$70 afm interceptor
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  1. #1
    Member casterbased's Avatar
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    Icon6 $70 afm interceptor

    what do u guys think about jaycars new digital fuel adjuster kit that costs only $70 and comes with a hand controller for $50

    look at jaycars web sight for info

    i'm going to try one on my v8 discovery, and if its good my 205

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  2. #2
    1000+ Posts Dave's Avatar
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    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=type width="72%" bgColor=#f2f2f2>STOCK-CODE: KC5385 - New Product </TD><TD class=type align=right width="28%" bgColor=#f2f2f2>RRP: $79.95 </TD></TR><TR bgColor=#d0e0e8><TD colSpan=2><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=type>Qty 1+ $79.95</TD><TD class=type align=middle>Qty 5+ $71.95 </TD><TD class=type align=right> </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD class=type vAlign=top colSpan=2>Digital Fuel Adjuster

    Ref: High Performance Electronic Project for Cars – Silicon Chip Publications.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-comfficeffice" /><o:p></o:p>


    This unit is a huge revolution in DIY automotive performance. It gives you the power to completely tune the air/fuel ratio throughout the entire load range, at 128 load points, providing incredible mapping resolution and brilliant drivability. It uses the Handheld Digital Controller – KC5386, so there is no need for a laptop, and it supports both static and real-time mapping. It can be used on 0-5V and 0-12V signals, so it is compatible with all voltage output airflow meters and MAP sensors. It can also be set to work with 0-1V signals, allowing modification of EGO sensor signals. This unit has been extensively tested on a wide range of cars including Subaru Impreza WRX and STi, Nissan 200SX, BMW 735i, Lexus LS400, and Nissan Maxima. Kit supplied with PCB, machined case, and all electronic components. Kit requires the Handheld Digital Controller – KC5386.

    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
    Sounds interesting.

    Dave


  3. #3
    Member casterbased's Avatar
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    a review of the kit

    So - back to this weekend - I spent the daylight hours working with my fiancé Georgina, as she punched the keys on the digital hand controller and I drove the cars and offered advice. The cars were (sequentially) my 1988 Nissan Maxima V6 Turbo import and then my 1998 Lexus LS400. We were tuning the air/fuel ratios using a brilliant new DIY kit interceptor designed as part of this electronics book. The kit is likely to be stocked by Jaycar Electronics and should be well under AUD$200 (maybe even only $150!); the ability to fine-tune the air/fuel ratios is quite extraordinary.

    Injector swaps, airflow meter swaps, tweaking the high load mixtures - all are possible. And then add to that the fact that the interceptor will work with 0-5V (common airflow meters), 0-12V (less common airflow meters) or 0-1V (oxygen sensor signals) and you can see why I am excited.

    On the Maxima the interceptor (which we'll call a Digital Fuel Adjuster, or DFA), worked perfectly. Two changes were made to the mixtures of the Nissan - leaning out the full-load mixtures (which were typically over-rich), and tipping-in a bit of extra fuel as the car came onto boost. At full load we changed a 6000 rpm 11.2:1 to 12.5: 1, at a full-load 5000 rpm we went from 11.3:1 to 12.7:1 and at 4000 rpm we leaned from 11.7:1 to 12.6:1. As the car came on boost we went from a near-stoichiometric 14.5:1 to a much more power-friendly 12.9:1.

    And yes, the car sure responded.

    But not content with that we also upped the boost, firstly from a standard 0.4 Bar to 1 Bar, then back to 0.6 Bar (the intercooler was getting a bit too hot at 1 Bar!). And both times we were able to tune the mixtures to suit - with all testing being done on the road. And that's not only the full-load mixtures, but also the part-throttle air/fuel ratios (out of closed loop, of course).

    The Lexus was a bit trickier - as with any prototype testing, we found that a few changes to the kit would need to be made. (These alterations might add - er - $4 to the price...)

    One interesting thing we found is that the Lexus stays in closed loop until quite high loads, but we were still able to alter full-load air/fuel ratios from around 11:1 to typically 12.5:1. Interestingly, the peak injector duty cycle (displayed on a digital meter which is another DIY project from the book!) dropped from 74 to 65 per cent. 0-100 km/h times showed an improvement of about 2/10ths of a second, but the important stuff is that even on a sophisticated car like the Lexus (four oxygen sensors...) we were still able to change high load mixtures seamlessly and with absolute smoothness.

    No driving glitches here.

    And the Autronic air/fuel ratio meter that we were using for all this testing? Funny thing is that we borrowed it from a company that has its own sophisticated interceptor, a product that in some ways this cheap DIY project will be in competition with...

    ChipTorque has developed the Xede, which in addition to fuelling changes can also do timing and boost control - and other things as well. But Lachlan Riddel - head honcho of ChipTorque - and his chief tuner Matthew Spry were fascinated by my plans for a budget DIY kit interceptor; interested enough to make available the company's Autronic air/fuel ratio meter for a weekend of testing.

    The unkind could suggest that they wanted to see the testing fail in the most glorious way possible, so that they could say "Told ya!". But I don't think that is true: instead I think it more likely that despite some minor commercial conflicts of interest, the technicalities just entranced them to a degree that they wanted to become involved. And to be honest, their product can do infinitely more than the tested prototype kit - and for the dollars being asked, you'd hope so!

    So right now I am putting the prototype DFA through its paces on a long-term test: the device will stay in my car from hereon. The electronics project book - still to be named - will be sold through the AutoSpeed shop, in addition to newsagents here in Australia and New Zealand, but realistically the publication is still about 6-8 months away.

    But hey, I just had to share that excitement. Real-time tuning the air/fuel ratios with a digital hand controller - and the whole lot a kit costing under two hundred Australian bucks...
    2008 Fiesta XR4 "ST150"
    -Cosworth cams, Cosworth intake manifold, CIA "K&N", Dream science, De-Cat, Eibach, Bilsteins, White Line sway bar "rear", EBC Rotors and pads, Goodridge brake lines, OZ Racing wheels, Toyo R1R

    1964 S2a Land Rover LWB
    -Served with the 1st Australian Task Force, Vietnam, original condition

    1994 S3 205 GTI
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  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger! crosspug's Avatar
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    OK, stupid question alert

    I understand what the unit is completing A/F ratio wise but.....

    So is this kit replacing a basic ECU ala *Fuel only ECU* or in addition to an ecu ie piggyback style??

    Either way this could be a VERY interesting proposition.

    Jono
    Last edited by crosspug; 18th August 2004 at 04:15 AM.
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  5. #5
    Fellow Frogger! MYT205's Avatar
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    An "interceptor" slots in between the sensor and the computer altering the signal from the sensor to make the computer think that it is seeing values that it isn't. Thus the computer will tip in more or less fuel depending on what the interceptor is telling it.

    As a result these systems have to be used in conjuction with another computer, the standard computer. In some circumstances these systems are good in that you retain all the original features of the computer like cold start, crank fuelling etc.

    For the $129 for the kit and controller it is something definately worth considering if you like to tinker. The hardest part is getting a good air fuel ratio meter to tune it with. There is no way I would even try it without one.

  6. #6
    1000+ Posts tekkie's Avatar
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    Last time I spoke to Jaycar they were talking end of September before it arrives on the shelves.

    Apexi S-FEC does the same job at considerably more cost to the buyer.
    another system is either ARC1, ARC2 or PSC1 from www.splitsec.com
    .
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  7. #7
    1000+ Posts PeterT's Avatar
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    [The hardest part is getting a good air fuel ratio meter to tune it with. There is no way I would even try it without one.[/QUOTE]

    I've got narrow band 02 sensor which I calibrated against a known reliable 02 sensor. So for $60 I can accurately tune from 12:1 to 14.7:1.

    '92 205 Mi16
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  8. #8
    Member casterbased's Avatar
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    how good are the o2 sensors off the vs or vt commies, their computers (delco) can learn to compinsate for up to 6psi of boost. i can get them cheap

    are the autometer lean rich guages shit, what about jaycars top of the range o2 unit for $69 that displays numbers as well as lights
    2008 Fiesta XR4 "ST150"
    -Cosworth cams, Cosworth intake manifold, CIA "K&N", Dream science, De-Cat, Eibach, Bilsteins, White Line sway bar "rear", EBC Rotors and pads, Goodridge brake lines, OZ Racing wheels, Toyo R1R

    1964 S2a Land Rover LWB
    -Served with the 1st Australian Task Force, Vietnam, original condition

    1994 S3 205 GTI
    -3L 406 V6 Conversion

    2009 Husqvarna TE510
    -Blinged

  9. #9
    Fellow Frogger! MondeoST24's Avatar
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    You need a wide band oxygen sensor to do things like setting up mixtures. A normal O2 sensor isn't good enough and is only accurate around 14.7:1 ratios.

    There are kit A:F ratio meters available with wide band sensors but none are cheap.... The wideband sensors alone are over the $200 mark from what I've seen.

    Sounds like an awesome kit!
    David
    Former 306 S16 owner- now own a Mondeo ST24 V6

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