landi de lorenzo LPG Converters
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  1. #1
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    Default landi de lorenzo LPG Converters

    Howdy guys I know you guys don't ususally talk about LPG converstions but I have some questions about Landi LPG converters.

    Does anyone have or had anything to do with these ?

    I have an OMVL system on V8 at the moment and I want to change it over for the landi one as I am told they provide a more smooth idle and stable system.

    Now the OMVL system works pretty well but my wife won't drive it because it can be a bit tempermental.

    Just looking at the landi now, there is only one adjustment screw on the converter which I can assume is the idle control and the other flow is metered by the adjustment screw in the dry gas line.

    Anyone got any comments or info on this ? Are my assumptions correct ?

    Here are the units I have , I have to strip them down and put seals in them

    Thanks guys

    Tom

    Here is a pikky of the two units



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  2. #2
    1000+ Posts Fordman's Avatar
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    I thought the OMVL was supposed to be top stuff but I've not used it, so not much help there, I'm afraid. I have also found that it may be more economical to buy a new converter instead of the overhaul kit in some cases, especially if internal corrosion is a problem.

    What I did put on my old XF (Falcon) when I overhauled the engine and the LPG system - was electronic control of the LPG. It was surprisingly inexpensive and improved the economy quite a bit. I think it still relies on the converter adjustment for idle, but at all other speeds it uses the Oxygen Sensor (which I had to fit being a carby model) to continually adjust the LPG mixture to get optimum mixture at all times. I think there was actually a selection where you could have automatic idle mixture as well.
    The electronic module and the stepper valve cost about $200 and I paid about $100 for a late model Oxy sensor.
    With one of these fitted I believe you dont need a fancy converter, because the stepper valve is correcting the mixture anyway.

    I am a qualified mechanic (semi-retired), and took a course to get LPG licensed mainly so I can legally work on my own car - I learned about the control systems at the training course a couple of years ago.

    Cheers
    Fordman.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fordman
    I thought the OMVL was supposed to be top stuff but I've not used it, so not much help there, I'm afraid. I have also found that it may be more economical to buy a new converter instead of the overhaul kit in some cases, especially if internal corrosion is a problem.

    What I did put on my old XF (Falcon) when I overhauled the engine and the LPG system - was electronic control of the LPG. It was surprisingly inexpensive and improved the economy quite a bit. I think it still relies on the converter adjustment for idle, but at all other speeds it uses the Oxygen Sensor (which I had to fit being a carby model) to continually adjust the LPG mixture to get optimum mixture at all times. I think there was actually a selection where you could have automatic idle mixture as well.
    The electronic module and the stepper valve cost about $200 and I paid about $100 for a late model Oxy sensor.
    With one of these fitted I believe you dont need a fancy converter, because the stepper valve is correcting the mixture anyway.

    I am a qualified mechanic (semi-retired), and took a course to get LPG licensed mainly so I can legally work on my own car - I learned about the control systems at the training course a couple of years ago.

    Cheers
    Fordman.
    Sounds greaty fordman, thanks for the info any details on where you got them and what you got as far as the auto correcting system (or closed system as the Uk guys call it) I would really love to run one of these and for around $300 that would be great, I wonder how it would go working in with my car's ecu and idle control mechanism, although my car doesn't currently employ oxygen sensors.

    Cheers
    Tom

  4. #4
    1000+ Posts Fordman's Avatar
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    Default More info

    Firstly, in answer to your original question, quote "Just looking at the landi now, there is only one adjustment screw on the converter which I can assume is the idle control and the other flow is metered by the adjustment screw in the dry gas line."

    Yes, the screw on the converter is the idle adjuster.

    The "high-speed" mixture can be controlled by a simple "fixed orifice" (which is adjustable) in the delivery line to the "mixer" on the carby intake. However, with the electronic control this is replaced by a "variable orifice" or stepper valve which is controlled electrically by the electronic module. My stepper valve has a maximum flow adjustment (which is the same function as a fixed orifice) then has a movable orifice which continually meters the gas flow between idle and high speed.

    Yes, we also call it a "closed loop" system.

    The module, stepper valve and wiring harness were from the company Gore Research although I purchased them locally (Perth) from a normal LPG equipment shop.

    http://www.gore-research.com.au/

    I used an FP30 processor kit (see details in above website) and I fitted a 3-wire Oxygen Sensor from a 1996 Ford (for ease of replacement parts - plus I had a workshop manual showing the wiring diagram). I had to drill & tap the exhaust manifold to fit the sensor. One wire from the sensor went to the electronic module, one was 12 volt from ignition source, and I think the other was an earth?

    I also fitted an Auto-Meter brand air/fuel ratio meter, which besides telling you its all working OK, is a bit of fun to watch the LED's flicking back & forth (I really need to get a life!). Gauge is not necessary though, because the module (under the bonnet) also has LED's for setting up purposes to ensure the mixture is correct.

    I gather you are in the UK? For explanation the Falcon engine is 4.1 litre six, so you can relate that to your V8 for capacity?

    I remember looking around quite a bit on internet, and I remember there were specialist sites in the UK with various forms of this sort of equipment.

    Cheers.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the great info Fordman,

    What sort of economy did you pick up ?

    It is for a 1991 Range Rover 3.9V8 and I am in Brisbane, I really need to fix up my profile sorry,

    Regards
    Tom
    Last edited by tcns; 8th November 2005 at 04:50 PM.

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