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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! Bluey's Avatar
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    Default Production Power

    September’s edition of “Racecar Engineering” magazine includes an article on the new (2001) Ford 2L 4 cylinder engine applied to racing. The engine tuner is the British based Mountune Racing, who have experience in building Ford WRC engines and built engines for Peugeot Sport in 1998 for the 406 Super Tourers.
    I’ve brought this to light as Froggers with XU9s, XU10s, EW10s and F4Rs can get an indication of what is needed to achieve certain naturally aspirated power levels and power versus cost.

    Ford Duratec HE (as standard in Mondeo)
    All alloy 2L DOHC 16V
    145bhp @ 6000rpm & 190Nm @ 4800rpm
    87.5mm bore
    83.1mm stroke
    35.5mm inlet valves
    29.9mm exhaust valves
    Cast iron crankshaft
    Sintered forged steel conrods
    Short skirt aluminium alloy pistons w/ 10.8:1 comp. ratio
    Bucket over shim valve actuation
    Chain driven camshafts
    92kg

    All of the tuning levels maintain the use of the following parts as well as those listed for each power output:
    *Standard crankshaft
    *Aftermarket ECU including sensors
    *Throttle bodies
    *Uprated injectors
    *Lightweight flywheel to take 8.5” clutch
    *Extractors

    196bhp @ 7000rpm & 210Nm
    *Standard cylinder head casting, standard camshafts, standard conrods, standard pistons.
    Cost: AU$5700 in kit form (parts only)

    220bhp @ 7500rpm & 226Nm
    *Standard head casting, standard conrods, standard pistons.
    *Uprated camshafts, adjustable cam gears, heavy duty valve springs and retainers.
    Cost: AU$7200 in kit form (parts only)

    250bhp @ 8000rpm & 244Nm
    *Forged pistons and conrods.
    *Uprated camshafts, adjustable cam gears, heavy duty valve springs and retainers.
    *Cylinder head porting
    Cost: No cost given (Add roughly $1500 for pistons and $1500 for rods)

    270bhp @ 8500rpm & 245Nm
    *Forged pistons and conrods.
    *Uprated camshafts, adjustable cam gears, heavy duty valve springs and retainers.
    *Cylinder head porting
    Cost: No cost given (Add roughly $1500 for pistons and $1500 for rods)

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  2. #2
    1000+ Posts brenno's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks for posting that Bluey.

    Wow, 245nm is waaaay up there!

  3. #3
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default

    yeah but look - 220 BHP from the standard head = wow, i wish i had a spare $7000.

    Thanx for the info

  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger! Bluey's Avatar
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    Default ECUs

    I know this isn’t directly French performance related but it’s directed at those who don’t believe that any more power can be extracted from a chip or piggyback ECU upgrade on a RSC or 180. I’m not saying that because there are gains found in the engine in the article that it is wrote and will definitely apply to similar French engines but it gives an indication of what is more than likely possible.
    Like my previous post I’ve included price as an indication of what to expect.

    “Racecar Engineering” Vol 14 No. 12 December 2004 has another article on an engine similar to the EW10J4 and F4R (2 litre, DOHC 16V, VVT and Power>170bhp). This time it’s about power gains that can be made from the already high powered 2L engine found in Honda type R’s using a Canadian fully remappable Hondata ECU based on the factory Honda ECU. The end result shows increases in torque and power throughout the entire rev range. The standard Honda ECU is being used therefore there is no loss of warranty, no loss of emissions compliance, no loss of fuel economy or factory cold startup. Cost is AUD$1820.

    The factory ECU has an additional PC board with USB connection soldered in and Windows based PC software is used to remap. It sits in the standard ECU position in the car and plugs straight into the factory loom.
    The ECU can: reprogram fuel ,ignition, cam angle settings, VTEC mapping including operation at different engine speeds, rev limiter adjustment, switch between open and closed loop mapping working with the factory Lambda sensor, accommodate larger injectors, data-logging of 39 major sensors, control forced induction and nitrous oxide applications. The tuner has a choice of 8 different base maps to start tuning.
    Changing the variable valve timing window is claimed to, “allow for good driveability and economy during light running as well as offering optimal power at wide throttle openings, where as the standard ECU is tuned purely for economy.”

    CPL Racing in the UK took a stock Civic type R with 72500kms and fitted the Hondata ECU with the aim of making the power delivery smooth, (i.e. get rid of Honda’s typical lack of mid-range torque and peaky power delivery). They used 98.6 RON Shell Optimax and a Dyno Dynamics rolling dyno. CPL adjusted the cam timing, fuel map, ignition map, variable valve timing and rev limit.
    95 Dyno runs were conducted to get the final result. CPL reckoned that Honda’s factory claim of 197bhp was a crock because they only got 153bhp at the wheels and said 180bhp was a more realistic crank hp figure.
    Power improvements: 8bhp @ 3000rpm, 17bhp @ 5700rpm, 40bhp @ 6000rpm (massive hole in factory mapping led to this huge gain), and 14bhp @ 7600rpm where a peak of 167bhp at wheels (197 bhp @ crank) was recorded.
    Torque improvements: 13Nm @ 3000rpm and 19 Nm @ a, 660rpm lower than factory, 6000rpm where peak torque was recorded @ 198Nm.

    Power curve is smooth and has no dips till after 7600rpm. Power and torque are increased throughout the whole rev range (1850-8600rpm).
    Cost: ECU = AUD$1820 plus mapping costs.
    Stock ECU therefore no loss of warranty, loss of emissions compliance, loss of fuel economy.

  5. #5
    Gone Fishin' Ray Bell's Avatar
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    Exactly what are 'sintered forged steel rods'?

  6. #6
    Gone Fishin' Ray Bell's Avatar
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    Well... not really... have a read and see what I mean...

    Shaping Methods
    Three main methods are using for production of the sintered shapes from the powders

    1. Pressureless Forming
    2. Cold Pressing
    3. Hot Pressing

    Pressureless Forming
    When highly porous components are required, they can be produced by loose sintering. The powder is poured or vibrated into a mould, which is heated to the sintering temperature. The sintered parts shrink on cooling and shapes are only processed which can be removed from the mould on completion of the process.

    Other methods of pressureless forming include slip and slurry casting.

    Cold Pressing
    The powder is formed into the required shape by mechanical or hydraulic pressure. The pressures are fairly low from about 80 N. mm-2 for soft copper based alloys to 80N.mm-2 for steels. The pressures used are sufficient to produce cold welding of the powder granules. The process imparts sufficient strength to hold the powder together allowing the parts to be handled for the sintering process.

    Other methods of cold pressing include isostatic pressing and explosive forming.

    Hot Pressing
    This process involve heating the powder to a temperature above the recrystallisation temperature of the metal during the pressing process. The resulting components have a high density and accurate dimensions. The process is best completed in a reducing atmosphere or a vacuum to eliminate the risk of oxidisation of the metal. If the temperature needed is below 1000 o C then metal dies can be used otherwise graphite or ceramic materials should be used. The hot pressing process is normally carried out a pressures below 30 N mm-2.

  7. #7
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Default Sintered 'rods Or Bushes ??

    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Bell
    Exactly what are 'sintered forged steel rods'?

    Ray ,

    I would say the rods are forged steel for sure - only process to create a component to handle the stress and linear speeds.

    The sintering probably refers to the gudeon pin bushes. Sintered bronze bushes would be OK for this application and are easier to lubricate (I wonder if the have an oil gallery "feeding the bushes?)

    regards


    Rob

  8. #8
    1000+ Posts PeterT's Avatar
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    You'd have to ask why does a 2L DOHC engine with 10.8:1 CR and such big inlet valves make only 145hp in 2004 to start with! It's obviously very de-tuned in factory trim and that's why you're seeing such impressive gains. 190Nm of torque is about average these days for a 2L.

    The 1988 1.9L Mi16 engine for example, with 34mm inlets and 10.4:1 CR made 160hp. The detuned version with 9.7:1 made 145hp.

    I know there's a lot more to engines than CR and inlet valve size but you'd have to wonder !

    '92 205 Mi16
    '90 Mi16x4

  9. #9
    1000+ Posts PeterT's Avatar
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    You don't get grain flow with sintering. Grain flow is what makes things like conrods, forged steel crankshafts, axles, crane hooks etc. happen. Using the words sintered and forged together is like using hot and cold together. eg I'm going to the fridge to get a hot cold beer. (really)


    Mech. Eng., Dip Teach, BEd.,
    Newcastle Uni
    Last edited by PeterT; 18th January 2005 at 09:28 PM.

    '92 205 Mi16
    '90 Mi16x4

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