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Thread: Windscreen Scratches

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    Fellow Frogger! geodon's Avatar
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    Default Windscreen Scratches

    A new screen for my Dauphine is proving very hard to find so I want to explore if scratch removal technology has advanced in recent times.

    I have an arc on the driver's side that is the result of not replacing the wiper rubber in time.

    It will difficult to get a RWC as it sits in the driver's direct line of vision.

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    When cleaned up, I can't feel a depression when I drag a fingernail across it.

    Is it a DIY scenario? Or can anyone recommend a scratch removal operator?
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    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Scratches are filled with a liquid that allegedly dries to match the refractive index of the original screen.

    I've seem wildly varying results. With the "repair" charges not necessarily commensurate with the quality of the repair.

    I'd look for a word of mouth referral.
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    In the past, I have used 000 steel-wool (The finest version, from memory) and a paste made up of talcum powder and Brasso. It worked fine on a similar scratch in an old Renault 10 screen. The father-in-law showed me how. He was an old school toolmaker, who used the pasted to polish the faces on the triangular wires used in the jig for the first XW Falcon tail-light lenses.

    Like anything, try a test area first to make sure you are happy with the result.

    Cheers

    Dano

    Edit: After thought. There is another product I seen used on some old louvre glass that was badly scratched. It is English whiting. It is also made into a paste. It is available from glaziers and good quality art suppliers like Eckerleys.

    https://www.eckersleys.com.au/products/whiting-powder
    Whiting Powder
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    Whiting Powder is used in the preparation of etching plates. It is made of ground calcium carbonate chalk and free from impurities. Mix with water to create a paste to degrease copper or zinc plates before applying ground or aquatinting. To remove tarnishes from plates, mix whiting powder with ammonia.


    http://www.polish-up.com.au/products/whiting-powder-vienne-lime-250-grams.htmlProduct

    Description


    Vienna Lime Cleaning Powder Or Whiting Powder
    Excellent for use with our polishing kits.
    Use this after you have finished polishing to remove grease and compound residues after polishing. Apply it to a clean lint free cloth and wipe where you've been polishing. Please note that Vienna Lime is not an actual lime powder but a pure form of super fine calcium carbonate (chalk).




    Last edited by Dano; 15th December 2017 at 09:34 PM.
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    1000+ Posts Beano's Avatar
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    This is a subject that has been discussed previously, with a few different opinions. You might like to do a forum search. I seem to remember that there was no real consensus, and I do sometimes contemplate my buffing pad and my own windscreen.

    If it was myself, I would take it to a place that specialises in stainless steel polishing. They do great work and understand polishing with different grades of abrasive. The only problem is that the screen is still in the car, isn't it ? The last stainless polisher I saw was a guy with a respirator, in a room filled with fluff and crap from the polishing wheels. But there was very shiny metal there. He did bumper bars....

    But firstly, since it is not at all deep, give it a go yourself. Get a polishing buff attachment for your drill, made of lambswool (they can't cost much in Supercheap) , and use extra-cut polish. It's one step down (less abrasive) than cutting compound. Just persevere and use a fair bit of polish......
    Extra-cut won't be too abrasive, nor will it be not abrasive enough.

    If that doesn't work, start with cutting compound....then progress to extra-cut.. But by then, you may have spent half what you would pay some dude in a polishing shop to do it...

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    1000+ Posts Fordman's Avatar
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    When I was an apprentice mechanic (wow, that was 50 years ago!) we used something called "Jeweller's Rouge" for polishing slight damage to the glass, ie, wiper scrape marks. It was a very fine abrasive paste, presumably what jeweller's used in their trade. I didn't use it much, but remember that it required a fair bit of elbow grease, probably easier these days with a small electric buffer.

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    bob
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    G'day,

    Quote Originally Posted by Fordman View Post
    When I was an apprentice mechanic (wow, that was 50 years ago!) we used something called "Jeweller's Rouge" for polishing slight damage to the glass, ie, wiper scrape marks. It was a very fine abrasive paste, presumably what jeweller's used in their trade. I didn't use it much, but remember that it required a fair bit of elbow grease, probably easier these days with a small electric buffer.

    Cheers.
    yep, polishing the pivot points on clock balance wheels. Dad used to do it on the baby lathe, only took a minute or two to get a mirror finish on the hardened steel. Like boots, it was all spit 'n polish, wet the end of a stick [rather like a skewer with a flat end] pick up a bit rouge, and off you go. Could be wrong, but I think it was supplied like a block of soap as well as powder.

    cheers,
    Bob

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    Hi I have seen scratches polished from glass using a clay block and a buff.
    Marty

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    I would have thought that a potential problem with any polishing option would be having sufficiently even resultant depth for distortion-free vision.

    That said, & even if my fears are well-grounded, it might work well enough to look well enough for registration purposes. This would allow you limited use of the doaf whilst tracking down a replacement (good used?).

    cheers! Peter

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    1000+ Posts alan moore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by geodon View Post
    A new screen for my Dauphine is proving very hard to find
    The safety glass windscreen in my wife's Dauphine G was broken on the way to the 4CV muster Easter last year. Made a claim through Shannons, that use O'Briens, who ordered one through Ralf Moore Autoglass from Pilkingtons in the UK. It seems Pilkingtons are moving their car glass division to Finland, and as such are having some trouble with supply. Had word from O'Briens that the glass is 3 weeks away, although I won't hold my breath. Might be worth putting in an order at Ralf Moore for a laminated Dauphine screen at this point.
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    One of my latest hobbies is watch servicing and restoration. For scratched watch crystals (hard glass ones, not acrylic) it's common to use cerium oxide. It's used for windscreens as well. It's a pink powder you mix with water and use with a powered felt buffer (or by hand with some watches).

    There's a supplier on eBay called Polish Up who sells it in small batches for not much who I can recommend. They're in QLD. A 100g bag is about $12. They have a kit for windscreens but it seems overpriced - just buy the powder and your own felt buffer if you're interested.

    I have optical grade but for windscreens I think they use a slightly more active grit.

    I read recently that it is not only an abrasive but has some reaction with the glass and has to be kept wet not only to keep it cool.

    Here they are: https://www.ebay.com.au/sch/polishup...p2047675.l2562
    Last edited by Stuey; 21st March 2018 at 06:00 PM.
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    1000+ Posts Beano's Avatar
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    Great info, Stuey !

    I've seen those felt pads for drills at my local Supercheap Auto place.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuey View Post
    One of my latest hobbies is watch servicing and restoration.
    I have taken note of that Stuey......
    JohnW

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    Ha ha. It's an eye opener, literally. Working on a ladies ETA 1170 (Swiss, 1948) at the moment where the whole movement can be covered by the pad of my thumb, working with parts that I can't see without 10x magnification. Requires a microscope to oil particular parts (pallet jewels). Such beautiful workmanship though, even though this was a bread and butter movement for the Swiss.

    I seriously brushed a screw off the table thinking it was a crumb. Note to self: scones are not allowed in the breaks.

    I'm learning a load of fine motor skills, for sure.

    The oil used works out to $15,000 a litre. Luckily 2ml will last me years.
    Last edited by Stuey; 22nd March 2018 at 02:29 PM.
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    Fellow Frogger! geodon's Avatar
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    Default Dauphine Front Park Lights/Turn Signals

    Windscreen Scratches-img_2161.jpgWindscreen Scratches-img_2162.jpgWindscreen Scratches-img_2163.jpg

    Thanks for the screen comment/advice.

    The tester I use regularly has advised that new regs for red plates have become more lenient & is confident mine will be OK

    I'm doing an audit for lights prior to going to the paint shop.

    I have lights that fit in 2 holes in the front valence panel with 3 self tappers that have amber lenses. They have single filament globes. That strongly suggests turn signals, yes?

    BUT there are 2 wires for each hole: one light, one much heavier implying a combined park/flasher light that SHOULD have a clear lens.

    There is NO provision for park lights in the headlights.

    What's going on??

    I'm thinking a model change. Was there a earlier series that had no front parkers??

    Whoops! Most of this is for my resto thread. Sorry!!
    Last edited by geodon; 21st May 2018 at 11:00 AM. Reason: more info
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    On an Australian 1961 onwards Dauphine Gordini the amber front blinkers are standard, the parking lights were fitted to the headlamp, in the form of a separate bulb mounted to the plug that connects to the main (P45t base) headlamp globe. The parker bulb uses a hole in the base of the metal surround for the main headlamp globe to allow illumination. Unfortunately not all of the P45t base globes have the hole for the parker light any more, it is mainly a case of going to a patient old school auto electrician with a sample globe, who then sorts through their old 6 volt stock to find suitable globes with the parker hole. Or you can carefully drill a hole in the surround of the globe to allow the parker to illuminate.

    A dual filament globe with a white (clear) parker/blinker lens was fitted to the European market cars, and can be fitted to the base of the existing blinker only base (there are two screw holes in the base for wires. But no bulb contact for the parker, which needs to be fabricated). As well as diverting the parker power wire to the new blinker/parker base. Iím not sure of the legality of orange parkers (some early 1960ís Minis also had them) in a modern context, and also with 6 volts, the blinker may get lost with the parker also illuminating through the same light.

    I like the odd Australian difference with the cars, which is why I like the amber coloured blinkers, and also the Thorpe rear light cluster.
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    1000+ Posts Beano's Avatar
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    I have taken Stuey's suggestion and got some cerium oxide from Ebay. Plus a felt pad for my drill. Just waiting for the time and energy to polish the little scratches off my windscreen.....in the afternoon sun they are extensive.

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    They grind telescope mirrors so why not your windscreen?
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    Beano, the trick is to keep it moist, apparently. Said the actress to the bishop.


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    I'll also watch for a "result" report. I am still sceptical of success in avoiding distortion but would be delighted to be proven wrong. I suggest trying things out on somewhere unimportant like the lower left.

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    I think it's a given there will be some distortion. There has to be.
    Last edited by Stuey; 22nd May 2018 at 01:17 PM.


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    Hi
    There are kits on Ebay and elsewhere specifically designed for removing scratches from windscreens. Plus instruction videos on Youtube. They do use cerium oxide, but other things as well, I think. Anyway, worth a look. I gave it a half hearted go on a scratched windscreen and it certainly isn't a fast process. Regarding distortion, I expect that is very much dependent on how deep the scratch is, and that with enough polishing it would be minimal. Or not even there Plus the scratch from the tip of a wiper arm isn't directly in your line of sight when driving.

    Regards
    Andy

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    1000+ Posts Peter Chisholm's Avatar
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    As far as I know, polishing the scratches from windscreens is only suitable if the scratches are light. Polishing out deep scratches will inevitably lead to noticeable distortion.

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    1000+ Posts Beano's Avatar
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    In the Youtube clip I watched, the guy used made a mixture of rubbing compound and pumice-based hand cleaner. Then he used an air-powered drill (which goes at quite a high speed) holding the felt pad. You couldn't really tell how long it took because the video was sped up due to the tediousness of watching the whole thing at normal speed. But it wasn't incredibly long.

    My windscreen has a lot of very small surface scratches and minute chips that thankfully are only visible in the late afternoon and sunset. But then they are quite irritating.

    As I already have some rubbing compound I might get some pumice hand cleaner, then finish off with the cerium oxide. Once I get around to doing it I shall post the results here.

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    VIP Sponsor 59 Floride's Avatar
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    Speaking of windscreens, I have 3 sets of Fregate front & rear windscreens looking for a good home, bad home, bordello etc. Any takers?

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    1000+ Posts renault8&10's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon View Post
    On an Australian 1961 onwards Dauphine Gordini the amber front blinkers are standard, the parking lights were fitted to the headlamp, in the form of a separate bulb mounted to the plug that connects to the main (P45t base) headlamp globe. The parker bulb uses a hole in the base of the metal surround for the main headlamp globe to allow illumination. Unfortunately not all of the P45t base globes have the hole for the parker light any more, it is mainly a case of going to a patient old school auto electrician with a sample globe, who then sorts through their old 6 volt stock to find suitable globes with the parker hole. Or you can carefully drill a hole in the surround of the globe to allow the parker to illuminate.
    On my R8, I very carefully drilled a hole in the side of each headlight in an appropriate spot, then got an Edison globe holder from jaycar and after fitting suitable globes put them into the hole and sikaflexed them in. Fourteen years on and they’re still going strong on the original globes. The thought was if I every needed to change them, I could cut the sikaflex away and remove, then stick them back in.

    On the latest R8 project, I may use the same principle but this time I’ve found some rubber T5 globe holders on eBay that I recon will fit in like a grommet. And some yellow LED T5 globes
    KB


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