stopping distances of Xantia with ABS
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  1. #1
    Tadpole
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    Default stopping distances of Xantia with ABS

    I used to own a 1979 GS and to this day I have never driven a car with more powerful brakes. The car would stop from any speed almost instantly and without lockup. Iím considering the purchase of a used 2000 Xantia with ABS. During hard dry road braking the ABS shudders away but the car continues on as if were on ice! It seems that ABS causes to car to take longer to stop. If this is so, is it possible to disable the ABS? Iím assuming that this would restore the Citroenís legendary short stopping distances. What do your experts think about this idea? Has anyone else tried it?

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  2. #2
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    ABS will cut in *only* if the wheels lock up (so you've braked harder than the tyres can handle). In this situation, yes, the braking distance is greater - but the benefit is you can steer to avoid dangerous situations. ABS is usually disabled by pulling a fuse.

    I know which one I'd rather have

    Derek.

  3. #3
    1000+ Posts tekkie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philip3
    I used to own a 1979 GS and to this day I have never driven a car with more powerful brakes. The car would stop from any speed almost instantly and without lockup. Iím considering the purchase of a used 2000 Xantia with ABS. During hard dry road braking the ABS shudders away but the car continues on as if were on ice! It seems that ABS causes to car to take longer to stop. If this is so, is it possible to disable the ABS? Iím assuming that this would restore the Citroenís legendary short stopping distances. What do your experts think about this idea? Has anyone else tried it?
    Phillip, before you take drastic measures of disabling the ABS, check tyre pressures, brake fluid, pads and quality of tyres.

    As Deka mentioned ABS cuts in ONLY when there is a loss of grip and wheels stop spinning. Something on that car is causing premature brake lockup.

    Also check with your insurance company what they think about ABS disabled car with relation to your insurance coverage.
    .
    1300cc's of jap buzzbox delivered the times below.

    EC 1:54.6 , Wakefield 1:13.15 , OP (short) 52.00 , OP GP 1:24.40


  4. #4
    Tadpole
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    Default There are no faults. Prhaps ABS is not meant for dry roads.

    I think that the ABS on the Xantia works normally as in most other cars that Iíve driven with ABSóincluding the new C5. There is no fault. What I mean by ďnormallyĒ is that before the car achieves maximum retardation the ABS releases the grip of the calipers in order to prevent lock-up. This repeated on/off process automatically increases braking distances on a dry road, but may be an advantage on a wet road. It rarely rains here and I donít have to worry about my insurance company, so why not disconnect the ABS? After all, the GS didnít have ABS and the brakes were amazing!
    I once timed the stopping power of my GS from 100>0. I got 2.2 seconds with a hand held stop watch.
    But it is well known among enthusiast drivers that ABS increases stopping distances on dry roads. And this has also been my experience based on owing about 20 different cars, including five Citroens. You get much more of a bite without ABS. I'd rather modulate the lock up myself. With ABS I feel helpless just waiting for the car to finally stop--it's unnerving.
    Further, there are lots speed nuts. I'm a braking nut. Powerful deceleration is my thing. BTW, from my experience a Ford Focus with ABS stops faster than a C5.

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts tekkie's Avatar
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    sorry Phillip but I have to disagree. If your tyres and braking system is ok the ABS can be controlled by driver pedal input as it only kicks in AFTER you lock up the wheels. So in effect if your braking system is ok and you as a driver can modulate the brake pedal to prevent lockup you should not be be experiencing longer stopping distances.
    Things like smaller diameter discs, poor quality brake fluid, everage brake pads, and incorrected bias front to rear (including badly matched pads) and either overinflated or just plain crappy hard tyres will cause less than optimum braking system.
    ABS only prevents sliding with locked brakes.
    What I am trying to say is that if you disconnect the ABS you will manage to lock up the brakes and come to a stop sliding but that will not be the optimum braking distance.

    To actually disconnect the ABS all you have to do is to disconnect the electrical sensor on one of the wheels. The system will see the O/C and disable the ABS for you reverting to hydraulic system only.

    good luck with your experiments.
    .
    1300cc's of jap buzzbox delivered the times below.

    EC 1:54.6 , Wakefield 1:13.15 , OP (short) 52.00 , OP GP 1:24.40


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