Cross drilling brake rotors?
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Cross drilling brake rotors?

    Hi guys,

    I tried searching the posts in case this was repeating something that had been raised previously....but couldn't find it.

    On my race car fuego I am going to put race type pads in the front brakes, is it worth cross drilling them - is it worth it for the saving in unsprung weight alone? I understand that they do it mainly so that it cleans the face of the pads- or is that slotting them? Either way can this be done on a suitable drill press at home -or is it a leave it to the professionals job...

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    Cheers Ben

    ps I've swiped a later version disc brake rear end too- so will put that on as well. head_ban

  2. #2
    1000+ Posts CHRI'S16's Avatar
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    Ben,
    recently having done the rotors (ebc pads/discs) on my car i was tought that cross drilling is being phased out as it weakens the rotor, i can't back it up with mutch except that on the WRC cars most use slotted rotors only, not crossdrilled, although being huge thick and with calipers/pads/fluid to match.
    You are right when you say that they wipe at the face of the pad, mostly to stop glazing. The most cost efective is just pads and a god fluid, but make sure they arn't too brutal on your discs too, if they are in good shape have them machined and sloted which is probably best left to a workshop.
    my 2 francs, but some of the more "hands on" froggers might have better advise.
    Xq
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  3. #3
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    deffo do not drill them yourself! They will be unsafe and may even shatter as you will have weakened them. As well do not get a pro to do it...same story!
    The only way really to have cross drilled rotors is to buy them direct already done from the manufacturer/retailer. These will have alot less chance of cracking however if you get them hot on the track and then it rains or u go thru a puddle
    CRACKO!!
    Having said that i personnally havent ever had a prob with cross drilled all these years.
    Your better way to good braking may be to source a larger discs from another car [wreckers] that would fit and then shift the calipers on a made up bracket. Most performance workshops could help u here. cheers jr
    jr20516v

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  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger! Reno17's Avatar
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    Yea pretty much what Jr20516v said.

    I would'nt go for crossdrilled rotors. I've heard a few people having dramas with them cracking and not lasting the distance.
    Your proberley best off going for a set of DBA Slotted rotors, thing is I dont think DBA do any renault rotors in slotted or crossdrilled, ya might have to get them made up for ya.
    Which ya can get done, they just take a little longer for em to make.
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  5. #5
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    Halleleujah to what has been said.
    From my own personal experience, going to grooved rotors will give you a hugely improved pedal, without any apparent downside. I have fitted Bradi grooved rotors to 89 405 Mi16 and the improvement is huge, as experienced at Pukekohe racetrack during '02 Targa NZ spectator tour and subsequent days in tour to Wellington at high speeds on closed roads. Now my daily driver '91 Mi16 seems undebraked.
    Im sure any locally available brand of grooved fronts will give you the braking you want without risks of cracking.
    Cheers
    Don wink

  6. #6
    1000+ Posts Haakon's Avatar
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    DBA do have a listing for Fuegos and are fairy reasonable for a set of slotted rotors (looked into it a while ago. These are for GTX - do use turbo discs? But I suspect they will make just about anything for you given the specs... Otherwise as someone said, just use bit brake off just about anything (I reckon Pug 605 front brakes would be fairly chunky! or Volvo or someting) All you need is to get the disc modified for the stud pattern if required and the hub, and get a mounting bracket made up in high tensile steel to mount the caliper.

    Post us some pics of your car. I'd love to see a racing Fuego!!

    Next question - where did you get the rear discs and can I get some pretty please?!!
    I tried to drown my sorrows in alcohol, but the bastards learnt how to swim

  7. #7
    Cal
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    I am about to get a set of new standard Peugeot disks slotted my a mate of mine. They do their own for an Evo 3 Lancer which finished in the top ten in the Australian Rally Championship. They have never had any problems slotting their own rotors. Drilling is a different story though.

    Cal.
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  8. #8
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    Not certain, but I'm PRETTY sure that cross drilled rotors would be heat treated after drilling to remove any stresses, then the face would be turned. I definitely would drill them myself, as they could warp after the first big stop.

    Stu


    2003 PEUGEOT 206 GTi

  9. #9
    Fellow Frogger! Andreas's Avatar
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    Many drilled discs (porsche anyway) dont have the holes drilled, instead they are cast already with the holes, that's what i've read, i may be wrong.
    I've had my drilled discs for years without any problems.

  10. #10
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    Yeah I think you're right Andreas. If you look at the internal surface of the holes in some new 'drilled' discs on the shelf, they are sometimes rough-ish, like they've been cast in. Could be just the plating process (light gold on some - cadmium?) but looks like casting roughness.

    Cheers, Stu


    2003 PEUGEOT 206 GTi

  11. #11
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Cheers for the replies guys,

    so it's agreed then that slotting rotors is safer and better than drilling?
    I should have also mentioned that the standard brakes are slotted rotors and I will probably just change the pads (high performance linings) and racing quality brake fluid. I am trying to do this car as cheaply as possible (keeping saftery in mind) just to see what I can build up for $2000.

    ANyone know how much it is to get rotors slotted?

    THe other reason I was looking into drilled rotors was to lower the unsprung weight and get more 'free'/cheap handling improvements....
    So far I have the car, drivetrain, and steering wheel for $90!!- steering wheel cost me $70!!

    Haakon- the disc braked rear end I got of an 18 estate- a reno nut had been doing it up, my brother and I wrecked it-it was a rust bucket...!!
    But complete with a fully reco'd rear end- discs ground, new pads, new paint, bushes etc!!

    Any later model fuego turbos, and 18 turbos had them in NZ I assume that was where this came off....

    Cheers Ben

  12. #12
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    Hi Ben, just note that 'proper' racing brake fluid is apparently more hygroscopic than 'normal' brake fluid and will require more frequent changing otherwise the internals corrode.


    2003 PEUGEOT 206 GTi

  13. #13
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    Hey Stuey,

    yeah but as this is a race car it'll be getting a little more attention with things such as that- so the hassle of changing the brake fluid a bit more than normal should be no problem. I will keep an eye on the corrosion though...

    A small typo in my last post- it should have read " vented rotors as standard"- not slotted.

    So what is the approx cost of getting rotors slotted- anyone know? Has anyone upgraded their brakes on a fuego to know if the different pads make much of a difference?

    Also for something which is to be a race car- but also driven to and from the track on occassion - can anyone suggest a brake compound suitable- i,e semi race? are the race compounds really unfriendly on the road (cold!)

    cheers Ben

  14. #14
    2000+ Brad's Avatar
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    EBC have a huge range so should make both Blackstuff (Street Kevlar) and Greenstuff. The blacks are pretty much a non carbon replacement for the OEM's at usually a lower price, while the Greenstuff are a semi-race compound suitable for hard road driving. On a light car such as a 17, Greenstuff would be perfect.

    Though I do know the EBC range only have Blackstuff and Greenstuff for 306's as they are considered too light to warrant more serious compounds.

    Here is a quick breakdown of their range.

    Street Kevlar - This Kevlar based formulation is guaranteed to meet or exceed performance of all original equipment pads with strong progressive braking, reduction of dust on wheels and fantastic wear life. Recommended for medium to high speed freeway use, general suburban and city commuting and for towing and touring. Test with excellent results on 4x4 vehicles both on and off road in tough conditions.

    Greenstuff - This pad features a high Kevlar content formulation resulting in an ultra high performance road pad which is extremely kind to discs. With a friction so-efficient of around 0.5 and a high resistance to brake fade (650șC) this pad is a superb upgrade for high performance street cars, high speed freeway use and consecutive heavy braking. If you are experiencing brake fade with your heavily loaded 4x4 or towing vehicle, you should be using Greenstuff!

    Yellowstuff - EBC's flagship race compound. Yellowstuff is EBC's longest lasting full race compound, again exhibiting zero brake disc damage. Yellowstuff has an average friction level of 0.34 delivering awesome stopping power right up to 900șC.

    Bluestuff - The ultimate long distance endurance pad for those cars doing lots of motoracing. Available in over a 100 profiles for the most popular caliper. Still very kind to brake rotors but lasts and lasts. Works best when under temperature.
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