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  1. #26
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by citroenut View Post
    Shane , the problem with the Supersnipper is it's use of nylon lines that need olive ends, rather than cheap rolls. Of course you may be able to cut lengths & melt ends on them. However there are many disc type type line heads that use lengths of line which you can easily cut off cheap rolls. Raid the mower shops in your area for one which meets your needs. My professional experience with trimmer / brushcutters is that whether you choose bent or straight shaft there is no need to pay extortionate sums for Stihl stuff when there are a range of superior, cheaper, Japanese brands available.

    Cheers, Richard
    Hmm,

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    your probably right, I wish I could just get a plastic blade for the one here. I was hoping the nylon lines would be really thick like big cable ties ..... so not readily break off and take forever to wear away ......... Eg: a few of them would last as long as a real of normal stuff.

    I'll ask at the local mower places as you suggest. lazy and cheap is best

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/citro%EBn-forum/90325-best-project-car-you-have-ever-seen.html
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  2. #27
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
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    Hey Shane,

    Are you interested in a near new, straight shaft, 4 stroke Solo (German made) brushcutter? It has the "bicycle" handlebars and a proper harness, along with some useful accessories. Cheap! We bought it new and had not had it long when we got frustrated with it and bought a Stihl (which has been trouble-free). I can't remember exactly what trouble we had with it, but it went back to the dealers at least twice. I haven't started it for a while but I have been thinking of putting a carby kit in it so it runs OK and trying to sell it on eBay. You're welcome to try it and see what you think. It just might suit you.

    Roger

  3. #28
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Hi Roger,

    sounds interesting. Yeah sure I could take a look at it .... I'll tel SWMBO she needs to save more $$$ for you As long as it doesn't weigh a ton like the big straight shaft/bicyle handled contraption I have here now

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  4. #29
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
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    It's a farm size one, not a toy. but I don't reckon it is that heavy.

    Perhaps you could come to the farm one day after Christmas and check it out. It would take you not much more than 1-1/2 hours each way.

    Roger

  5. #30
    bob
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    Default Bit of lateral thinking

    G'day,

    came across this one the other day..

    http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/2791017.../Photo1862.jpg
    http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/2791017...e/100_0063.jpg

    nice piece of lateral thinking, and it works !

    the first one was the trial setup to make up the second one - on an old engine block.

    cheers,
    Bob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tool Talk-photo1862.jpg   Tool Talk-100_0063.jpg  
    Last edited by bob; 21st December 2010 at 07:21 PM. Reason: add images

  6. #31
    1000+ Posts Wildebeest's Avatar
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    Our old mates at "Bunno's" have some nice shiny "Craftsman" spanners in stock. One set of open enders has a ratcheting action.Another has a loose cranked end, not sure for why but like the Japanese some years back, if you design a gimmick someone will buy it.
    However I did buy, as cheap Crimbo gifts, some magnetic end pickup tools incorporating a light feature. $7 - $8.


    Psst. The Craftsman range of tools are part of the Sears and Roebuck group. I did notice they are made in China.
    Last edited by Wildebeest; 21st December 2010 at 06:27 PM. Reason: stuff

  7. #32
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
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    Bob,

    those photos seem to be on a yahoo group website that we cannot see.

    Roger

  8. #33
    bob
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    G'day,

    images downloaded and uploaded to original post ! Didn't even think about access - worked for me so I just assumed it worked for everybody, cookies at work.....

    cheers,
    Bob
    Last edited by bob; 21st December 2010 at 07:26 PM. Reason: typo

  9. #34
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob View Post
    G'day,

    came across this one the other day..

    http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/2791017.../Photo1862.jpg
    http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/2791017...e/100_0063.jpg

    nice piece of lateral thinking, and it works !

    the first one was the trial setup to make up the second one - on an old engine block.

    cheers,
    Bob
    Bob,

    That's already got me thinking... a 404 block ... A couple of rims and some torque tube as a stand... cut no 3 the bore down the side and you have a gap bed.

    Would perfect for machining a drum or disk and making basic parts.

    cheers

    Rob
    Mutual Respect is Contagious


  10. #35
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
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    Clever, Bob, but wouldn't it be easier to buy a second hand lathe? You would get power feeds, screw cutting, taper capability, a greater variety of speeds, a tailstock, a hollow spindle, and several other benefits that are not on the top off my head right now.

    Roger

  11. #36
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Wilkinson View Post
    Clever, Bob, but wouldn't it be easier to buy a second hand lathe? You would get power feeds, screw cutting, taper capability, a greater variety of speeds, a tailstock, a hollow spindle, and several other benefits that are not on the top off my head right now.

    Roger
    The device shown could be knocked together for the price of xy table ($200), chuck ($150) and a couple of bearing blocks &shaft ($200) and if you want to flash a tool holder ($100) . The rest is scrap. These are new prices.

    It's also very compact and would easily rival the accuracy of anything second hand. At the sub $1k end of the things it would be hard to buy anything secondhand other than a relic or wreck.

    Sure a small lathe would be better albeit at a much higher price. My observation is the value in secondhand lathes is not the machine itself, but the package of tools, face plates, steadies, centres, knurling rollers etc etc that come in the package if buying secondhand.

    A new lathe of reasonable size is fairly cheap, but buying the tools and accessories can easily cost more than the lathe purchase. If you want power feed and digital readout and serious thread cutting you can add 50% more.

    Something like the device shown would be fine for truing a disc, machining a drum, making a spacer or boring and tapping a bush. Or making a flange for an exhaust.

    I could justify $1k but not $2.5-3 k plus the tools and accessories for a real lathe.

    I was also impressed by the innovation and originality of the device.

    How is the move going ?

    cheers

    Rob
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  12. #37
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
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    Rob, you're right that the tooling is the pricey part. But the tooling requirement are the same for this contraption as for a conventional lathe.

    Yes, you could make it accurate, and a conventional lathe of the same price will be worn, but for the kind of simple jobs you are describing the wear in a worn lathe will not be an issue as you can generally achieve sufficient accuracy despite the wear.

    I see the lack of a tailstock as a serious limitation on the boring and tapping capabilities of this contraption.

    I also see the lack of decent gearing as another serious limitation. It would stall if you tried to machine a brake drum or disc. Proper lathes have back gearing for a reason.

    Power feeds, as on a proper lathe, provide a better finish than hand feeds, unless your hands are steady and your patience great.

    A proper lathe comes with a threaded spindle (1-1/2" by 8 tpi for your average Hercus or Atlas) so you can attach 3- and 4-jaw chucks, a face plate, or a driving plate interchangeably, and a Morse taper for inserting a centre. On this thing it would be hard to swap chucks.

    The innovation and originality is marvellous, I agree, but I think a proper lathe is much more useful, and I think available for less than the price you suggest. $2k would get you more than enough lathe, tooling and accessories, I reckon.

    "The move" is waiting for someone to buy my house.

    Roger

  13. #38
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Wilkinson View Post
    Rob, you're right that the tooling is the pricey part. But the tooling requirement are the same for this contraption as for a conventional lathe.

    Yes, you could make it accurate, and a conventional lathe of the same price will be worn, but for the kind of simple jobs you are describing the wear in a worn lathe will not be an issue as you can generally achieve sufficient accuracy despite the wear.

    I see the lack of a tailstock as a serious limitation on the boring and tapping capabilities of this contraption.

    I also see the lack of decent gearing as another serious limitation. It would stall if you tried to machine a brake drum or disc. Proper lathes have back gearing for a reason.

    Power feeds, as on a proper lathe, provide a better finish than hand feeds, unless your hands are steady and your patience great.

    A proper lathe comes with a threaded spindle (1-1/2" by 8 tpi for your average Hercus or Atlas) so you can attach 3- and 4-jaw chucks, a face plate, or a driving plate interchangeably, and a Morse taper for inserting a centre. On this thing it would be hard to swap chucks.

    The innovation and originality is marvellous, I agree, but I think a proper lathe is much more useful, and I think available for less than the price you suggest. $2k would get you more than enough lathe, tooling and accessories, I reckon.

    "The move" is waiting for someone to buy my house.

    Roger
    Roger,

    Of course you are correct.

    In reality, spend a bit more and get a lot more. If you purchase a good lathe they you will never go too far backwards on resale.

    It's a tool I really miss not having (or ever access to), for so many years I had a 600mm swing gap bed Colchester ready to use in my employers workshop. It was 40s era and a beautiful machine, only lacking metric thread cutting.

    These days I lack the space but would consider something like this if it came at good price...
    https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Pr...stockCode=L201

    In reality I couldn't justify the ownership- I wouldn't use it enough.

    Best of luck with the Sale, but things are very slow (in Melb) with a clearance rate of only around 50% last weekend...

    cheers

    Rob
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  14. #39
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by robmac View Post
    A new lathe of reasonable size is fairly cheap, but buying the tools and accessories can easily cost more than the lathe purchase.
    Rob
    A few years back a mates neighbour who was a hobo who wee'd in bottles and kept them all, finally died.

    He was an engineer or fitter and turner and the estate gave us permission to take anything we wanted before the second hand dealers moved in to clear the place.
    In the basement with the bottles of wee was an old lathe, far to big for me to remove but there were boxes and more boxes of reams and very large drill bits up to 2 inch.

    I took as much as I could physically carry, and kept them in my shed untill a good mate mentioned he was buying a lathe to work on his and his mates vintage bikes (indians, BSA).
    Being one of those types who likes to link people and things together, I told him of my barn find from a few years ago.
    HE nearly creamed himself when I gave him all these lathe tools.
    I dont know what a 1 inch drill bit or ream costs, but I bet its not cheap unless its from me.


    Jo

  15. #40
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Wow ... that Rob has listed sounds ok.... Made in Tiawan doesn't mean junk either. Your at $7,000 before you even buy the tooling though

    Rob your welcome to try the lathe here... When I have time (and when it's been paid for ) I'll need to go over it and adjust wear out of where ever possible. There is so much to learn, gee it turns so if you lock the back gearing in!

    I'm sure you could pick up a good 2nd hand lathe with all the tooling and acceptable wear for a couple of thousand (rather than $7,000 as the starting point ?).

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  16. #41
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    Wow ... that Rob has listed sounds ok.... Made in Tiawan doesn't mean junk either. Your at $7,000 before you even buy the tooling though

    Rob your welcome to try the lathe here... When I have time (and when it's been paid for ) I'll need to go over it and adjust wear out of where ever possible. There is so much to learn, gee it turns so if you lock the back gearing in!

    I'm sure you could pick up a good 2nd hand lathe with all the tooling and acceptable wear for a couple of thousand (rather than $7,000 as the starting point ?).

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    It's so much a new machine, but something of that ilk would be dream. I just don't have the space nor justification realistically.

    I would love to visit your workshop, Shane, I would like to see your setup. I also admire you determination and go-do-it attitude.

    Both get harder to maintain as you get older - I guess the stresses of children and business "steal" these from you. In my case there is fair degree of "earned" retirement laziness thrown in as well!
    Mutual Respect is Contagious


  17. #42
    bob
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    G'day,

    the pics I posted are one blokes effort to overcome a problem he had. It doesn't matter what size lather you get it will, one day, be too small for something you want to do.

    Personally, I would be happy with one of the Asian pencil sharpeners: https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Pr...stockCode=L194
    or this one: https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Pr...stockCode=L157 which has just so much more potential than the "cheaper" one, which is not so cheap when you option it to the same "trim level" as the second one, they are within a few dollars of being the same...... You wonder how they manage to sell the first one. Even smaller than these would suit my immediate requirements - but I haven't come across anything that impressed yet.

    The bigger one again that Rob posted is a top machine, I know a bloke in a small engineering business with a similar animal and he swears by it.

    cheers,
    Bob

  18. #43
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Oh gee's,

    I hope I paid enough for Rogers lathe... Look at the cost of just the chucks on that website It looks like the chucks the lathe came with are worth more than I've paid for the lathe

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  19. #44
    sans witticism SLC206's Avatar
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    Bunnings are currently selling two sets of Craftsman spanners at the moment (which is unusual in itself).

    They have a set of 4 open ended ratcheting spanners (8-10mm, 13-14mm, 15-16mm, 17-19mm). Anyway, the set was $34.95 so I bought them for amusement value. It's a shame there's no 11mm one, so you can use it on a CitroŽn, but there you go.

    The best way to describe them is with a picture:



    They also had this set of elbow 7 ratcheting spanners (10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 19 mm) - which at $130 stayed on the shelf:



    If you push on the black pivot, the pivoting head locks in position, otherwise it is free to move in to any position.

    Both sets were only available in metric.
    Regards,

    Simon

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  20. #45
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    Oh gee's,

    I hope I paid enough for Rogers lathe... Look at the cost of just the chucks on that website It looks like the chucks the lathe came with are worth more than I've paid for the lathe

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    Whaddya mean you paid? You haven't paid a bean yet.

    Seriously, I charged you what I paid for it. It is pretty worn. Yes, the chucks are good. And you have been pretty good to me over the years. When you come down to check out that Solo brushcutter you will be able to check out the lathe I am keeping.

    Roger

  21. #46
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Wilkinson View Post
    Whaddya mean you paid? You haven't paid a bean yet.

    Seriously, I charged you what I paid for it. It is pretty worn. Yes, the chucks are good. And you have been pretty good to me over the years. When you come down to check out that Solo brushcutter you will be able to check out the lathe I am keeping.

    Roger
    Sounds good, I'll give you a call when your down at the farm.

    This is what I mean by to big... My father bought this thing about 20years ago. We have probably used it for only a few hours in that time. It looked almost unused when we got it, it was ex-council, but obviously far to heavy to use, so they got rid of it..... Then we found it to heavy to use for any length of time. It was lent to a relative for a couple of years and came back with no cord retractor and stuffed worn out blades ( ... don't lend anything out). He must have cleared 5acres of gorse with it. It even has grease nipples on the shaft.

    It ended up my my shed when my parents shifted a few years ago, so i put petrol in it and it started straight up ... by god it has some compression, they must not have fitted decompression vavles back then. I did the yard with it (gee's you can make some sparks off metal fences with a toothed blade in 'em ) ... My old man doesn't want it back, so I guess it's mine now. Brilliant thing for clearing brush, but no good for doing around the 50trees in the yard

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tool Talk-p1050048.jpg   Tool Talk-p1050047.jpg   Tool Talk-p1050046.jpg   Tool Talk-p1050045.jpg  
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  22. #47
    1000+ Posts bluey504's Avatar
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    Default Dog is smarter than you think....

    The canine obviously has more smarts than you give it credit for. Look how he's keeping well away from the business end as he realises that the teeth it possess are a touch more 'bitey' than his.
    Also he saw you operate the beast and has surmised that "Best to be of good behavior or Daddy might get angry."

    From my end of the Pond hope everyone has a great Christmas and Santa brings you all sorts of goodies, buggered if I know how he's going to fit a four poster hoist down the chimney! Bluey504

  23. #48
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
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    Default Bondage fettish

    This is the best christmas!!! I have made a connection i thought i lost.
    http://boatlocker.com.au/
    I like getting custom made ropes for stuff, and cant stand using crappy quality rope, as it usually ends in tears (doesn't it shane).

    I stumbled across an old shipwright/second hand merchant who I thought had retired, but he had just moved premises.
    I found the most beatiful nylon rope in his shop.
    Its nothing like the standard silver polyester crap you by at bunnings, and is a very tight spun rope, and incredibly soft to the hand.

    It was originally an anchor rope, but as a trailer rope, its new task it will excel, as being tightly spun will not knot or catch on things and being nylon will slide with ease over the load and through the tie down bar and back again when I'm removing it.

    The best bit is that by getting my stuff from this guy, he will terminate the ropes 'old school' way, which I absolutely love.
    I'm too lazy to learn how to braid and whip lines, so I'm more than happy to buy my gear from this guy and wait an extra day for this exceptional service.
    $30 well spent in my opinion.

    Jo



    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tool Talk-whipped-end.jpg   Tool Talk-loop-end.jpg  

  24. #49
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jo proffi View Post
    This is the best christmas!!! I have made a connection i thought i lost.
    http://boatlocker.com.au/
    I like getting custom made ropes for stuff, and cant stand using crappy quality rope, as it usually ends in tears (doesn't it shane).

    I stumbled across an old shipwright/second hand merchant who I thought had retired, but he had just moved premises.
    I found the most beatiful nylon rope in his shop.
    Its nothing like the standard silver polyester crap you by at bunnings, and is a very tight spun rope, and incredibly soft to the hand.

    It was originally an anchor rope, but as a trailer rope, its new task it will excel, as being tightly spun will not knot or catch on things and being nylon will slide with ease over the load and through the tie down bar and back again when I'm removing it.

    The best bit is that by getting my stuff from this guy, he will terminate the ropes 'old school' way, which I absolutely love.
    I'm too lazy to learn how to braid and whip lines, so I'm more than happy to buy my gear from this guy and wait an extra day for this exceptional service.
    $30 well spent in my opinion.

    Jo



    If you are lazy. Heat shrink tube with the inbuilt thermoset adhesive does a good on the ends to stop fraying and doesn't need skill to get a good result.
    Mutual Respect is Contagious


  25. #50
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jo proffi View Post
    This is the best christmas!!! I have made a connection i thought i lost.
    http://boatlocker.com.au/
    I like getting custom made ropes for stuff, and cant stand using crappy quality rope, as it usually ends in tears (doesn't it shane).

    I stumbled across an old shipwright/second hand merchant who I thought had retired, but he had just moved premises.
    I found the most beatiful nylon rope in his shop.
    Its nothing like the standard silver polyester crap you by at bunnings, and is a very tight spun rope, and incredibly soft to the hand.

    It was originally an anchor rope, but as a trailer rope, its new task it will excel, as being tightly spun will not knot or catch on things and being nylon will slide with ease over the load and through the tie down bar and back again when I'm removing it.

    The best bit is that by getting my stuff from this guy, he will terminate the ropes 'old school' way, which I absolutely love.
    I'm too lazy to learn how to braid and whip lines, so I'm more than happy to buy my gear from this guy and wait an extra day for this exceptional service.
    $30 well spent in my opinion.

    Jo



    I wonder if he posts rope out in the mail
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

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