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  1. #251
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fordman View Post
    That's good value with the impact driver included - haven't got one of them yet!

    Advertisement


    I use the impact driver 4 times as much as the drill

    The only down side is for the low price they supply 2.4 AH batteries. But there 3 off.

    The Milwaukee batteries, even the 4.8ah are reasonably priced.
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  2. #252
    1000+ Posts okalford's Avatar
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    Aldi have this 5 pack of Li-Ion power tools on sale next week, looks like a good buy with 2 batteries and a carry case:

    http://aldi.com.au/au/html/offers/28...12-07-30-07-04


    I settled for this one which should suit my minimal needs, it came with two batteries that are easy to change with one button to push.

    http://www.masters.com.au/product/90...-driver-cd142l

    Thanks again for all the feedback.

    K

  3. #253
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    Wise choice Kaye! It's not like your repairing trains for a living, Mmm that's what I do! Our problem is lack of 240V power that's safe/accessible and the trained idiot who buys our tools. Cheap is the first and only requirement, well it seems so IMHO.
    No use buying a power tool if every time you use it it tries to maim you (Isn't that's why we have Shane as the Aussie Frog Buster?). SWMBO is a petite thing, and I'm not being a suck, all 4'12" of her and a goal weight of 8.5 stone (Come on fella's you do the conversion as I had to "Imperial" it!) Whilst a touch over the 'gravity download' you can quickly work out why the Darl isn't in London competing in the hammer throw.
    When she has bought tools for Her exclusive use they must fit via grip and be able to used to it's full potential. No point getting a Spear and Jackson No 5 if when fully laden SWMBO can't pick it up!
    Similar happens when the oversize is applied,.
    Cheers,
    Brendan

  4. #254
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    90L sandblasting cabinet with light and gun with ceramic tips, 60L parts washer with pump from Supercheap for $248 total.
    At that price what could possibly go wrong?...go wrong?...go wrong?...

  5. #255
    1000+ Posts FIVEDOOR's Avatar
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    Cheap spray booth

    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Car-spray...#ht_477wt_1417

    Soda blasting and spray booth hire - Victoria
    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Soda-Blas...ht_1193wt_1394

    Cardboard Filter for Spray Booth Exhaust/Overspray
    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Cardboard...#ht_477wt_1417

  6. #256
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    Default cheap tools

    Every once in a while i buy a cheap tool to remind myself why i dont buy cheap tools, i usually end up regretting my decision to be a tight arse and end up having to buy the proper anyway because i have managed to break the cheap piece of - - - - ! that that i bought trying to save few dollars or worse still damage whatever i am working on or injure myself
    If you've got too much traction, you haven't got enough horse power ...




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  7. #257
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Psychlone View Post
    90L sandblasting cabinet with light and gun with ceramic tips, 60L parts washer with pump from Supercheap for $248 total.
    At that price what could possibly go wrong?...go wrong?...go wrong?...
    Now all you need is about 25CFM of air to drive the sand blaster and your set (I have 17CFM and 12CFM compressor daisy chained together .... it's almost enough).

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  8. #258
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron View Post
    Now all you need is about 25CFM of air to drive the sand blaster and your set (I have 17CFM and 12CFM compressor daisy chained together .... it's almost enough).

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    lol! The box claims 5CFM at 40-80PSI so this is going to be interesting!

  9. #259
    1000+ Posts FIVEDOOR's Avatar
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    I did fair bit of sand blasting on a 1600 Datsun way back when, with something closer to 12-15 cfm. Worked fine, if bit slow. The visor on the helmet was never the same. (Taped the visor and sealed bottom of helmet with scarf/towel etc). Haven't used blasting cabinet though.

  10. #260
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    Default Torque Wrenches.....

    Ok, it's about time I bought a Torque Wrench. Been putting it off for years, but becoming a neccesity.

    On a bit of a tight-ish budget, but I don't belive in buying crap - I can also see the possible need to buy two - a 'primary use' 1/2 drive & a smaller 3/8 or even 1/4 drive for smaller work.....

    So.......

    Have been looking at used Warren & Brown units - they go for about half the price of new ones. Are there any other brands people would recommend (new or used), and what do people think about deflecting beam-style Vs Micrometer style....

    Cheers

  11. #261
    BVH Roger Wilkinson's Avatar
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    There's nothing to go wrong with a Warren and Brown torque wrench. Which is just as well because you can't adjust them. The Warren and Brown 3220 my father bought 50 or 60 years ago is still in good order, and the design is little changed today. I also like the Stahlwille 730 type, as they are easily set, fully adjustable, can be used in either direction, can have different heads inserted into them and all the mechanism is well protected.

    Micrometer type torque wrenches are supposed to be unscrewed or released when not in use, to avoid straining the spring. Also they are generally optimised for either NM or ft.lb, even if they are calibrated for both. They might have two sets of markings along the body, but they generally have only one set of markings around the thimble.

    I have 3 micrometer type torque wrenches I no longer require. All are 1/2" square drive. There is a very good one with a huge torque range, a no-name one that works fine, and one that is old and solid but a bit rough. If you are interested I can provide more information.

    Roger

  12. #262
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    G'day,

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Wilkinson View Post
    There's nothing to go wrong with a Warren and Brown torque wrench. ...........
    +1, Had my "normal" size one for close on to 50 years, really nice unit Liked it so much that I recently picked up a tichy version that was on special at a local tool shop - no more guess work, is it tight enough/too tight in alloy ?

    cheers,
    Bob

  13. #263
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    An inaccurate torque wrench is about as useful as a hip pocket in a singlet.
    Unless you can cross check with a known accurate unit or better still on a testing unit with the facility for calibration (as is often required) then you're better off without.
    Accuracy within a parameter is what it's all about.

    A used torque wrench of unknown provenance, indeterminate age and untested or uncalibrated, not for me.
    Defeats the purpose of having the tool, other than guaranteeing an unknown torque being the same on the applied fastener thread.

  14. #264
    bob
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    G'day Richo,

    Quote Originally Posted by richo View Post
    An inaccurate torque wrench is about as useful as a hip pocket in a singlet.....
    at least it's a tool that is easy to check, at home, without certified lab instruments - at least to the level of accuracy required in the home workshop !

    And, if all else fails or you just can't be bothered, W&B are just up the road at Maidstone with agents all over this land of ours

    cheers,
    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by bob View Post
    G'day Richo,



    at least it's a tool that is easy to check, at home, without certified lab instruments - at least to the level of accuracy required in the home workshop !

    And, if all else fails or you just can't be bothered, W&B are just up the road at Maidstone with agents all over this land of ours

    cheers,
    Bob
    Bob,
    As someone who uses and requires accuracy in a torque wrench, please share your procedure on how you check accuracy, at home.

    I have a number of torque wrenches and they are accurate, checked and adjusted as required.
    Two are permanently set to a specific torque and dedicated for a single tas use on Citroen hydraulic work.
    The others are equally as important, especially to be accurate.

  16. #266
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    So, Richo - I don't disagree with anything you've said, but what's your point??

    Do you not recommend buying 2nd hand, or do you recommend simply getting them checked regularly??

    What wrenches do YOU use?

    If the Warren & Brown units can't be adjusted, that would imply that they either don't fall out of adjustment, or if they do, you throw them away.....

  17. #267
    bob
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    G'day,

    Quote Originally Posted by richo View Post
    Bob,
    As someone who uses and requires accuracy in a torque wrench, please share your procedure on how you check accuracy, at home.......
    they are essentially a simple device to provide a specified force at a specified distance. It's not real difficult to create a simple rig to convey this torque to a brick on a stick, our measuring tapes are pretty good as are the digi-scales, a bit of maths will account for the stick.....

    I would suggest that such testing would well & truly meet most of our requirements, particularly when you think about the immensely variable frictional effects of the fasteners, whether or not your "sense" of force application in the use of the tool is precisely the same every time you pick it up and you only every use the thing in the same plane. Gawd, there's that many variables it's not funny.

    If your use demands something a little better, like I said, W&B are not far away.

    cheers,
    Bob

  18. #268
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wombat200 View Post
    So, Richo - I don't disagree with anything you've said, but what's your point??
    The way I read it is, 'Get a new quality torque wrench'.

    I have two half-inch drive torque tools. An expensive sidchrome deflecting beam wrench that lives in its box in a cupboard, and hardly ever gets taken out, and a crapy deflecting pointer type I bought for $2 at a garage sale.
    The cheapy gets used for crappy jobs or to get stuff close (can wind it backwards too so its like a calibrated breaker bar) and gets loaned out when mates want to borrow stuff.




    There is a cheap tool which might make home calibration easy.....

    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/DIGITAL-T...7#ht_904wt_918


    Here is a review, which nicely states its limitations when used to replace a deflecting beam type.

    http://www.epinions.com/review/Alltr...291896964?sb=1



    Jo

  19. #269
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Wilkinson View Post
    There's nothing to go wrong with a Warren and Brown torque wrench. Which is just as well because you can't adjust them. Roger
    Hi Roger, dont understand this. Every W & B torque wrench I have used is adjustable. The little square black thing which slides up the scale is screwed into the sliding section of the torque wrench. Simply undo the knurled nut enough to remove the sliding piece and screw the square piece in or out to change the calibration.

    When I was an apprentice, one of the tradesmen I was working with kept breaking head bolts (on early Falcon engines - what the?). We checked his torque wrench and he had screwed the adjuster right in to "tighten it up", thereby increasing the torque by 20-30 ft/lbs every time he used it!

    A handy calibration method is to have a known accurate torque wrench (the W&B type), clamp the handle part horizontally in a vice, use a 1/2" square adaptor to link the other torque wrench to it, and get them bothe to click at the same time. Good enough is near enough.

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  20. #270
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    Quote Originally Posted by jo proffi View Post
    The way I read it is, 'Get a new quality torque wrench'.

    You can buy the best measuring tools in existance & treat them well, but they will only remain a known accuracy value if tested/calibrated regularly, hence the question - Does Richo do that? I'm not having a go - just curious.

    Back when I was a patternmaker, all the measuring equipment - including personal tools - was checked & calibrated every six months, buy a handful of us trained to do it...... It would then be tagged if in range, or prohibited from use in the shop if not.....

  21. #271
    1000+ Posts Wildebeest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fordman View Post
    Hi Roger, dont understand this. Every W & B torque wrench I have used is adjustable. The little square black thing which slides up the scale is screwed into the sliding section of the torque wrench. Simply undo the knurled nut enough to remove the sliding piece and screw the square piece in or out to change the calibration.

    When I was an apprentice, one of the tradesmen I was working with kept breaking head bolts (on early Falcon engines - what the?). We checked his torque wrench and he had screwed the adjuster right in to "tighten it up", thereby increasing the torque by 20-30 ft/lbs every time he used it!

    A handy calibration method is to have a known accurate torque wrench (the W&B type), clamp the handle part horizontally in a vice, use a 1/2" square adaptor to link the other torque wrench to it, and get them bothe to click at the same time. Good enough is near enough.


    Thanks Fordman,
    I'm afraid a lot of these old ideas are vanishing from the recesses over time. The W&B test yes.
    I thought there was a set and forget calibration on my old W&B that I'd picked up at a swapmeet.
    It was necessary to replace the "signal" button and spring. Coventry's* Morley workshop recalibrated it for me. As it had an original foot pounds scale they fitted a metal foot lb's/sq" and newton metre scale plate to it.
    I then had it chrome plated after refiling the knurled handle. I couldn't be bothered now.

    Some sound argument has been put forward on the merits of different types of tension/torque wrenches but I'm convinced the W&B type are the best.

    * I wonder who does this type of work now that Cov's are a market. All the staff [old] now retired?

  22. #272
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    I also wonder if "professional" workshops calibrate their tools regularly? Is that part of being a "certified dealer"?
    I also wonder if the manual writers and manufacturers expect tools to calibrated to the "nth degree" of accuracy?

    I would have thought for most applications, especially mass produced components that a certain error (or tolerance) is allowable. Especially so with older manufacturing (1950-1960)

    It's nice to have new tools, regularly calibrated, all secured in controlled humidity glass front cabinet but most of us have to settle for a Kinchrome torque wrench, in the metal locker kept away from the more aggressive processes in our workshops. Since it may be used half a dozen times year then I see that as perfectly fine. I know mine hasn't been calibrated in 6 years or so.

    People who make a living out of repair and refurbishment of auto assemblies and run a mini machine shop may have different needs and expectations of their tools to the large majority of AFers.

    I also suspect personality dictates the choice as tools as well as functionality.

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  23. #273
    Fellow Frogger! wombat200's Avatar
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    Robmac, that's pretty much where my thoughts on accuracy would have sat - IE allowable tolerances.

    Do you have the Kingchrome beam type, or Micrometer type, and have you any good/bad comments about it?

    Rob.
    Last edited by wombat200; 13th August 2012 at 02:21 PM.

  24. #274
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    Quote Originally Posted by wombat200 View Post
    You can buy the best measuring tools in existance & treat them well, but they will only remain a known accuracy value if tested/calibrated regularly, hence the question - Does Richo do that? I'm not having a go - just curious.

    Back when I was a patternmaker, all the measuring equipment - including personal tools - was checked & calibrated every six months, buy a handful of us trained to do it...... It would then be tagged if in range, or prohibited from use in the shop if not.....
    Yes, the two specific task wrenches are tested regularly and calibrated when necessary at a precision toolmakers. Which to this time has only been once.
    Whilst they are expensive items, they are far from new. The others, yes, I have four in total are near new and have been checked.

    As you're a patternmaker I am surprised you are even asking or questioning about whether to purchase a quality or precision measuring device second hand. A torque wrench is no different in its requirements for accuracy to that of a micrometer or caliper. The difference is that a test bar is often supplied with a quality instrument.

    That these tools are used for precise hydraulic work on Citroens has no bearing.
    They were owned well before that time.

  25. #275
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    Quote Originally Posted by robmac View Post
    I also wonder if "professional" workshops calibrate their tools regularly? Is that part of being a "certified dealer"?
    I also wonder if the manual writers and manufacturers expect tools to calibrated to the "nth degree" of accuracy?

    I would have thought for most applications, especially mass produced components that a certain error (or tolerance) is allowable. Especially so with older manufacturing (1950-1960)

    It's nice to have new tools, regularly calibrated, all secured in controlled humidity glass front cabinet but most of us have to settle for a Kinchrome torque wrench, in the metal locker kept away from the more aggressive processes in our workshops. Since it may be used half a dozen times year then I see that as perfectly fine. I know mine hasn't been calibrated in 6 years or so.

    People who make a living out of repair and refurbishment of auto assemblies and run a mini machine shop may have different needs and expectations of their tools to the large majority of AFers.

    I also suspect personality dictates the choice as tools as well as functionality.

    Accuracy in torque wrenches. Usually around 3% dependent upon many qualifications.

    I do happen to earn my crusts working on the hydraulic components of older Citroens, the manufacturer certainly expected accuracy, that's what they earned their reputation for in the 1950s and 1960s.
    Perhaps Rob you might spend a little time researching Citroens abilities in those times. They set the benchmark.

    Safety and quality dictates this accuracy, especially for other peoples cars.

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