Windscreen Scratches
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! geodon's Avatar
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    Default Windscreen Scratches

    A new screen for my Dauphine is proving very hard to find so I want to explore if scratch removal technology has advanced in recent times.

    I have an arc on the driver's side that is the result of not replacing the wiper rubber in time.

    It will difficult to get a RWC as it sits in the driver's direct line of vision.

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    When cleaned up, I can't feel a depression when I drag a fingernail across it.

    Is it a DIY scenario? Or can anyone recommend a scratch removal operator?
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  2. #2
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Scratches are filled with a liquid that allegedly dries to match the refractive index of the original screen.

    I've seem wildly varying results. With the "repair" charges not necessarily commensurate with the quality of the repair.

    I'd look for a word of mouth referral.
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  3. #3
    Fellow Frogger! Dano's Avatar
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    In the past, I have used 000 steel-wool (The finest version, from memory) and a paste made up of talcum powder and Brasso. It worked fine on a similar scratch in an old Renault 10 screen. The father-in-law showed me how. He was an old school toolmaker, who used the pasted to polish the faces on the triangular wires used in the jig for the first XW Falcon tail-light lenses.

    Like anything, try a test area first to make sure you are happy with the result.

    Cheers

    Dano

    Edit: After thought. There is another product I seen used on some old louvre glass that was badly scratched. It is English whiting. It is also made into a paste. It is available from glaziers and good quality art suppliers like Eckerleys.

    https://www.eckersleys.com.au/products/whiting-powder
    Whiting Powder
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    Whiting Powder is used in the preparation of etching plates. It is made of ground calcium carbonate chalk and free from impurities. Mix with water to create a paste to degrease copper or zinc plates before applying ground or aquatinting. To remove tarnishes from plates, mix whiting powder with ammonia.


    http://www.polish-up.com.au/products/whiting-powder-vienne-lime-250-grams.htmlProduct

    Description


    Vienna Lime Cleaning Powder Or Whiting Powder
    Excellent for use with our polishing kits.
    Use this after you have finished polishing to remove grease and compound residues after polishing. Apply it to a clean lint free cloth and wipe where you've been polishing. Please note that Vienna Lime is not an actual lime powder but a pure form of super fine calcium carbonate (chalk).




    Last edited by Dano; 15th December 2017 at 08:34 PM.

  4. #4
    1000+ Posts Beano's Avatar
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    Default

    This is a subject that has been discussed previously, with a few different opinions. You might like to do a forum search. I seem to remember that there was no real consensus, and I do sometimes contemplate my buffing pad and my own windscreen.

    If it was myself, I would take it to a place that specialises in stainless steel polishing. They do great work and understand polishing with different grades of abrasive. The only problem is that the screen is still in the car, isn't it ? The last stainless polisher I saw was a guy with a respirator, in a room filled with fluff and crap from the polishing wheels. But there was very shiny metal there. He did bumper bars....

    But firstly, since it is not at all deep, give it a go yourself. Get a polishing buff attachment for your drill, made of lambswool (they can't cost much in Supercheap) , and use extra-cut polish. It's one step down (less abrasive) than cutting compound. Just persevere and use a fair bit of polish......
    Extra-cut won't be too abrasive, nor will it be not abrasive enough.

    If that doesn't work, start with cutting compound....then progress to extra-cut.. But by then, you may have spent half what you would pay some dude in a polishing shop to do it...

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts Fordman's Avatar
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    When I was an apprentice mechanic (wow, that was 50 years ago!) we used something called "Jeweller's Rouge" for polishing slight damage to the glass, ie, wiper scrape marks. It was a very fine abrasive paste, presumably what jeweller's used in their trade. I didn't use it much, but remember that it required a fair bit of elbow grease, probably easier these days with a small electric buffer.

    Cheers.
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  6. #6
    bob
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    G'day,

    Quote Originally Posted by Fordman View Post
    When I was an apprentice mechanic (wow, that was 50 years ago!) we used something called "Jeweller's Rouge" for polishing slight damage to the glass, ie, wiper scrape marks. It was a very fine abrasive paste, presumably what jeweller's used in their trade. I didn't use it much, but remember that it required a fair bit of elbow grease, probably easier these days with a small electric buffer.

    Cheers.
    yep, polishing the pivot points on clock balance wheels. Dad used to do it on the baby lathe, only took a minute or two to get a mirror finish on the hardened steel. Like boots, it was all spit 'n polish, wet the end of a stick [rather like a skewer with a flat end] pick up a bit rouge, and off you go. Could be wrong, but I think it was supplied like a block of soap as well as powder.

    cheers,
    Bob

  7. #7
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    Hi I have seen scratches polished from glass using a clay block and a buff.
    Marty

  8. #8
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    I would have thought that a potential problem with any polishing option would be having sufficiently even resultant depth for distortion-free vision.

    That said, & even if my fears are well-grounded, it might work well enough to look well enough for registration purposes. This would allow you limited use of the doaf whilst tracking down a replacement (good used?).

    cheers! Peter

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