505 SLi & STI: what I've been up to
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  1. #1
    Member blizzardboy's Avatar
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    Default 505 SLi & STI: what I've been up to

    FWIW:

    I really enjoy this website, although I spend way too much time wading through the threads!

    I own and self-manage a 1984 505 STI and a 1986 505 SLi wagon. The STI has books from the new; the SLi has none!

    Yesterday I bit the bullet and cleaned up the throttle body, air flow sensor and oil bath filter on my SLi. What a difference this has made. I removed a lot of build up from around the butterfly valve and sensor plate, flushed out the vacuum/air ports on the throttle body, and replaced the filter oil. I had to slow down the idle speed a couple of turns on restart - just shows how much restriction to air flow there is in the throttle body when dirty.

    I also pulled out my starter motor and had it reconditioned (new bushes and drive).

    The car starts beautifully and runs well. I took it for a run out on the freeway last night - it was purring and there is noticeably more power following the clean up. I am hoping to see some improvement in fuel economy (currently 11.5l/100km around town running on BP Ultimate) but I won't hold my breath on that one.

    I also cleaned up/re-crimped some of the connections in the big black plug on the main power line (located near the battery). This has remedied the voltage problems I was having. Under large current loads (A/C fan on, brake lights on, indicators on, radio on, blower fan on) there was insufficient voltage reaching the fuse board due to the voltage drop at the plug (indicators were slow, windows wouldn't open, climate control relay would click in time with the indicators).

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    I have done a fair bit of work on the SLi now: front and rear sway bar links, engine mounts, radiator recore, restored thermoclutch operation, thermoswitch replaced, AFM/throttle body/oil bath service, fuel tank leak fix, head light adjusters, power windows service, fixed odometer, reco starter, different wiring issues, new tie rod end, steering flector replaced, cold start injector replaced, brake line flush, etc. I think I might have bought a lemon!? Anyhow, all is well now.

    I am now itching to clean up the air flow meter and throttle body on the STI.
    I recently replaced the cam belt and water pump on the STI. I will replace all three belts soon. Last weekend I fixed up my reversing light by replacing the inhibitor switch with a second hand one from U-Pull-It. Next job on the STI is to replace the steering rack with a second hand one I bought from U-Pull-It and flush the brake lines. BTW, I fixed up the spring in the gear selector handle using the spring steel from off a set of Corolla points that were lying around. Bugger of a job to get to the broken spring but most rewarding once fixed!

    I also removed a starter motor from an STI at U-Pull-It. Took me less than half an hour with only a 13mm socket and ratchet. Wasn't too difficult I thought. Removing/replacing the SLi starter motor was slightly more fiddly but not too bad: I used a 13-mm spanner (ratchet ring spanner would have been ideal, firewall insulation already removed previously) for the top bolt while working from above and a 13mm socket, long and short extensions and a flex bar for the bottom bolt while working from below. I removed the starter from below on the STI and from above on the SLi (unplug cold start injector wiring and remove auxillary air valve rear hose.)

    I am not sure if this contribution will interest anyone but I just had to tell someone who might be able to relate! (my wife is supportive but I think she would like me to be inside a little more - hopefully I have broken the back of the work now).

  2. #2
    Gone Fishin' Ray Bell's Avatar
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    Of course it's of interest!

    Better go wash your hands before you spend any more time at the keyboard, though...

  3. #3
    Fellow Frogger! 604 tragic's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blizzardboy
    FWIW:

    I really enjoy this website, although I spend way too much time wading through the threads!

    I own and self-manage a 1984 505 STI and a 1986 505 SLi wagon. The STI has books from the new; the SLi has none!
    I am now itching to clean up the air flow meter and throttle body on the STI.
    I recently replaced the cam belt and water pump on the STI. I will replace all three belts soon. Last weekend I fixed up my reversing light by replacing the inhibitor switch with a second hand one from U-Pull-It. Next job on the STI is to replace the steering rack with a second hand one I bought from U-Pull-It and flush the brake lines.

    I also removed a starter motor from an STI at U-Pull-It. Took me less than half an hour with only a 13mm socket and ratchet. Wasn't too difficult I thought. Removing/replacing the SLi starter motor was slightly more fiddly but not too bad: I used a 13-mm spanner (ratchet ring spanner would have been ideal, firewall insulation already removed previously) for the top bolt while working from above and a 13mm socket, long and short extensions and a flex bar for the bottom bolt while working from below. I removed the starter from below on the STI and from above on the SLi (unplug cold start injector wiring and remove auxillary air valve rear hose.)

    I am not sure if this contribution will interest anyone but I just had to tell someone who might be able to relate! (my wife is supportive but I think she would like me to be inside a little more - hopefully I have broken the back of the work now).
    Yes - i am interested too, as I want to fix up the air flow meter and throttle body on our STI. I have done some work on it & its not idling right & I suspect these. Please keep us posted.

    Good work on the starter motors. They are a tight fit. They should make removing & refitting 505 STI starters an olympic event!! It woiuld be more interesting than most other events.

    Funny thing about the SLI's as my mate has had nearly exactky the same things fixed on his too - they must be all lemons!!! But he still loves his even though the fuel pump just died.
    So many projects - so little time.

  4. #4
    Member blizzardboy's Avatar
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    Default SLI tuned

    I bought an automotive multimeter from Dick Smiths last night (they're on special at the moment). Great to be able to accurately set the idle speed and watch the revs while tuning. I reset the timing on the SLi this morning as it was about 2 degrees advanced. Is running quite smoothly now.

    Its good to see that a little bit of time and TLC has brought significant improvement to the SLi wagon. I think I'm hooked on these Peugeot 505s!!!

  5. #5
    Tadpole stephenlansell's Avatar
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    Icon14

    Quote Originally Posted by blizzardboy
    Its good to see that a little bit of time and TLC has brought significant improvement to the SLi wagon. I think I'm hooked on these Peugeot 505s!!!
    I'm the mate of 604 Tragic who has the SLi wagon and has had done a heap of work on it (by some expensive and less than competent Peugeot mechanics!!!) and have now done a heap of work on it myself (nothing beats genuine TLC) and now finally it is starting and running better than when I bought it 10 years ago (with 150,000 kms on the clock). Despite all the minor annoying problems that I have had with it, I still love it and can't see myself with anything else. It has never used a drop of oil or water and is coming up to 300,000 kms. Carn the SLi's!
    86 505 SLi Wagon
    82 505 Sedan

  6. #6
    Member blizzardboy's Avatar
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    Default STI air flow meter clean

    I took on the STI air flow meter (AFM) and throttle body on Friday night. Was really dirty so I am glad to have done the job.

    Here's a summary of the job:

    *removed AFM plastic manifold and large rubber air hose to throttle body
    *undid two large banjo bolts on fuel distributor (supply and return). TAKE CARE to stop AFM/fuel distributor from twisting as you undo the banjo bolts or the rubber isolation mounts might shear away
    *undid 10mm bolts (6 or 7 of them) holding down AFM plate
    *raised AFM plate and suspended at angle by tying cord through two firewall-side bolt holes on AFM and then to top of bonnet (I decided not to remove the AFM from the vehicle)
    *packed underneath of AFM with cloth/paper towel and then cleaned up AFM with carby cleaner (Nulon). I didn't spray anywhere near the plunger. Flow sensor moves much better now.
    *smeared Loctite MAXX blue gasket maker on either side of paper gasket and then bolted down AFM
    *REPLACED copper gaskets on banjo joints (you could have a flame thrower under your bonnet if you don't; 65+psi fuel pressure!; difficult to find these gaskets on a Saturday morning: I tracked them down at Petro-Ject, a Bosch agent). TAKE CARE to stop AFM/fuel distributor from twisting as you tighten the banjo bolts or the rubber isolation mounts might shear away.
    *removed throttle body (a bit awkward) and cleaned with carby cleaner - a lot of build up. Flushed out vacuum ports. Maybe the old exhaust gas recycler used to cause a lot of build up in the throttle body/plenum chamber?
    *removed the plenum chamber to degrease and scrub it (jif, 'Shiner' fine steel wool, green dish scrub) - a lot of build up here too
    *renewed old vacuum lines with new ones, replaced faulty vacuum advance one-way valve with second hand one, found vacuum diaphragm in decommissioned exhaust gas recycler valve (firewall side of throttle body) to be leaky so removed vacuum line to switch on thermostat body on plugged port. Plastic kick-down fitting was broken (had been glued) so I replaced with a U-Pull-It spare.
    *replaced plenum chamber after smearing both sides of o-rings with MAXX gasket maker (I would have prefered to renew these o-rings but they are flat section and I didn't feel like tracking down replacements).
    *installed throttle body after smearing o-ring with MAXX, re-installed all hoses and fittings, and then started car.
    *idle was around 1300 rpm and not able to be reduced down to below 950 rpm with idle adjust (located under plenum chamber). Using tacho on automotive multimeter reset butterfly rest position by turning grub screw in throttle body and resest microswitch position (just clicks open circuit as throttle arm comes to rest position). As the throttle body accumulated gunk over the years people must have adjusted the butterfly valve position to compensate.
    *road test shows improved power and response - very satisfying . Must be breathing/operating better. I'll be interested to see if there is an improvement in fuel economy.

    In hindsight I probably could have left the throttle body in the car and just removed the plenum chamber. However, it was nice to have the throttle body out of the car to clean. I reckon the AFM/throttle body on the SLi was much easier to service than on the STI.

    I should probably now go and have the exhaust gas composition analysed/adjusted. Has anyone found the mixture ratio needing adjustment having performed a similar cleanup of the AFM/throttle body?

    Cheers,

    Todd

  7. #7
    Member blizzardboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stephenlansell
    ...have now done a heap of work on it myself (nothing beats genuine TLC) and now finally it is starting and running better than when I bought it 10 years ago (with 150,000 kms on the clock). Despite all the minor annoying problems that I have had with it, I still love it and can't see myself with anything else. It has never used a drop of oil or water and is coming up to 300,000 kms. Carn the SLi's!
    I reckon the SLi is great too! I don't think they deserve any bad press.

    By the way, having bought the SLi to tip top shape I took the kids for a drive on Sunday only to find myself running on three cylinders! I was not happy . I had visions of expensive repairs. I turned for home, pulled out the kids and popped the bonnet. I tracked down a high-tension arcing noise from cylinder #2 spark well. Turns out that a small leak had started in the hose with bleed screw running to the manifold that is mounted on top of the rocker cover. Coolant was running down to #2 spark plug and shorting out the spark! I fixed up the hose and problem was solved. She's purring again.
    1986 505 SLi wagon (XN6; 3HP22; silver)
    1984 505 STI sedan (ZDJK; 3HP22; silver light blue)

  8. #8
    Fellow Frogger! 604 tragic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blizzardboy
    I took on the STI air flow meter (AFM) and throttle body on Friday night. Was really dirty so I am glad to have done the job.

    Here's a summary of the job:
    Cheers,
    Todd
    Phew - what a thorough job. Well done!
    I am going to reread your post a few times so I can be right across this.
    On the weekend I had a quick look at the STI which is still idling at about 1100RPM (just a guess as tacho kaput).
    I havent played with the grub screw as its hard to turn (LockTight?) and there is NO effect when turning the idle adjust fully in or out - so I would like to find the reason for this first & then adjust the grub screw if needed.

    Odd thing is you can rev the motor and then when throttle returns to rest position, the idle goes way down to (say) 600RPM - but only momentarily - and then it speeds up to 1000+
    I have checked all hoses for leaks & think they are OK - but perhaps the brake booster is taking too much vacuum (or perhaps the vacuum take off into the cabin for heater controls??).

    I noticed that on one of the 2 green emmission switch/thermostat units had a loose top & I can rotate the top a bit. As I am not sure what they do & how they work - so I left as is.

    Perhaps I should plug each hoses in turn & see if I can isolate problem. But thanks for the excellent advice.
    So many projects - so little time.

  9. #9
    Member blizzardboy's Avatar
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    Default STI injector mini service

    Quote Originally Posted by 604 tragic
    I havent played with the grub screw as its hard to turn (LockTight?) and there is NO effect when turning the idle adjust fully in or out - so I would like to find the reason for this first & then adjust the grub screw if needed.
    I wouldn't touch the grub screw (primary idle adjustment) if its in the original position - if you service/check all the other parts (air flow sensor, throttle body, injectors, vacuum hoses) you may find that the original setting is OK.

    Yesterday I put new o-rings on my injectors (Bosch part, purchased from Petro-Ject) and injector housings (Peugeot part, I used Parker #114 viton for replacement: 3/32" section, 5/8" ID). I used Parker o-ring lubricant for all disassembly/assembly. I also cleaned up the injector housings and o-ring mating surfaces on the inlet manifold. My o-rings (originals?) were hard and brittle. I needed to break the o-rings on the injector housings (carefully with a scribe) in order to remove them. The o-rings on the injectors were out of round and hardened.

    This has made an obvious difference to the running of the engine. As all the literature indicates, the Bosch K-Jetronic system needs good vacuum to operate properly. It makes sense to renew these o-rings as a priority because the vacuum is generated by the pistons sucking through the inlet valves and the injectors housings are located right near the inlet valves, if there is a leak here then the level of vacuum generated at the plenum chamber/air flow sensor will be compromised.

    I also renewed the short hose links between the injector housings and the small manifold mounted above. I also used Parker o-ring lubricant (sticky and kind to rubber) on the sealing surfaces between the large rubber hose and the air flow sensor and the throttle body.

    The STI now feels more responsive and has more power - it now actually takes off when I put my foot down! The idle is smoother - sitting nicely around 940 rpm - and starting is instantaneous. The grub screw is in the original factory set position and the secondary idle adjust is open less than a couple of turns. I am hoping for an improvement in fuel economy but won't hold my breath!

    Bon chance!
    Last edited by blizzardboy; 14th April 2005 at 05:55 PM.
    1986 505 SLi wagon (XN6; 3HP22; silver)
    1984 505 STI sedan (ZDJK; 3HP22; silver light blue)

  10. #10
    Member blizzardboy's Avatar
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    Default SLi fixed, STI fixes

    I have just finished putting a new 3HP22 into my SLi wagon. Was a big job really. The hardest parts were managing the rear axle, manouvering the transmission and refitting the engine mount. To support the transmission I used a scissors platform jack (like a large lab jack) that I picked up at a garage sale - very handy as it has castors. I used stumps (from a palm I recently cut down) and MDF offcuts to support the axle during different stages of the job, and two trolley jacks: one under the diff and the other under the torque tube. I rigged up a truckie's knot to winch the axle back and forth.

    I ended up putting the speedo drive gear out of an STI (28 teeth) into the box as my old one (29 teeth) was chipped and worn. Speedo now reads overspeed.

    Replaced the central locking switch in the drivers door (with secondhand one out of a series I STI), replaced the fuel pump connector behind the glovebox (corroded), and fixed up the knee-guard cowling under the steering wheel (someone had wedged over-sized screws into the holes in the past).

    Drives like a new one.

    Have posted this fix for 505 indicators elsewhere but I will repeat here: I fixed the indicators in my STI (flasher can buzzing and not blinking) by tracing the fault back to the hazard light switch. Power to the flasher can is routed through the hazard light switch (see Haynes). I opened up the hazard switch, cleaned the contacts and now the indicators flash strongly. This is the reason why switching the hazard lights on sometimes starts up failing indicators as a better contact is made.

    I also put a secondhand prepump in the STI as the old one had failed (evident by noisy main fuel pump; $350 for new one ). Pumps are purring now. In combination with a new air filter, purflux oil filter (for old ryco) and semi-synth 15W-50 oil, the car is running noticeably better.
    1986 505 SLi wagon (XN6; 3HP22; silver)
    1984 505 STI sedan (ZDJK; 3HP22; silver light blue)

  11. #11
    Fellow Frogger! 604 tragic's Avatar
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    Icon5 STI prepump

    Quote Originally Posted by blizzardboy
    I also put a secondhand prepump in the STI as the old one had failed (evident by noisy main fuel pump; $350 for new one ). Pumps are purring now. In combination with a new air filter, purflux oil filter (for old ryco) and semi-synth 15W-50 oil, the car is running noticeably better.
    Thanks for the update Blizzardboy - your posts are always very very interesting to me!

    I am presently fixing up another STI that I bought with a broken cam belt.
    It has what looks like a new main petrol pump but it runs noisly compared with our other STIs, so I presume it is a stuffed prepump???

    Can you tell me how you went about replacing it? Was it a tank out job?

    Any other tips and/or traps.

    PS: did you have to pay much for a prepump - Pick-a-part??
    So many projects - so little time.

  12. #12
    Member blizzardboy's Avatar
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    Default prepump replacement

    Quote Originally Posted by 604 tragic
    It has what looks like a new main petrol pump but it runs noisly compared with our other STIs, so I presume it is a stuffed prepump???

    Can you tell me how you went about replacing it? Was it a tank out job?

    Any other tips and/or traps.

    PS: did you have to pay much for a prepump - Pick-a-part??
    I bought the pre-pump from U-Pullit (was once Pick-a-part) for next to nothing - was a while ago, maybe $20. Main fuel pump wtih accumulator cost me around $40 I think.

    Bit of a bugger to replace. I do it without removing the fuel tank. I just lower the fuel tank down by loosening off the front nylock nut until it is just holding on - I place a support under the tank just in case the nut comes off. This gives me enough space so I can then work through the access holes in the boot. My arms and hands are not that big so I can contort myself around to push/pull the fuel hoses by hand.

    Check (with a small mirror for e.g.) to see if the supply line has no cracks on the way to the main pump - particularly at the corner where it bends down through the body work.

    Before you go pulling the old prepump out do some checks on it. With the car running pull apart the electrical supply and listen for the prepump sound to stop. Check that 12V is being supplied to connector and also check the ground. With my replacement prepump in hand I also VERY BRIEFLY plugged into the electrical supply to see if it would run (some people will tell you that these pumps will blow up if turned on at all without being immersed - but I didn't have any problem, just listen for it to spin up and then disconnect immediately.)

    Remove all dust and buildup around the top of the prepump before attempting to undo the fasterner (bung?). Compressed air is good for this. I made up a tool to crack open the plastic bung (I wanted to avoid breaking off the plastic lugs; looks like half of a turret on a castle) and then worked it the rest of the way with two flat blade screwdrivers crossed over. I have seen these lugs broken off on wrecked cars - take care because the plastic is old and brittle by now.

    The factory hose clamps can be unclipped by prying with a flat blade screwdriver. I replace them with worm-drive hose clamps.

    I chose to replace the main fuel pump/accumulator before I replaced the prepump as this is an easier job. When this made no difference I then proceeded to fault find/replace the prepump.
    1986 505 SLi wagon (XN6; 3HP22; silver)
    1984 505 STI sedan (ZDJK; 3HP22; silver light blue)

  13. #13
    Member blizzardboy's Avatar
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    Default STI brake booster

    I replaced metric alloys with 5.5" steels on Saturday. While I had the STI up on stands I flushed the brake lines (full credit to my wife for a perfect pedal pumping performance). On starting the car, a loud hissing noise could be heard from below behind the brake pedal.

    Evidently the brake booster diaphragm had ruptured. On Sunday I replaced the booster unit. Pretty straight forward job really. Removing the plastic manifold from on top of the air flow sensor gave me space, as did gently bending aside the brake lines and wiring. I removed the master cylinder before pulling the booster unit out. The spring clip holding the pin on the brake pedal was removed by holding my finger on one side and pushing the other side with a screw driver. The booster needs to be wriggled around to just the right spot for removal. I found it easier to put the replacement one back in. Brakes are great now.

    Added bonus was that I can now control idle speed properly. I have only owned this STI for a few months; Idle speed was around 980 rpm and couldn't be reduced with the idle adjust screw. Obviously the booster diaphragm was partially ruptured when I bought the car - I had noticed a quiet hissing noise before but ignored it - hence the extra air into the plenum chamber. After replacing the brake booster the engine was initially idling around 700 rpm!
    Last edited by blizzardboy; 29th November 2005 at 10:55 AM.
    1986 505 SLi wagon (XN6; 3HP22; silver)
    1984 505 STI sedan (ZDJK; 3HP22; silver light blue)

  14. #14
    Fellow Frogger! 604 tragic's Avatar
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    Icon14

    Quote Originally Posted by blizzardboy
    On starting the car, a loud hissing noise could be heard from below behind the brake pedal.

    Evidently the brake booster diaphragm had ruptured.

    The booster needs to be wriggled around to just the right spot for removal. I found it easier to put the replacement one back in. Brakes are great now.

    Added bonus was that I can now control idle speed properly. I have only owned this STI for a few months; Idle speed was around 980 rpm and couldn't be reduced with the idle adjust screw. Obviously the booster diaphragm was partially ruptured when I bought the car - I had noticed a quiet hissing noise before but ignored it - hence the extra air into the plenum chamber. After replacing the brake booster the engine was initially idling around 700 rpm!
    AAAHA!!!
    Have you solved 2 STI mysteries in one go??

    Do the brakes 'bite' now? Our 505 has a dead feel when you push the pedal
    & doesnt seem to stop as well as I remember it.

    I must start listening for a leak, (where is the best place for this?)

    And the luxury of having an 'idle' back whooho!!!

    I suppose I could test this by plugging up the booster hose & seeing if the idle comes back - would this work??

    Thanks again & keep solving those STI puzzles.
    So many projects - so little time.

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    Member blizzardboy's Avatar
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    Default brake booster vacuum line

    604 Tragic,

    Definitely blocking off the booster vacuum hose will tell you if there is an air leak from inside the booster unit. Its a bit fiddly removing the hose from the booster, so I would remove it from the plenum chamber and then work out a way to block up that hole, e.g put another hose on the plenum chamber fitting and block its end up.

    With the car running, my hissing noise could be heard by placing an ear close to where the booster unit connects to brake pedal (inside the car, bit of contortion required). Maybe you could get a hose and place one end on your ear and the other near the potential source of hissing.

    I wouldn't say my brakes bite now. They do pull the car up reasonably quickly and smoothly, however, and with little effort from my foot (that's the booster working).

    There is one small concern I have following reading the Haynes manual last night. Haynes says that the brake compensator piston should be held down with a spacer during bleeding on sedans. I didn't do that (I just followed the procedure I used to bleed the wagon - different compensator setup.) I am yet to understand what the implication of this is - maybe some air could still be in the system? Maybe I could have damaged something?

    I found this thread: 505 rear brake compensator
    So I figure no damage, just poor bleeding pressure to the rear, and high to the front (I do seem to recall the bleed line having higher pressure in it at the front.)

    By the way, I have bought myself a s/hand genuine Peugeot Tool chest for K-Jetronic fuel injection testing (couldn't help myself). I enjoy learning about the fuel injection setup on these cars.
    Last edited by blizzardboy; 30th November 2005 at 12:53 PM.
    1986 505 SLi wagon (XN6; 3HP22; silver)
    1984 505 STI sedan (ZDJK; 3HP22; silver light blue)

  16. #16
    Fellow Frogger! 604 tragic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blizzardboy
    604 Tragic,

    Definitely blocking off the booster vacuum hose will tell you if there is an air leak from inside the booster unit. Its a bit fiddly removing the hose from the booster, so I would remove it from the plenum chamber and then work out a way to block up that hole, e.g put another hose on the plenum chamber fitting and block its end up.

    ......


    I wouldn't say my brakes bite now. They do pull the car up reasonably quickly and smoothly, however, and with little effort from my foot (that's the booster working).

    There is one small concern I have following reading the Haynes manual last night. Haynes says that the brake compensator piston should be held down with a spacer during bleeding on sedans. I didn't do that (I just followed the procedure I used to bleed the wagon - different compensator setup.) I am yet to understand what the implication of this is - maybe some air could still be in the system? Maybe I could have damaged something?

    .....

    By the way, I have bought myself a s/hand genuine Peugeot Tool chest for K-Jetronic fuel injection testing (couldn't help myself). I enjoy learning about the fuel injection setup on these cars.
    Good tip - I will try listening at the brake pedal end. I actually have a mechanic's stephascope (sp?) which has a long probe & should do the job nicely.
    But I will try blocking off the booster hose outlet first to see what result I get.

    With the rear brakes, I just jack the car under the suspension wishbones ( so that they are not dropped down) and bleed the rear brakes with engine running to get the assistance of the booster. This should get a big spurt, like the front cylinders, and get any air out. I agree, they are a pain to bleed.

    Good luck with your new KJet toys/tools. Somewhere here I have a copy of the official 505 STI KJet mechanic's training notes (from when they were new) with different coloured flow diagrams and expected pressures and ohm readings for the electrical sensors. You may want a copy if I can dig it up. I know a little bit about this stuff from my old Lucas PI days (on Triumphs). The basics are to have good petrol pressure throughout the system and good intake manifold vacuum. Good clean injectors are a help too!!
    So many projects - so little time.

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    Member blizzardboy's Avatar
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    Default would love a copy!

    Hi there 604 Tragic,

    I would love a copy of the STI K-Jetronic notes - thank you. Shall I PM you my postal address?

    Cheers
    1986 505 SLi wagon (XN6; 3HP22; silver)
    1984 505 STI sedan (ZDJK; 3HP22; silver light blue)

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    Member blizzardboy's Avatar
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    Default sump gasket and clean oil

    Before taking my SLi wagon to Tasmania last week I dropped off the lower sump and replaced the cork gasket. After cleaning out the sludge that had accumulated down there I found the oil to remain very clean after nearly 1800 km of driving. If it hasn't been done in a while and your oil goes black quickly, I would recommend removing/cleaning the lower sump and replacing the gasket as it is not a hard job. I was surprised at how much effort someone had previously put into smearing silicone around the old gasket to remove leaks when a new gasket would have worked wonders. After changing the timing chain (which included a clean up of the oil sealing mechanism) and replacing the lower sump gasket I now have no oil leaks.

    During the trip, I found slightly better fuel economy with BP Ultimate (98 RON) as opposed to BP Premium (95 RON) (I couldn't buy Ultimate in Horsham, Tasmania or Melbourne). The best return was 29.8 mpg (9.4 l/100 km) over a 450 km leg at 100 km/h highway speed.

    The XN6 has a beautiful note when cruising along at about 3800 rpm - I liken it to the hum of a small aircraft engine.
    1986 505 SLi wagon (XN6; 3HP22; silver)
    1984 505 STI sedan (ZDJK; 3HP22; silver light blue)

  19. #19
    Member blizzardboy's Avatar
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    Default keys cut and central locking theory

    Following a theft, I was without keys for one of my 505 STIs. The steering lock was on.

    Following advice received in this forum, I removed the steering column, door lock and boot lock - all very straight forward to do. I took them down to my local locksmith who cut keys for all at a cost of $135. All new keys work perfectly.

    As far as my 505 central locking theory goes: Both my 505s recently had the same problem in which the central locking failed with the symptom that the key would lift the lock mechanism partially but the solenoid would not respond - making it impossible to open the door. I am sure that both switches are fine (just a little old), its just that when I locked the car prior to the problem occuring maybe I didn't hold the key in the close position long enough to allow the switch mechanism to fully close, leaving the switch in limbo. The solenoid shuts but the switch sensing mechanism goes wobbly. Fixing requires pulling the door apart and manually pulling/pushing (I can't remember which one) the switch into position to 'reset' it. So I am now testing my theory by keeping the key in the close position a little longer to fully allow the switch and solenoid to take up their closed position. Hey, its just my theory.

    For anyone who is interested, the central locking controller senses the position of the door lock according to which of two circuits is grounded in the driver's side switch (integral to the solenoid/actuator).

    Keep on having fun with your 505.
    1986 505 SLi wagon (XN6; 3HP22; silver)
    1984 505 STI sedan (ZDJK; 3HP22; silver light blue)

  20. #20
    Fellow Frogger! John505's Avatar
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    Default

    Blizzardboy,
    Like you I own a 1986 auto SLi wagon, so I always find your posts interesting. I have had the problem of the central locking "jaming up" so that you could not unlock the driver's door & had to pull the door trim off from inside & then manually push the solenoid lever down to reset. After this happened three times I got really irritated as I had tried oiling the lock mechanism, spraying the solenoid to remove dirt build up etc. By total chance I found if I left the smaller of the two electrical connectors to the solenoid unplugged, everything worked fine! This was after replacing the controller etc. Since then (a few months ago) I have not had the system jam up.
    On another tack, have you found this "wire 153" in the engine bay that when connected to a dwell meter allows you to properly set the idle mixture in the SLi wagon? I have tried, but I so far cannot get anywhere with this. I have a set of the Peugeot Technical notes of the XN6 K-Jetronic "Checks & Adjustments, Repairs & Tests", & it is mentioned in this as an alternative to the use of a "Closed Loop" tester.
    Thanks in advance
    John505

  21. #21
    Member blizzardboy's Avatar
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    Default Dwell meter and close loop

    Hi there John,

    Yes I do have this wire and use it with my dwell meter to set the mixture. By memory the plug is located on the RHS wheel arch, not too far from the coil. Just a single male spade fitting. The other lead of your meter goes to a good ground.

    I was lucky to have good, brisk oscillation from the Lambda sensor when the ECU went into closed loop. I also observed open loop on start up.

    I too have the Peugeot XN6 injection manual, be stuffed without it!

    As far as your central locking fix goes, what you have done is disenable the solenoid on the drivers side door. The two pin (smaller) plug is the +/-12V supply to the solenoid and the three pin connector is the switch (one is ground, one shorted to the ground or open circuit, and the other either open circuit or ground) which tells the controller the position of the door lock. So you are manually opening/closing the drivers door and using the switch to tell the central locking controller to operate the other three door locks.

    As an aside, my STI definitely runs better (economy/performance) on 95RON (BP Premium) than it does on 98RON (BP Ultimate) with timing set to spec.

    All the best,

    Todd
    Last edited by blizzardboy; 1st March 2006 at 01:16 PM.
    1986 505 SLi wagon (XN6; 3HP22; silver)
    1984 505 STI sedan (ZDJK; 3HP22; silver light blue)

  22. #22
    Member blizzardboy's Avatar
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    Default Wagon rear interior light

    Fixed the rear interior light in my wagon on the weekend.

    The light is turned on by a tilt switch mounted in the RHS of the tailgate. The switch is a copper cylinder with three ball bearings inside. I opened the switch by carefully grinding away the copper lip that holds the plastic insulator in place. With fine emery I cleaned up the ball-bearings (two steel and a smaller bronze I think) and used a needle file to clean out the inside of the copper barrel - its oxide that's stops the conduction. Epoxy resin to remount the pin and works like a new one. Very easy fix.

    Happy Pugging.
    1986 505 SLi wagon (XN6; 3HP22; silver)
    1984 505 STI sedan (ZDJK; 3HP22; silver light blue)

  23. #23
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    Default

    "by total chance I found if I left the smaller of the two electrical connectors to the solenoid unplugged, everything worked fine! This was after replacing the controller etc. Since then (a few months ago) I have not had the system jam up."


    I also discovered this 'fix' about four years ago. Yes it is 'manually activating' solonoid on one direction, which in turn still activates the other doors. Eventually, you may find that it buggers up totally (ie does work in bother directions), and you will need to replace with another actuator (available from the wreckers).

    Cheers,

    Scott

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