Carburettor fun (long story!)
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  1. #1
    Tadpole
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    5

    Default Carburettor fun (long story!)

    My carb question below did not generate much interest - perhaps this is the wrong forum anyway. But as my car is neither a Citroen, a Peugeot or a Renault, but has a carb well known to some of these cars, I did not know where else to put it. Whatever, some of you might enjoy this this follow-up story:

    Recently the carb has been giving me headaches. It all started 5-6 weeks ago, when it didn't react to the manual choke. Not good, with winter approaching rapidly I knew I had to look into it "soon". Then the wife reported that the gas pedal was acting "funny" when she floored it. She had to step pretty hard to get it past a certain point. "Drive slower", I told her. Hmpf.

    Last Wednesday I finally adjusted the choke cable until the valve had the prescribed 3.1 mm gap. But the engine did still not respond when applying choke. Hm. My wife took the car to work next morning, and I didn't get to drive it until Thursday night. When approaching a roundabout in town, I floored it to get ahead of a bus I otherwise would have had to stop for. The 116 wild horses came to life, the tranny kicked down, and "I won". But what the -! The throttle was jammed! In "full speed ahead" position! "Hmmm... interesting!" As I was less than a mile from home, I decided to take her home on the brakes. (Not knowing what was wrong, I did not know if I would be able to restart it if I stopped it.) Now this was a pretty exciting driving experience: The engine pulling like crazy, and my only controls were steering and brakes!

    But as these were residential streets, the traffic came to a full stop when halfway home. All I could do was turn off the ignition and hit the warning lights. Just as well, it was only a matter of time before the brakes overheated anyway. I opened the hood, and managed to pull the gas linkage free. The rest of the trip home was pretty uneventful until I was almost home, and I just had to check: Yup. Full throttle equals jammed throttle.

    It was obvious that the choke linkage interfered with the throttle linkage. I assumed that the cause was my adjustments the night before, and redid it to the old position and thought this took care of the jammed throttle problem at least. My wife took the car to work next morning (scared and cautious), and everything seemed okay. "Well, it sounds a bit rough", she told me during dinner. In the evening I drove to the airport to pick up a visiting sister. I could see in the mirror that I was acting like a fog machine, and the engine did not sound good at all. It was obvious that the mixture was way too rich. I was not very surprised when the car refused to start when I had picked up my visitor. Seriously fouled plugs out, new ones in, and after a few tries it actually fired up. But it sounded as if the engine was running on three cylinders. We limped home, but on the driveway it finally died completely. I had to swallow all pride and ask my sister's help to push the useless heap of metal into the garage.

    On Saturday I took "everything" apart, to get a real close look at this extremely complicated Solex Cisac carb. This is the last generation of carbs, and is brimming with vacuum lines in all colors you can possibly imagine, and electric wires are coming out of and going into it - only Mr. Solex in his heaven(?) knows what they do, my local dealer surely doesn't.

    However, a closer scrutiny revealed that in a particular position, the choke linkage would move about an inch sideways! The valve axle is simply a bolt, and this bolt had come loose. That was why the choke hadn't been working the last few weeks. That was why the choke linkage had been blocking its neighbour, the throttle linkage. And that was why the throttle linkage had eventually pushed on the choke linkage, resulting in full choke during normal driving.

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    A couple of turns with a 14 mm socket was all it took, once a correct diagnosis was established. With sandblasted sparkplugs it fired right up. A drive with high RPMs hopefully blew the combustion chambers clean. The engine is now purring like a happy cat, and the choke is again functional. Life is good. My brakes may be a bit worn though.

    Thanks for listening,
    Erling, Norway.

  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger! Jason Morris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Lower Hutt, New Zealand
    Posts
    126

    Default

    Well, at least you have the manual choke version - the auto choke 34/34CISAC is a pig to work on! (We should have a sweepstake as to what vehicle you're driving...1986 Volvo 240?)
    I tried three different carbs on one 505 wagon, first two had problems, final one was sort of ok. The second one had been subject to a $700 rebuild not long before, still no good! One Peugeot service agent sighed when I asked for tech info - he said there was a whole overflowing ringbinder that covered modifications and fixes for them!! We had them on late 505 with XN1A engines and eariler carby 1.9l 405's. On all my carbs the actual autochoke was great, just the rest of the carb is dodgey. (my early posts detail the sad saga of lean-mixture-pinking 505's, I ended up boring out a jet...). Now with Efi (and 2 extra cylinders!), life with a 505 estate has got a whole lot more fun!

    I hear that the car market in Norway is HEAVILY regulated - friends said they paid something like NZ$20000 (US$12000) for an '83 Corolla about five years ago! NZ is rapidly racing towards the disposable car mentality, fast 'catching up' to the UK/Europe. I'm sure froggers here would be interested to hear what some Peugeot models sell for there ?

    Jason

  3. #3
    Tadpole
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Jason,
    Thanks for taking an interest! 1986 Volvo 240?? Far from it! But as long as you ask, the answer is right here: http://home.no.net/ebrox

    I am painfully aware that my Cisac is not the world’s best carb, to say the least. But after I had it professionally rebuilt 2-3 years ago, it has actually been working quite well. Which is why the almost unused Weber 36/36 I got last year as a replacement is still sitting on the shelf. The Weber fits directly on the existing intake, and is a much simpler and better carb. But I am a bit shy to start repairing something that works...

    I like the RWD Peugeots a lot. I vividly remember the 404 of my childhood (I find/found the estates particularly nice, tried to find one as my first car but ended up with a Simca 1100). I have had my eyes on the 504 and 505, but so far I haven’t owned any. Came very close to buying a 505 GTI estate once, but no. I like the looks of the 605, but I find RWD so much easier to work on for a weekend mechanic like me.

    And you are right – because of politics/taxation, cars are extremely expensive up here, same as alcohol and tobacco. (Women are mostly free, though!) My father bought a pretty loaded 307 a couple of years ago, but I forgot what he paid. Today’s list price for a 307 1.4 XR is 200.000 NOK, or 44.300 NZD. Which is one of the reasons I seriously doubt the price you quote. I did a quick search, and found that I can pick up a few 1988 Corollas for 3000-4000 NOK/pc (660-880 NZD).

    I enclose a picture of the conflicting linkages and the troublesome bolt:



    Take care,
    Erling.

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