Fuego wheels and tyres
  • Register
  • Help
Page 1 of 2 12 Last
Results 1 to 25 of 49
  1. #1
    Member Jack Daniel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    102

    Default Fuego wheels and tyres

    Finally it’s done. New wheels for the Fuego.

    After much searching, checking, measuring, and fiddling, I came to the conclusion that putting on alloys from another car was not really an option for me. The Fuego is going to be a full restoration, long-term project that I intend to keep – so I need something I would be happy with long term.

    I couldn’t find something I really liked. I wanted 15’ or 16’ so that ruled out Camira wheels (which I think look like shit anyway). I looked at Pulsar (boring), Calibra (not to bad, but with a bloody big Holden logo in the middle), and a whole heap of wreckers for something nice, but the pickings were really slim, and most had evidence of damage and all had some sort of gutter rash. The ones that “weren’t toooooo bad” still had a centre hole to small for the Fuego, and would have had to be modified to fit – at a cost of $44 + GST for each wheel. This plus the original purchase price, made them not all that much cheaper than buying new wheels.

    I wanted something smooth (easy to clean), reasonably open (ventilation) and not too fussy (more elegant).

    My solution was to get CSA Force 2 alloys in a 16” x 7” (see attached pic). Bit more expensive than originally planed, but what I wanted. Fitted with 205/50 16 87V Toyo TPG tyres, they look pretty dam good. (87 = 545kg, V = 240kmh)

    They are something I will be happy with long term, don’t have rivets, studs, nuts, etc that make them hard to clean (used to have Simmons B45’s and they were a bitch to clean with all those lithe grooves and nuts)

    I know I have spent almost double the cost of the car ($700) on wheels and tyres, so this is not a solution for everyone, but suits me fine.

    Advertisement


    Some interesting things I found in my search.

    1. Fuego wheel size – 13.4” (340mm), 4 x 100 PCD, 38mm offset. There are heaps of other cars out there with similar size wheels, and you can go up to 16mm in either direction with offset. I don’t know about space, and I wanted to minimise stress on components so I stuck with 38mm.

    2. Myth – a centring ring is NOT essential when using tapered nuts/studs. The entire load is taken on the studs taper and the wheel hub is flush up against the wheel hub. All you have to do is make sure you tighten correctly (eg. Don’t do 1 stud up really tight and then put the others in, tighten all gradually and together to ensure correct centring) The proof of this is the original Fuego alloys – there is no centre hole and the centre of the wheel clears the hub by a fair margin.

    3. Tyre size – 205/50 16” is the best bet to fit a Fuego. Diameter is only 2mm larger, which is much more that the wear from new to worn tyres. I chose Toyo TPG’s after a fair bit of searching around. Not the greatest tyre in the world, but still a very good one. Definatly value for money.

    4. Load rating of tyres. What a bitch. Michelin TRX as fitted original have an 88 load rating (560kg). 99.999999% of tyres that fit are an 87 load rating (545kg). BUGGER. Its pretty obvious that a Fuego will never put a 560kg load on each corner (the whole car weighs 1080kg) The answer – get a tyre sticker from a car with similar size tyres (I used one from a Holden Astra 185/70 14 82H) but with a lower load rating. The chance of anyone ever checking????? Strictly speaking illegal, but my insurance company didn’t seem to think its a problem. WARNING – DON’T USE AN 82 RATED TYRE. KEEP THE MARGINS AS HIGH AS POSSIBLE.

    I'll post pictures of the wheels on the car as soon as I get it polished up all pretty like.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fuego wheels and tyres-force2.jpg  
    Never attribute to malice that which is adequatly explained by stupidity.

  2. #2
    1000+ Posts bowie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Sydney, Concord City, Sir.
    Posts
    3,372

    Default

    thanks very much for that.. the Feugeot has been interesting me for some time actually but to know they dont have a stupid alal old school peugeot wheel size is very re-assuring...

    Im actually after a slightly bigger small car.. Daihatsu Charade being 2 small.. and a 505 Peugeot just a little big.. but a slightly smaller Feugeot has me complexed...

    i think i even like the suckers..



    Excellent choice of wheels to by the way
    Last edited by bowie; 27th September 2004 at 02:42 PM.

    Works: 2003 YV Commodore (That is Cecil to you)
    Playing: R12, SuperPos, thinks It's a race car and Sunny the R12 Lego set.
    Previous: SuperGrumpy fuel spitting 504ti(ish), SuperComfortable 505 STI, SuperDoper carried my groceries Mi16, Choo Choo'd Volvo S40
    Wanted Will hoard 12/15/17 Junk.

    "More and more of less and less" - Marina Abramović

  3. #3
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    8,394

    Default

    2. Myth – a centring ring is NOT essential when using tapered nuts/studs. The entire load is taken on the studs taper and the wheel hub is flush up against the wheel hub. All you have to do is make sure you tighten correctly (eg. Don’t do 1 stud up really tight and then put the others in, tighten all gradually and together to ensure correct centring) The proof of this is the original Fuego alloys – there is no centre hole and the centre of the wheel clears the hub by a fair margin.

    Unless I'm having a blonde moment, I fail to see how the original wheel fits over the protruding hub if there is no hole in it. My trx wheels ,when veiwed from the hub side have a hub sized hole, 4x stud holes and little oval holes between those. I cant understand this 'fair margain'..??????

  4. #4
    Member Jack Daniel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    102

    Default

    [Unless I'm having a blonde moment, I fail to see how the original wheel fits over the protruding hub if there is no hole in it. My trx wheels ,when veiwed from the hub side have a hub sized hole, 4x stud holes and little oval holes between those. I cant understand this 'fair margain'..??????[/QUOTE]

    Jo,

    Yep your totally correct, I stuffed up. The Fuego wheel does have a centre recess for the protuding hub. I only looked from the outside and there was no hole all the way through - my blonde moment.

    The CSA alloys I have got, have less than 1mm larger diameter hole than the Fuego hub. Its close enough, that the hub will support the wheel while the studs are tightened.

    You still dont need the exact fit over the centre hub, as the studs carry the load and support the wheel (I have spoken to wheel engineers at CSA and they agree), but you have to get the wheels balanced at a place that has the fingers to go through the stud holes, and NOT use the centre hole of the wheel as most balancing places do.

    The CSA wheels do come into contact with the front brake caliper mounts, but CSA machined these a bit so it doesnt touch - for free "bloody amazing"

    Another thing I found was that tyre retailers refer to a book to see which size wheels and tyres will fit to all cars. This book says a 16 x 7 wheel with a 215/50 16 tyre will fit on a Fuego. I dont know if anyone has ever tried, but the 205/50 16's I have JUST clear the rear inner guard lip. I doubt if 215's would clear.

    The Fuego is polished up and ready for rego - which will be done on Friday, so I'll then put some pictures up. I'll do some pics of the wheel where it has been machined to clear the caliper as well.

    Jack
    Never attribute to malice that which is adequatly explained by stupidity.

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    8,394

    Default

    215/50/16, may just fit, but the offset would be critical.My 205/55/15's fit well but will scrub the rear, at the top of the inner guard,when bottoming out. Maybe I need to check my bumpstops.
    I would never consider what people have in their books as being reliable information. Might be OK for a falcon or holden, but not a fuego.
    Jo

  6. #6
    Administrator
    mistareno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    4,926

    Default

    Those wheels would look pretty good on a Fuego.

    Just keep an eye on the inside rear guard clearance when cornering hard.

    Your wheels have the same off-set as mine and the tyres rub if the pressures are a little low (I have 205/45 - 16's) and 50's will be very marginal on the rear.

    I hope everthing clears, those tyres wil absolutely transform the car...

  7. #7
    Member Jack Daniel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    102

    Default Wheel pics

    Here are the pics. I thnk they lokk bloody great.

    There is VERY little clearance to the rear inner guards, but I've taken it for a HARD thrash through the Adelaide hills, and there id no evidence od the touching. Must miss by a bees dick.

    I will probably go for 205/45 16's when I replace these in 20000k's or so, but at this time its OK.

    I always watch the pressures carefully, but I will stay extra vigillent.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fuego wheels and tyres-mvc-001s.jpg   Fuego wheels and tyres-mvc-002s.jpg  
    Never attribute to malice that which is adequatly explained by stupidity.

  8. #8
    Administrator
    mistareno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    4,926

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Daniel
    Here are the pics. I thnk they lokk bloody great.

    There is VERY little clearance to the rear inner guards, but I've taken it for a HARD thrash through the Adelaide hills, and there id no evidence od the touching. Must miss by a bees dick.

    I will probably go for 205/45 16's when I replace these in 20000k's or so, but at this time its OK.

    I always watch the pressures carefully, but I will stay extra vigillent.

    I suppose my car is a fraction lower than that

    It just seemed to rub on the tar coating and not the steel.

    It has not rubbed on mine for atleast a year or so, perhaps it has "removed" the top layer of tar...

    I have also changed tyres recently and I dont think the new ones are quite as "square"...

    BTW - They look great...It was shortly after fitting my wheels that I realised just how crap the seats are in a Fuego...

    I also have similar priorities to you when it comes to wheel selection....

    The KISS principle is usually a safe one...

    Must admit, I am getting a bit bored now with the wheels..might be time for some newbies at the next tyre change..


    Last edited by mistareno; 5th November 2004 at 11:04 PM.

  9. #9
    Member Jack Daniel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    102

    Default Your wheels look great to.

    Your wheels look great to, so you would probably have no problems selling them to change.

    I like your black bumpers too. I have been thinking what to do (body colour, black, or try to get something to make them look original), but I've pretty much settled on black as well. I dont care about the grain - infact I would rather not have it - and if I go black, its easier to colour match everything else.
    Never attribute to malice that which is adequatly explained by stupidity.

  10. #10
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Melbourne Victoria
    Posts
    11,761

    Default Fuego - rear inner clearance

    When
    Dianne had her new wheels fitted they could not get the inner rings, so she was told to take it easy driving until they were fitted a few days later. (Bob Jane Preston) On the way home she heard a scraping noise while cornering and closer examination revealed the new low profile tyres were hitting/scaping the inside of the rear wheel housing.

    I fixed that simply by applying "delicate pressure" with a 14lb sledge hammer swung with gusto!! This "delicate" operation gave plenty of clearance in the relevant area.

    Remove the wheel of course prior to whacking the sledge hammer along and above the rub marks - be careful you don't damage the exterior panel work in your enthusiasm

    She's never had a problem with the wheels scraping since then.

    Ken

  11. #11
    Administrator
    mistareno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    4,926

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Daniel
    Your wheels look great to, so you would probably have no problems selling them to change.

    I like your black bumpers too. I have been thinking what to do (body colour, black, or try to get something to make them look original), but I've pretty much settled on black as well. I dont care about the grain - infact I would rather not have it - and if I go black, its easier to colour match everything else.
    The rear bar on my car is still the original grey colour and the front bar (which is an undamaged but faded bar taken from another car) has been re coloured in the original (or damn close) grey, using a commonly available product called VHT Penetrating Vinyl Dye (charcoal grey)

    It was great in the wasy that it didn't build up and smooth the grain at all.

    I personally like the original grey bumpers as I have seen several colour coded Fuego's and they never quite look right IMHO...

    I have also seen alot of Fuegos that have had the bumpers repaired and repainted black and in the process lost the grain. As a result they also often look a tad shite...

  12. #12
    Member Jack Daniel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    102

    Default Sorry

    They must just look black in the photos. I'll still go that way though.
    Never attribute to malice that which is adequatly explained by stupidity.

  13. #13
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    8,394

    Default

    Some interesting things I found in my search.

    1. Fuego wheel size – 13.4” (340mm), 4 x 100 PCD, 38mm offset. There are heaps of other cars out there with similar size wheels, and you can go up to 16mm in either direction with offset. I don’t know about space, and I wanted to minimise stress on components so I stuck with 38mm.

    2. Myth – a centring ring is NOT essential when using tapered nuts/studs. The entire load is taken on the studs taper and the wheel hub is flush up against the wheel hub. All you have to do is make sure you tighten correctly (eg. Don’t do 1 stud up really tight and then put the others in, tighten all gradually and together to ensure correct centring) The proof of this is the original Fuego alloys – there is no centre hole and the centre of the wheel clears the hub by a fair margin.

    RE MYTH no2
    One of my recent aquisitions is a fuego with aftermarket 14 inch wheels. I took it for a high speed run last night and had to stop accelerating at 120 Kph as the vibration was very un-nerving. This was disapointing as this car has the best motor/box off all the fuego's I've owned, and was expecting more. Today I jacked the car up and it was of no suprise to find NO centering rings, and just to top it off, differing stud sizes. I'll be going to tempe tyres tomorrow to get some rings, and will repeat the exersize, hopefully sans vibration. At last I'll be able to reveal weather or not the myth of the rings is correct
    Jo

  14. #14
    Gone Fishin' Ray Bell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Burpengary and Murrumburrah, Qld and NSW
    Posts
    9,223

    Default

    Just to clarify one more point...

    The entire load isn't taken by the studs and nuts. The nuts centre the wheel and then the load is taken elsewhere.

    "Just where?" you might ask.

    Glad you asked... the load is taken by the friction between the wheel and the hub. That's where.

  15. #15
    Budding Architect ???? pugrambo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Parkes - N.S.W - Australia - Earth
    Posts
    12,256

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Bell
    Just to clarify one more point...

    The entire load isn't taken by the studs and nuts. The nuts centre the wheel and then the load is taken elsewhere.

    "Just where?" you might ask.

    Glad you asked... the load is taken by the friction between the wheel and the hub. That's where.

    the friction does take some load but the studs also take load as well

    this is why early V8 commodores used to break studs off on rear axles as they weren't strong enough to handle the load going through them
    3 x '78 604 SL

    1 x '98 306 GTi6

    1 x secret project

    1 x '98 406 STDT troop carrier and i don't care if it stinks, i don't sniff it's arse Death by wank tank

    1 x '99 406SV 5spd wagon, time to burn more fuel

    1 x 1994 605 SV3.0


    WTD long range fuel tank for 605

  16. #16
    Gone Fishin' Ray Bell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Burpengary and Murrumburrah, Qld and NSW
    Posts
    9,223

    Default

    If you observe the difference between a Peugeot wheel fixing and a Commodore, the most outstanding thing is that there's a step on the Peugeot stud to locate the wheel.

    This step, right at the root of the stub, must be very strong, yet it doesn't interfere with doing the nut up or anything.

    How easy it would be to use steps like that on studs on every car. But they don't, do they?

    They have studs that reach out some distance from the hub without contacting anything. And the contact with the wheels is taken by the nut.

    That being the case, if there is any load to be transmitted, it's being done right away from the hub face.

    Doesn't sound like good engineering practice to me.

    On the other hand, almost every car on the road is built that way, so something must be going on with these designers. Maybe they know what they're doing?

    Must do, I've never yet heard of a Commodore V8 of any age breaking wheels studs.

    And they were bigger studs than the big Holdens had too. And on a bigger pitch circle than the hottest 350 Monaros had as well.

  17. #17
    Budding Architect ???? pugrambo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Parkes - N.S.W - Australia - Earth
    Posts
    12,256

    Default

    it was a common problem believe me for the early V8 commodores yet the 6cyl version at the same time didn't and they had the same studs across the range
    3 x '78 604 SL

    1 x '98 306 GTi6

    1 x secret project

    1 x '98 406 STDT troop carrier and i don't care if it stinks, i don't sniff it's arse Death by wank tank

    1 x '99 406SV 5spd wagon, time to burn more fuel

    1 x 1994 605 SV3.0


    WTD long range fuel tank for 605

  18. #18
    Gone Fishin' Ray Bell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Burpengary and Murrumburrah, Qld and NSW
    Posts
    9,223

    Default

    Where do you get these stories? I've seen a stack of V8 Commodores and I've yet to see a broken wheel stud. If it was common, you can bet I'd have heard of it somewhere.

  19. #19
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Ballarat,Vic,Aust.
    Posts
    16,366

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mistareno
    Those wheels would look pretty good on a Fuego.

    Just keep an eye on the inside rear guard clearance when cornering hard.

    Your wheels have the same off-set as mine and the tyres rub if the pressures are a little low (I have 205/45 - 16's) and 50's will be very marginal on the rear.

    I hope everthing clears, those tyres wil absolutely transform the car...
    He might just get away with it. My brothers Fuego had 16" wheels with 215/45 rubber. That's thing had so much traction it was incredible. If you were suicidal you could push it to the point where it would litterally skitter across the road in almost a 4wheel drift (very low speed corners). A brilliant machine to hammer around town in, the manual steering was lightened to the point of being lighter than the power steered models due to the low profile of the rubber. The tires didn't touch at all. Your ride quality will deteriate, it has to with so low profile rubber that needs to run high tire pressures.


    There is simply no doubt, the car will be transformed once you get rid of those god awful TRX tires

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/citro%EBn-forum/90325-best-project-car-you-have-ever-seen.html
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  20. #20
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Ballarat,Vic,Aust.
    Posts
    16,366

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Bell
    Just to clarify one more point...

    The entire load isn't taken by the studs and nuts. The nuts centre the wheel and then the load is taken elsewhere.

    "Just where?" you might ask.

    Glad you asked... the load is taken by the friction between the wheel and the hub. That's where.
    You will find some wheels come with a plastic ring that you press into the center hole in order to aid wheel mounting. The wheels are a [email protected] to get on if you don't have a center hole that matches. (remember the rings are plastic, they are not designed to take any loads other than mounting the wheels).

    My CX2500 GTi Turbo has aftermarket wheels with centers that do not match. In order to stop the vibration you mention, install all tapered wheel studs and gently tighten all the studs hand tight rocking the wheel as you go (to ensure all the tapers sit correctly). Then tighten each wheel nut.

    I tried the plastic inserts that allow the center hole to line up on my car, there was an edge on them that prevented the wheel sitting flush to the wheel mount on the car. Sure it made putting the wheels on easy, but the car would vibrate at 60km/h as the plastic insert was holding the wheel at an angle

    You best bet (for ease of wheel mounting) would be to get a set of these plastic inserts for the Fuego, they worked quite well on my brothers car.

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=90325
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  21. #21
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    8,394

    Default

    The rings I got from Tempe Tyres, when I bought new alloys, were aluminium and fitted so snugly to the hub that a knife or sharp chisel was required to remove them.It made locating the wheel easier than with the plastic ones that tended to fall out of place.
    Jo

  22. #22
    Member Jack Daniel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    102

    Default Follow up on Fuego wheels and spacers

    After 6 months of use, varying from commuting to Sunday thrashes to a 400km trip (average speed 136kmh, and a highest speed of approx 180kmh - whoops-slipped), I can safely say that centering rings are not needed if you use tapered studs and do them up correctly. Centering rings actually wouldnt fit between the hub and the wheel, as my vernier calipers tell me there is only 1.3mm difference.

    I have had no evidence of vibration at any speed (Toyo GWUN tyres 205/50 16, CSA Force 2 alloys with the inner hub lip machined to clear the calipers - properly balanced, new longer studs) and have just done a carefull inspection of the studs, threads and wheels, and there is no sign of movement/stress/thread or surface damage or anything else out of the ordinary.

    This is probably helped by wheels/studs that are designed for a much heavier car, so the light Fuego causes no stress.

    I will inspect again after another 6 months just to make sure, but overall I am very happy with the results.

    Handling has improved dramatically over the admittedly stuffed TRX's, and with a 34psi F & 32psi R, I get pretty neutral handling. 4 wheel drifts if you set it up properly, and only noticable understeer if you really stuff up entry speed.

    My only concern is the ability to get it over the pits here in WA when I change the rego over, but I have a set of 14" alloys I just picked up for $50, that will pass rego.

    I'll follow up again in another 6 months
    Never attribute to malice that which is adequatly explained by stupidity.

  23. #23
    1000+ Posts bowie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Sydney, Concord City, Sir.
    Posts
    3,372

    Default

    glad to hear all is going well..

    i must confess, im oftyen complexed by these wondefull handeling stories that these feugeot's have.. i was always undder the impression that live rear axel was nasty thing.. but like i said.. all im hearing is glowing reports,

    What are thee Feugeots doing so well ??

    Works: 2003 YV Commodore (That is Cecil to you)
    Playing: R12, SuperPos, thinks It's a race car and Sunny the R12 Lego set.
    Previous: SuperGrumpy fuel spitting 504ti(ish), SuperComfortable 505 STI, SuperDoper carried my groceries Mi16, Choo Choo'd Volvo S40
    Wanted Will hoard 12/15/17 Junk.

    "More and more of less and less" - Marina Abramović

  24. #24
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    8,394

    Default

    I've just replaced the wobbly wheels with ones I know have no problems.Will do a test run now to see if there is an improvement,and if not I guess I'll start loking elsewhere in the front end.
    Jo

  25. #25
    Gone Fishin' Ray Bell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Burpengary and Murrumburrah, Qld and NSW
    Posts
    9,223

    Default

    Originally posted by Jack Daniel
    .....have just done a careful inspection of the studs, threads and wheels, and there is no sign of movement/stress/thread or surface damage or anything else out of the ordinary.....
    As noted previously, it's the friction between the hub and wheel faces that holds it all in place...

    Just to further explain how strong such a joint can be... a number of years ago the Sports Sedan guys discovered that the Falcon 250 crank was pretty close to the same size as a Holden crank, so a bit of machining here and there allowed them to put the Falcon crank into the Holden block and gain a bundle of capacity.

    But they had to put a larger flywheel boss on the end of the crank to suit the Holden flywheel.

    So they machined up a ring that had a bore .003" (three thou, that is) smaller than the diameter of the circle on the Falcon crank and shrunk the ring on there.

    It wasn't welded, it was just an interference fit, friction held it in place... while 250+ horsepower was poured through it constantly! And it held in place for gearchanges, clutches dropped off the line, everything.

    The engineers tell me you mustn't underestimate the holding power of friction. But it only works if your nuts are done up tight enough, of course.

Page 1 of 2 12 Last

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •