driveway, we remove about 150mm of topsoil, put in at least 100mm limestone roadbase, compact just with the bobcat, top with 75mm yellow sand and final compact with compactor.

    I cant remember actual cost, but relatively inexpensive to get bobcat contractor with tip truck to do the lot (except the final compacting), including delivering the roadbase and yellow sand, and he does it in incredibly quick time, probably a few hours for your size job.

    Cheers.
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  19. #1919
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    Thanks guys,

    I did a fair bit of paving around the house last year. I just used crusher dust. I have a roller here that is so heavy I can barely move it ... I found walking on the dust afterwards left footprints ................. ie: me walking on it in boots compacted it better than rollers did. So I just walked it in circles over and over until I'd built it up enough.





    I found I couldn't dig down as its just clay and granite. One big area even turned to a big trampoline that I ended up laying the pavers down onto. So I really don't want anything digging and and breaking through the "crust".



    I want to pave from that new doorway across to the carport. It is downhill, so I'll probably need to run a pipe under it to allow water past. If I dig down rather than putting blue metal dust on top and paving above the level of the existing ground, I'll loose any existing compression of the area. Digging down will expose the clay/granite crap below .................... and we are heading into winter. Once its soaked with water you could dig down meters and still not find a solid base ( On the other side of the coin, in summer you would need a jack hammer ... or dynamite to dig the clay).

    I'll probably need to buy a cheap vibrating plate compactor given the feedback above .

    seeya,
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    G'day Shane,

    we got normal gravel from the local supplier, which is a good mix of sizes and lots of fines in it. Laid weed mat and spread the gravel out about an inch or so thick, rolled with a water filled roller about 3' wide. This has been great for foot traffic and I'd reckon would be a good base to work from for your pavers - particularly if you drive over it a few times...

    The gravel has gone really solid.

    We put crushed quartz in the driveways, it just looks pretty. Compacts reasonably well where it's driven on but the rest of it is like walking on a mattress ! It rolls under your feet like little marbles - no sharp edges to lock into each other.

    cheers,
    Bob

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    I bought the same Able compactor about 10 years ago for $550 (delivered) and sold it a year or so later for $420. So it cost me about the same as a day’s hire. Had the same experience as Fordman – basic in quality but did quite a good job for its size.
    Our driveway pavers were initially laid (40 yrs ago) over an area containing fill in parts, with a layer of roadbase over the top. Because of the fill, I regret not having it more heavily compacted before laying pavers, as they subsided in a couple of spots over time. A truck, loaded with crushed glass, caused them to sink slightly in one area

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    For roadbase the grading is important. If the fines don't fill the spaces between coarse aggregate you'll never compact it properly. A little dampness helps.

    You can get roadbase to road making spec in most places. There will be a supplier to the trade. Around here it's likely to be made from crushed concrete. The crushers are located at the tips for building waste.

    Ballarat has different stone, but in Sydney the endless tunneling and excavating is producing a wonderful sub-base - crushed sandstone. I have seen it removed from sites for free by paving contractors.

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    G'day,

    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    ........

    I'll probably need to buy a cheap vibrating plate compactor given the feedback above .

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    sounds like a good move anyway, you're bound to get extra use out of it. Price looks good, compared to hiring it will make economic (and convenience) sense after you've used it two or three times.

    But, look after the old body - if I use the Aldi kanga-hammer for a couple of hours my elbows/shoulder/neck remind me about the job for the next couple of weeks !!

    As to the cut-off drain, I've one to do here that's been put off for years - now I have the ideal tool for it, held stationary, that little tiller digs up a little trench easy as....

    cheers,
    Bob

  24. #1924
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob View Post
    G'day,



    sounds like a good move anyway, you're bound to get extra use out of it. Price looks good, compared to hiring it will make economic (and convenience) sense after you've used it two or three times.

    But, look after the old body - if I use the Aldi kanga-hammer for a couple of hours my elbows/shoulder/neck remind me about the job for the next couple of weeks !!

    As to the cut-off drain, I've one to do here that's been put off for years - now I have the ideal tool for it, held stationary, that little tiller digs up a little trench easy as....

    cheers,
    Bob
    Thanks All,

    I'm not worried to much about digging the drains. I have a ripper here that will break up the ground, no matter how hard it is. This is what I am trying to avoid at all costs though. When you break any existing compaction onto the clay, it turns instantly to a big huge big clay pit ..... When I was doing the paving around the house, I found if I dug down into the clay and filled it with dust/bluemetal. The whole area would then be like a trampoline. ie: avoid digging down and breaking through whatever "crust" has formed at all costs.



    Here is a photo from last spring. That wooden carport has since ... er... "moved itself" to somewhere else in the yard and that leanto on the side of the shed .... er... That was always there

    that old wooden carport was there for probably the last 30years. So now that I think about it. I want to put a drain in ... and build "UP" to pave. That area should be a compacted base from being driven on for 30years. So I wil put down 50->150mm of bluemetal dust (using he dust to level the area enough for paving) and lay straight ontop. I will just need to make sure the bluemetal dust is compacted enough... ie: back to buying a compactor.

    Then run blue metal gravel to blend the drive into the higher paved area (if that makes sense).

    This sounds like a HUGE amount of work
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    I would have thought that in your general area, there should be lots of heavy road type rollers penned up in yards of councils, sports ground areas. Owners that could be approached and free use gained or with a token donation, borrowed for use behind that tractor you have sitting there.

    Amazing what can be achieved by simply asking around, you could even luck into a contractor that would do the job for very little cost and save you days and months of preparation and finishing.

    With your talents you might even be able to volunteer grass cutting or similar in exchange, where there is goodwill and a willingness to help, anything can be accomplished with very little in the way of real money exchange.


    The quicker you get the job finished and to the satisfaction of your good lady, the better for all IMHO!


    ken

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