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Thread: Tool Talk

  1. #1326
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    Thanks Shane! No its a 12" bar. Yeah, it shouldn't be too worn; Dad got it new and only used it a bit, then gave it to aforementioned numpty who handed it back in its current state after giving it a hiding. It came back with the bar and chain covered in sand and we guessed he'd been cutting roots half buried. One of those where you remember a year later that you didn't get a tool back and have to ask for it.

    It's never even had a sparkplug change. I inherited it a while back and haven't had time to get it going.

    How do you tell if the bar is OK, not worn out? Or do they last ages?

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    Last edited by Stuey; 7th June 2017 at 10:39 PM.
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  2. #1327
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
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    Chain bars do last ages but not forever.

    Trying to cut absasive stuff like sand kills chain bars. After a while they get a burr on the edge of the outer surface where the chain runs. You can remove this with a file. Once the surface has worn down so the drive lugs on the chain bottom out the bar is worn out. Another problem is the groove the chain runs in can spread. You can try to close it up with a vice but this might not be successful. If the chain flops sideways more than just slightly the bar is worn out. Also, if there is a sprocket in the tip, the sprocket or its bearing can wear out. I suppose a welded bar could delaminate.

    Roger
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  3. #1328
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    Thanks Roger, good info there.
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  4. #1329
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    Default Metal spinning tools

    They say it's better to own tools you don't need than to need tools you don't own.

    These tools were made from a piece of stick, some skate board bearings and a Renault r10 steering column, they feel lovely in the hand.

    Now I just need to find a use for them..

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tool Talk-img_5263.jpg   Tool Talk-img_5265.jpg   Tool Talk-img_5270.jpg  

  5. #1330
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    They definitely look like they should have a purpose. What exactly are they?

  6. #1331
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    Spinning your own hubcaps?
    Any day I wake up and don't have to go to work, is a good day
    Every day is a good day

  7. #1332
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    Yes correct, metal spinning is suitable for making things like hubcaps, teapots or any other round sheet metal item. The best I could suggest is have a look on YouTube for 'metal spinning', many examples exist therein.

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    Ah yes. I saw some chaps doing that on a visit to Sovereign Hill in Ballarat, some years back. Brilliant place. There were several workshops with real steam engines, with huge drive belts all over the place, driving machinery.

    Pardon me if this is a silly question, but do you do metal spinning, or were these items more a project for the hell of it?

    Thanks, John

  9. #1334
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    John, yes I've played at metal spinning enough to know that you do need good equipment to produce desirable results. The tools above will be a good start to a collection I intend to amass. Projects will follow capability IMHO.

  10. #1335
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    Default Decking board straightening tool

    My prototype is working a treat using a car jack.
    I thought about using the Bunnings fastening screw system but decided to go with TigerClaw instead because they are SS.
    It's also obvious why dead straight synthetic decking boards are preferred by installers.
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  11. #1336
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    Looking for a paint booth?

    - should be big enough for all your paint jobs

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  12. #1337
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    Guys, I need an impact driver but only for very occasional use so don't want to spend too much. I need it for my daughter's Astra crankshaft bolt as it's due a timing belt.

    I have the manual type using a hammer, but am looking at an electric one. I know air is better, but then I'd have to buy a compressor and my shed is already chock a block with gear. Are there any electric ones that are both useful and not really expensive? Or would these be little better than a hammer type?
    1991 PEUGEOT 405 Mi16

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  13. #1338
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuey View Post
    Guys, I need an impact driver but only for very occasional use so don't want to spend too much. I need it for my daughter's Astra crankshaft bolt as it's due a timing belt.

    I have the manual type using a hammer, but am looking at an electric one. I know air is better, but then I'd have to buy a compressor and my shed is already chock a block with gear. Are there any electric ones that are both useful and not really expensive? Or would these be little better than a hammer type?
    I purchased a heavily battered dinky hitachi electric rattle gun on ebay .... it is nothing short of brilliant. You need a reducer to go down from 3/4 to 1/2" to fit most of my sockets.

    seeya
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  14. #1339
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    Excellent, that might be the way to go.
    1991 PEUGEOT 405 Mi16

    2003 PEUGEOT 206 GTi

  15. #1340
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Oh, they aren't super cheap even 2nd hand.

    here's a makita version:

    MAKITA 3/4" IMPACT WRENCH ELECTRIC 6906 END OF PROJECT SALE SAVE$ RRP $1000 | eBay

    here the hitachi version I have

    Hitachi WH 22 3/4" 19mm Impact Wrench Rattle Gun | eBay



    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
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    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  16. #1341
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    Yeah, I'd seen those. I won't spend that much.

    I'd considered using the manual whack-o-driver to see if it worked but don't like the idea of impacting the crank longitudinally against its thrust bearings. The electric ones obviously only impact in rotation.
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  17. #1342
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    I have one of those 3/4" drive Hitachis and it is excellent. I also have a 1/2" drive Milwaukee and it's pretty good too. Both corded and bought second hand quite reasonably. I have a Milwaukee 1/2" drive 18 volt cordless as well and it is gruntier than the corded one! The cordless ones do come in different gruntinesses and I would recommend the gruntiest one but they are expensive.

    I do have a 1/2" drive Bosch 18 volt cordless one that hasn't had a lot of use. I replaced it with the Milwaukee one because it wasn't quite grunty enough. If it's of any interest and you can wait until August we might be able to do a deal. Batteries, charger, angle grinder and 1/4" hex drive impact driver also available.

    Roger

  18. #1343
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    Can you get a slogging ring spanner onto the crank nut? That way you can belt the thing without worry.

  19. #1344
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    Hi Roger; I'm interested depending on the price of course. What level of grunties does it have?

    Seasink, probably although I haven't gotten in there yet. The problem is that it's a torx bolt, E18 (I think that size) and is recessed quite deeply into the pulley, plus it's quite tight being a torque to yield bolt along with using thread lock fluid. The other problem is that they're notorious for difficulties locking the flywheel, but i'm probably going to buy the proper crank locking tool after more research today so that should alleviate this issue.

    Fortunately it's a ten year or 150,000km belt service interval!
    1991 PEUGEOT 405 Mi16

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  20. #1345
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    Hi Roger; I'll pass on your offer. I found out my wife's cousin has a driver I can borrow any time. This guy removes his Landcruiser engine just because he's bored so has all sorts of tools and gizmos. Thanks anyway.
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  21. #1346
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    No worries Stuey. Any tool you don't have to pay for is a good tool!

    Roger

  22. #1347
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    I've used a teng tools impact wrench.
    Great for tight spots against chassis rails
    You hit it with a hammer and use impact sockets as usual
    Works just as good if you are good

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using aussiefrogs mobile app

  23. #1348
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    Hagglund, I have three of those inherited from my Dad, if you mean the ones that are a cylinder of solid metal with a 1/2" drive sticking out the end that can be set to turn either way by turning the drive end. Hold in one hand and whack the end with a socket on the other end driving the nut. Mine have screwdriver bits as well, like most I've seen. All good quality, but can't remember the brands. As I wrote above, though, I was concerned about whacking the crank longitudunally in case it damages something.
    1991 PEUGEOT 405 Mi16

    2003 PEUGEOT 206 GTi

  24. #1349
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    How about a leather or rubber disc or washer between the socket and nut....ah but it's a torks!! So a rubber or leather plug at the bottom of the Torks bit to absorb longtitudinal shock?

  25. #1350
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    Currently my favorite tool is a number 400 crochet needle. Just the thing for getting those pesky windscreen rubbers over the plastic wiper cowl on my 205....
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