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  1. #51
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    I wonder if he posts rope out in the mail
    I was actually thinking of you when I was in the shop, as some of the big mooring ropes (50mm+)would be more than adequate for anything you might care to tie them to.
    Jo

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  2. #52
    bob
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    G'day Jo,

    Quote Originally Posted by jo proffi View Post
    ...............The best bit is that by getting my stuff from this guy, he will terminate the ropes 'old school' way, which I absolutely love.......$30......
    I'm surprised mate, it only takes a few minutes to do those loops at the ends - I usually finish mine with one end looped and the other plain. Hard part is getting it started, like some other things early in the morning

    Notice he has an abrupt ending to the looped one, nicer when the free ends are cut to different lengths so there is a tapered ending.

    Should be able to dig out some directions for if you want to learn ?

    cheers,
    Bob

  3. #53
    1000+ Posts Wildebeest's Avatar
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    Default Tools

    Simon,
    Thanks for putting up the pictures of the Craftsman spanners.
    Far better than my word picture in post 31.

    Wildebeest
    Last edited by Wildebeest; 26th December 2010 at 01:03 PM. Reason: stuff

  4. #54
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    This could be really handy for people into megasquirt systems !!!!

    http://cgi.ebay.com.au/Dyno-/2607120...item3cb3a67f90
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  5. #55
    1000+ Posts Wildebeest's Avatar
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    Couldn't help myself and at the urging of Mrs 'beest I bought a set of $36 Craftsman spanners from Bunnos. See Simon's post*44.
    As I was going through the check-out a know-all voice behind me said. "Oh they'll be useless they will just snap off".
    "That's interesting says I, considering they have only just appeared on the market."

    The design is not new of course, apart from the pall in the jaws they look identical to the open end spanners that were supplied with early Peugeots.

    Simon, I think my spanners will also be purely for the novelty.
    Last edited by Wildebeest; 31st December 2010 at 06:12 PM. Reason: stuff

  6. #56
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildebeest View Post
    Couldn't help myself and at the urging of Mrs 'beest I bought a set of $36 Craftsman spanners from Bunnos. See Simon's post*44.
    As I was going through the check-out a know-all voice behind me said. "Oh they'll be useless they will just snap off".
    "That's interesting says I, considering they have only just appeared on the market."

    The design is not new of course, apart from the pall in the jaws they look identical to the open end spanners that were supplied with early Peugeots.

    Simon, I think my spanners will also be purely for the novelty.
    I did a similar thing for 3/4 drive air ratchet, in the "surplus bin" for $12 and it looks quite good quality.

    Do you think normal 3/4 drive Kinchrome sockets would be OK to use for light duty use?
    Mutual Respect is Contagious


  7. #57
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by robmac View Post
    I did a similar thing for 3/4 drive air ratchet, in the "surplus bin" for $12 and it looks quite good quality.

    Do you think normal 3/4 drive Kinchrome sockets would be OK to use for light duty use?
    Do you mean 3/8????
    3/4 would be overkill for light duty.

    Jo

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by jo proffi View Post
    Do you mean 3/8????
    3/4 would be overkill for light duty.

    Jo
    Yes, quite correct Jo, must have vagued out. It is 3/8 SD

    cheers
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  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by robmac View Post
    Yes, quite correct Jo, must have vagued out. It is 3/8 SD

    cheers

    It did make me think, gee am I flooging the crap out of my 3/8 set if I should be using a thumper tool.

    Jo

  10. #60
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Time for a tool review. I don't like battery operated tools... to slow, batteries that die... not enough grunt.... Anyway my father found a Makita cordless drill on special after he'd finished building his house ... so grabbed it (after suffering through a couple of dick smith cordless drills while building the house).

    When the roof fell in down here ( ) he bought it down to ram the screws in with .... I wasn't impressed really, to heavy and clumsy in comparison to the ancient WOLF tech gun (at least there is no cord in your way).

    Well the last week or so I've been busy .... I'm NEVER returning this drill unless I have too.... It's the best thing I've used in years.

    First I finally got around the throwing up the cubbyhouse for the kids....Rather than run extension leads all over the paddock I grabbed this drill out........ To screw the cross bracing on .... HUGE wood screws with 13mm heads... I put my 3/8th socket set extension bar in there and 13mm socket.... and rammed the screws home without even drilling pilot holes.... The damn thing has so much power I had to hold the drill with a second hand down on the battery to stop it tearing out of my hands ... This is bloody incredible ... How can a piddly little 12volt drill have so much grunt.



    yes I know he door needs a need stick of wood in it ..... Hmmm.... so I moved onto the storage shed that I've been trying to get to for 3months.... Flick the drill onto it's highest gear to drill the holes.... I don't have a drill with a chuck that holds the drill bits as tight as this keyless chuck, no matter how hard I tighten the chuck... To ram new screw in ... choose the highest speed and flick it over to screw .... It'll cut a hole through the metal and the clutch will throw the drive out as soon as the screw hits home in the timber behind.



    I always thought multiple batteries were a dumb idea "they'll all die at the same time as there the same age".... this may well be true, however with the charger i couldn't flatten the existing battery no matter how fast I tried to screw sheets down without the other battery being fully charged in the mean time. I'm hoping to finish the shed this weekend before my father finds out I'm wearing his drill out and attempts to claim ownership back from me



    Look at that, all this front a piddly little 12volt cordless tool. I think my father got this at half price as they were discontinuing the 12volt model. If this is 12volts... I can only imagine what the 18volt version are like

    seeya,
    Shane L.
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    '78 GS1220 pallas
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    Yay ... No Slugomatics


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  11. #61
    bob
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    G'day Shane,

    maybe cos it's a USA one......

    We all got cheesed off with battery stuff, especially with the 9v makitas that cost you heaps and the batteries were more than a new drill - that's why I got the plug-in makita screwdriver, much the same price at the time but ten times the machine.

    Picked up a dynalink 18v a while back at a price too good to refuse though, can't help myself sometimes. But this little sucker does a inch and a quarter holesaw job though 32mm MDF without even slowing down - they're getting better, and that's a chinese one ....

    cheers,
    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by robmac View Post
    I did a similar thing for 3/4 drive air ratchet, in the "surplus bin" for $12 and it looks quite good quality.

    Do you think normal 3/4 drive Kinchrome sockets would be OK to use for light duty use?
    Kinchrome sockets are fine for llight duty use.
    The intended use of the air ratchet is for the removal of the fastener, after it has been loosened, unless you know the torque of the fastener to be low initially.

    I am assuming you are using the " standard " chromed 12 point socket or bihexagonal as I am see them refered to in tool cattle dogs these days.
    Single hex sockets are my prefered weapon these days.

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackafrica View Post
    Kinchrome sockets are fine for llight duty use.
    The intended use of the air ratchet is for the removal of the fastener, after it has been loosened, unless you know the torque of the fastener to be low initially.

    I am assuming you are using the " standard " chromed 12 point socket or bihexagonal as I am see them refered to in tool cattle dogs these days.
    Single hex sockets are my prefered weapon these days.
    I might just buy some cheap hex sockets to use with the air ratchet
    The intended use is to speed up disassembly of old engines prior to hot bathing.

    It's amazing how much faster it is using air tools.

    As you have probably gathered it 3/8 drive not 3/4 as posted
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    Default Thread Chasers - old style

    Does anyone have a source for metric thread chasers, the old style type ?
    By that I mean the hand held, separate internal and external thread type with a handle, or in the case of external thread sometimes a square shank for mounting in a lathe ?

    There were some made by Eclipse many years ago and I've managed to strike a few Imperial and Whitwirth threaded varieties, but metric is not so simple.

    Their intended use is for metal and precision is required.

    I'll try and dig up an image to illustrate the type I am seeking.



    Thanks.
    Last edited by richo; 8th January 2011 at 07:37 PM.

  15. #65
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by robmac View Post
    I might just buy some cheap hex sockets to use with the air ratchet
    The intended use is to speed up disassembly of old engines prior to hot bathing.

    It's amazing how much faster it is using air tools.

    As you have probably gathered it 3/8 drive not 3/4 as posted
    I've found the air hose gets in the way to much. Having said that for something like pulling the nose off a GS they are brilliant. The one I have works as a "standard" ratchet... So you do the initial few ratchets yourself to loosen the fastener, then the air driven bit will unscrew the remainder of the fastener. Mines a 1/2" air ratchet. It's lived in the toolbox for years, it's simply to big and unwieldy to be bothered with. My grandfather (who was a mechanic for decades) said the 3/8ths are the best. Get one that's nice an physically small.

    If you check your socket set, you'll find the 1/4" stuff is single hex, I always use this in preference. All the impact sockets are generally single hex as well, but often to big and bulky compared to thin wall kinchrome/sidchrome. Your existing sockets will be fine, they have very little torque and only loosen fasteners that aren't tight.

    seeya
    Shane L.
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    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  16. #66
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    Default makita cordless drills

    I'll have to agree with double chevron- I have the 18V version of theMakita Cordless drill- the 8391D. It is nothing short of brilliant. Cost was about $289 NZ, and it gets heavy home and work use- work use we use it to drill in anything up to 10mm dynabolts into concrete! My workmate was sceptical too- until he used mine- we got another and it's been just as good. Also the two batteries last a good amount of time, so as long as you are fully charged when you go on site- you don't run out.

    We got sick of buying the cheapo- $99 buck jobs from bunnings - this thing has enough grunt that we don't even bother taking the conventional electric drill with us to installations! Often use it all day on tek screwing- the two speed gearbox is a big plus too.

    FWIW- mine says it's made in China- what isn't these days!

    only gripe is sometimes it gets 'stuck' between gears- and you have to flick it into forward and reverse then it's fine, other than that it's been great.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renault17 View Post
    the two speed gearbox is a big plus too.
    I'd go as far as saying regardless of if it a $99 bosh cheapy or a $500 pro model, a gearbox is mandatory.

    Jo

  18. #68
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    this one has a 3 speed gearbox, variable speed drive (electronic/trigger)... also a secondary gearbox that allows section of clutched screwdriver (with variable settings), drill (no clutch slip) and hammer. It takes a bit to impress me, but this thing is as good as suggested.

    I think I'd still prefer a proper corded drill for drilling of "mass" holes, you see this type of work is requires constant power, you may run out of battery charge to quickly

    seeya,
    Shane L.
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    Proper cars--
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    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  19. #69
    bob
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    Default Taig Lathe

    G'day,

    not much use in the motor trade 'spose, unless you want to clean up a needle & seat, and who'd bother ? new ones are cheap as chips.

    This little sucker is for model makers & horologists etc. Made in the USA and offered as a kit:
    http://taig.com.au/index.php?main_pa...&products_id=7
    Local price is way too good to refuse. Just finished getting the basic animal together - the kit requires a bit of lapping and fitting.

    Now need to set up a drive motor & belts plus a little stand. The board it's sitting on in the pix was only for assembly purposes.

    Specs here:
    http://taig.com.au/index.php?main_pa...id=3&chapter=5

    cheers,
    Bob
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  20. #70
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob View Post
    G'day,

    not much use in the motor trade 'spose, unless you want to clean up a needle & seat, and who'd bother ? new ones are cheap as chips.

    This little sucker is for model makers & horologists etc. Made in the USA and offered as a kit:
    http://taig.com.au/index.php?main_pa...&products_id=7
    Local price is way too good to refuse. Just finished getting the basic animal together - the kit requires a bit of lapping and fitting.

    Now need to set up a drive motor & belts plus a little stand. The board it's sitting on in the pix was only for assembly purposes.

    Specs here:
    http://taig.com.au/index.php?main_pa...id=3&chapter=5

    cheers,
    Bob
    That's great. What do you make with small lathes like that? Can you rotate the cross slide bed so the slide winds in and out on an angle? (eg: cutting small tapers).

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
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    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  21. #71
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renault17 View Post
    I'll have to agree with double chevron- I have the 18V version of theMakita Cordless drill- the 8391D. It is nothing short of brilliant. Cost was about $289 NZ, and it gets heavy home and work use- work use we use it to drill in anything up to 10mm dynabolts into concrete! My workmate was sceptical too- until he used mine- we got another and it's been just as good. Also the two batteries last a good amount of time, so as long as you are fully charged when you go on site- you don't run out.

    We got sick of buying the cheapo- $99 buck jobs from bunnings - this thing has enough grunt that we don't even bother taking the conventional electric drill with us to installations! Often use it all day on tek screwing- the two speed gearbox is a big plus too.

    FWIW- mine says it's made in China- what isn't these days!

    only gripe is sometimes it gets 'stuck' between gears- and you have to flick it into forward and reverse then it's fine, other than that it's been great.
    My parents got me this drill for my birthday (18volt makita). Made in china .... it's a bloody ripper (my father probably figured the only way to get his own drill back was to buy me one ). The 12volt version doesn't seem any gruntier, however the batteries must last 4times as long as the 12volt version I'm amazed by the battery life on the 18volt one.

    seeya
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  22. #72
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    My 18v Makita had been sitting in storage for a year while we were OS. I brought it up here and started using it on the car, without charging. It has been going for a month now. I've no idea why I bought the second battery. When it eventually needs charging, it will take twenty minutes.

    That's the little one. The big 1/2" drive rattle gun will undo ANYTHING - crankshaft bolts, hub nuts, driveshafts, you name it. It's a bit brutal though. More Kenworth than Peugeot.

    Air tools are redundant.

    Tim

  23. #73
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
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    Default Boats, pools and ....lathes

    Finally I've found a lathe too, Bob.
    A mate, also a fellow fuego tragic has a retired dad with the best little den.



    A great feature of this lath is it location (elsewhere) and it comes with an operator skilled in its use.
    Here are my PS pump spacers being fabricated from alloy bar.
    Too easy.

    Jo
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  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by jo proffi View Post
    Finally I've found a lathe too, Bob.
    A mate, also a fellow fuego tragic has a retired dad with the best little den.



    A great feature of this lath is it location (elsewhere) and it comes with an operator skilled in its use.
    Here are my PS pump spacers being fabricated from alloy bar.
    Too easy.

    Jo
    What a ripper!!!! You tried to buy it from him right ???
    'Cit' homepage:
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    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  25. #75
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    What a ripper!!!! You tried to buy it from him right ???

    I think you missed my point Shane.

    Like a boat and a swimming pool, they are best when someone else owns and operates them and and i just swan in for the good times without having to deal with all the maintenence and skill set required to run the beast.

    The amount of custom lathe work i do is minuscule, and reserved for times like now when I'm doing a once in 5 year major restructure of the drive train.

    I do also have a master machinist on my books, who likes my silly curly real metal jobs i offer him. He likes getting his hands dirty like he did in the 'old days and it offers him some variety from CNC'ing artificial heart valves out of plastic.
    Things like re sleeving the R25 wishbone tubes to fit a thinner fuego bolt got him thinking and using his old world skills, and I must say he did a sterling job and charged me peanuts at the end. I think a heart valve replacement recipient might have subsidised that job.

    Jo

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