replacing mi16 rear pads
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! enthused!'s Avatar
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    Default replacing mi16 rear pads

    Hi all.

    I have a 1992 mi16 which is need of new rear brake pads. i have the haynes manual (somewhere) which should outline the procedure, but i just wanted to check from those who know a bit more than Mr Haynes:

    Any special instructions/things to watch out for when replacing the rear pads?

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    are there any tricks i need to know?

    Cheers
    1992 mi16 1.9 litre - it's a love hate realtionship.

    whatever you do NEVER tell anyone your car is reliable. doesn't matter how much wood you touch!

    previous cars: peugeot 306xt, peugeot 205si, renault 20, renault 12 - sedan and wagon, renault 25, alfa 155 twin spark

  2. #2
    1000+ Posts PeterT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by enthused!
    Hi all.

    I have a 1992 mi16 which is need of new rear brake pads. i have the haynes manual (somewhere) which should outline the procedure, but i just wanted to check from those who know a bit more than Mr Haynes:

    Any special instructions/things to watch out for when replacing the rear pads?

    are there any tricks i need to know?

    Cheers
    you'll need to make or buy the tool for winding in the pistons. They're on a thread.

    '92 205 Mi16
    '90 Mi16x4

  3. #3
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    The Poogoe has the handbrake on the back wheels

    How strange, the BX has it on the front wheels ... I would have thought they would use the global parts bin and use the same calipers On the BX I've found it was possible (but not easy) to wind them in with a large flat bladed screwdriver.

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleChevron
    The Poogoe has the handbrake on the back wheels

    How strange, the BX has it on the front wheels ... I would have thought they would use the global parts bin and use the same calipers On the BX I've found it was possible (but not easy) to wind them in with a large flat bladed screwdriver.

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    I used a screwdriver when I did this job on a 206 GTi.
    Graham

  5. #5
    Fellow Frogger! enthused!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterT
    you'll need to make or buy the tool for winding in the pistons. They're on a thread.
    ok attempt no.2 tomorrow (got supplied wrong pads - now have correct ones)..

    when you say "winding" in the pistons, do you actually mean like screw them in cos theyre on a screw thread?? I was just confused peter, i figured you meant the tool was on a "thread" on aussiefrogs!!

    i understand now - i think.. are both sides threaded the same way? are they just normal or reverse threaded??

    thanks for the input.

    1992 mi16 1.9 litre - it's a love hate realtionship.

    whatever you do NEVER tell anyone your car is reliable. doesn't matter how much wood you touch!

    previous cars: peugeot 306xt, peugeot 205si, renault 20, renault 12 - sedan and wagon, renault 25, alfa 155 twin spark

  6. #6
    1000+ Posts PeterT's Avatar
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    it would be logical that one side is a LH thread and the other side a RH thread, but I really can't remember.

    '92 205 Mi16
    '90 Mi16x4

  7. #7
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    On the '01 Golf i'm replacing them on for our neighbour it is clockwise (not digital). BTW the discs cost $55 ea and the set of pads cost $48 for this 1.6.

  8. #8
    1000+ Posts edgedweller's Avatar
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    Either way is OK. you only need 1/8 turn, threads disengage, push piston in, insert new pads, replace calipers, tighten everything, operate hand brake, it will self adjust. Side of flat file is OK.

    ed ge

  9. #9
    Fellow Frogger! KRISKARRERA's Avatar
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    Oh dear, I'll be attempting this soon, sounds like a right bitch to wind them in seeing as it's not clear which way the threading goes...
    405 MI16
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  10. #10
    Fellow Frogger! enthused!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRISKARRERA
    Oh dear, I'll be attempting this soon, sounds like a right bitch to wind them in seeing as it's not clear which way the threading goes...
    after much cursing and swearing i can tell you that they're both clockwise to wind them in.

    ...first one went easily - the second one took 150+ turns befre moving!

    does anyone know how this system works? the ratio of movement/turns is far from being constant.
    1992 mi16 1.9 litre - it's a love hate realtionship.

    whatever you do NEVER tell anyone your car is reliable. doesn't matter how much wood you touch!

    previous cars: peugeot 306xt, peugeot 205si, renault 20, renault 12 - sedan and wagon, renault 25, alfa 155 twin spark

  11. #11
    Fellow Frogger! Roland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by enthused!
    after much cursing and swearing i can tell you that they're both clockwise to wind them in.

    ...first one went easily - the second one took 150+ turns befre moving!

    does anyone know how this system works? the ratio of movement/turns is far from being constant.

    I just did all my pads on my '92 Mi16 last Wednesday.
    As you have noted - both pistons just screw in clockwise.
    This is not the same setup as with the 505 which ed ge has indicated in an earlier post. - but I found it was much easier to get the process started by clamping a G-Clamp to help the pistons go in. Now I guess I have to say be careful here but I too had the problem that nothing was happening after many turns. However, once I applied a small amout of pressure with the G-clamp then progress was quite quick. Also I first managed to get some silicone spary lubricant under the edge of the dust covers - that made them slip more easily as at one time it looked like they were about to tear as I turned!

    Once the new pads were in and the pedal was operated to position the pads against the disks I was pleaseantly surprised to find the handbrake worked perfectly. No adjustment needed.

    I also took the opportunity to bleed the system - all up about 2 hours work and as the disks were in excellent condition the new pads were bedded in in no time.

    Roland

  12. #12
    Fellow Frogger! pips's Avatar
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    For winding brake pistons back in. I've always used a G-clamp or a something like a massive set of pliers. You know the adjustable ones that you can increase the size of the jaws?

    Of course, I've always used a block of wood between it and the calliper to avoid scratching and/or any other damage.

    Keep an eye on your fluid reservoir. If this is already full, you might start pushing fluid through, back into the tank, and possibly spilling it over the body of the car, as well as other components in the area.

    Also, check the dust boots on the brake pistons. If these have cracks and are broken, they would have let dust in. Pushing the piston back in now would possibly cause a leak by damaging the seal. I'm not sure if they sell seal kits of you'd have to buy a whole new calliper. We use to clean the pistons with Brake Clean (you can get spray cans of it from Super Cheap) and a fine piece of sandpaper. I'm talking very fine. So it turns the brake dust and the brake clean into a paste. Then just spray more brake clean over it to wash it all away. DING! shiny new pistons, and saved seals.

    pipsqeek
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  13. #13
    Member mbyok's Avatar
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    Also, it may be worthwhile to check the condition of the rear brake hoses - (two each side). The ones on our Mi (Series 1.5) were almost completely stuffed and needed replacement.

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