Engine rebuild with FRM cylinder walls
  • Help
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger! b707's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    ACT Canberra
    Posts
    191

    Default Engine rebuild with FRM cylinder walls

    I am starting to do my research now as later in the year I plan to tackle an engine rebuild for the first time. The engine is a H22A4 from my Prelude. It is such a great engine (147kW, 2.2L, 7.5k redline). Unfortunately it has the typical problem that virtually all these engines have once past 150000km, excessive oil consumption past the piston rings. In my case 1L/500km, even higher if I drive it hard. So it would be nice to get it back to its former glory.

    So has anyone tackled an engine rebuild? Inparticular on an engine with Fibre Reinforced Metal (FRM) cylinder walls. I ask here as even on the Honda forums there is a lot of conflicting information on how to tackle the rehoning of these things.

    Anyway my plan is to just do the short block. I have been told to leave the head and valves alone unless there is an obvious problem. Should I still do the head and valves or get someone else to do it as I think this is a more complex job? I think I have all the tools I need including torque wrenches. Will have to purchase a piston ring compression tool, borrow an engine stand and engine lift. Plan to replace the T belt, balance belts and water pump while its out. Can anyone recommend a book or any resources they have used and any tools I havent considered? I know its a big job but I am keen to give it a go.

    Advertisement


    I have looked at second hand engines but due to the mileage I think they will have the same issues as my motor. Oh and the prices tend to be pricey, 1-2k for tired old donks. Any advice appreciatted.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_H_Engine

  2. #2
    1000+ Posts Beano's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    3,202

    Default

    If you have never done an engine rebuild before, my advice would be to leave this one to a person with experience with this particular type of engine. Someone with a proven track record of successful rebuilds. What is likely to happen if you do it is that you will make a mistake with one step of the process and have to then take everything apart and do it all again.

    Don't ask how I know this

    Rebuilds depend on doing every step correctly and only one done incorrectly will necessitate doing it all again.

    I would suggest starting with a simple engine, like a Peugeot 504, or series 1 505. Or an early overhead cam Jap engine.

    Have a quick chat with an engine reconditioner...preferably an old guy with loads of experience. They know all the tricks about how to get rings to seal properly.

  3. #3
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Newcastle
    Posts
    2,798

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beano View Post
    If you have never done an engine rebuild before, my advice would be to leave this one to a person with experience with this particular type of engine. -----
    Don't ask how I know this

    Rebuilds depend on doing every step correctly ------
    Have a quick chat with an engine reconditioner..---

    Hb707 Engine rebuild with FRM cylinder walls
    I am starting to do my research now --- Unfortunately it has the typical problem that virtually all these engines have once past 150000km, excessive oil consumption past the piston rings. In my case 1L/500km, --
    ------ there is a lot of conflicting information on how to tackle the rehoning of these things.

    Anyway my plan is to just do the short block. I have been told to leave the head and valves alone unless there is an obvious problem. Should I still do the head and valves or get someone else to do it as I think this is a more complex job? -----I know its a big job but I am keen to give it a go.

    I have looked at second hand engines----- Any advice appreciated.
    .
    Hi Hb707
    I have some experience but not of FRM cylinders. So I would have to look into that aspect before I would start. But I will give you some thoughts as I would think.
    What is the reason for the rebuild, be clear on that ! Before you put a spanner on an engine you should know almost certainly what it needs and what you are likely to need/do to it. The time to test it is while it is going and everthing working properly. No good looking at the bits on the bench and thinking perhaps that ?? was all it needed!
    So do the compression tests now. Cold and hot and wet and dry. Compare that to the factory book specs ( not the forum experts) Then evaluate these readings with help if necessary. Look at the plugs and evaluate them. New set of course and some long runs.
    If it is just burning oil only, then perhaps a change of oil specs to a synthetic heavier grade may be a sensible option. No work involved at all. Go another 50000 before work needed. My experience of top quality synthetic oil is it reduces oil use 'a lot'. It can cause oil seal leaks to increase. On that subject is the engine burning the oil or half is leaking. Check the parking area.
    I would not pull the head off an engine and not look at the valves. Never get a better time to reseat them. If it has been burning oil then a decoke will be in order. Also the valve stem seals need replacing.
    If the ring/bore are the oil problem then how to hone the bore is critical to bed in the new rings. A genuine Honda recommendation of the procedure would be my starting point, not forums. You do have a genuine manual ??
    I would agree with Beno that a simpler standard engine is a better bet to start with but fate does not always give you perfect options. Rebuild your lawn mower engine for a simple practice. Good luck.
    Jaahn

  4. #4
    Fellow Frogger! b707's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    ACT Canberra
    Posts
    191

    Default

    Hi Jaahn,

    Thanks for taking the time to write out a well considered post.

    Funnily enough I topped up the engine with Woollies stocked Gulf Western 15W50 and then Woollies brand 20W50 after the Vtec solenoid gasket failed and pumped pressurized oil out .By the time I noticed the problem, topped up the oil and nursed the thing home, it had used about 8L/50km, about twice the normal fuel consumption. Interestingly about 250 km later the dipstick still shows full with the 3.5L woollies top up (5 litre sump). So maybe the Woollies stuff is the go?

    Yes it leaks via the rear main seal (don't they all?). But that is miniscule compared to what is being burnt. I haven't done a compression test but the performance is great although I'm sure a few ponies have bolted over the years. The spark plugs look good, no noticeable smoke staining the rear or visible as I drive.

    Haha, as a teen my late dad helped me rebuild an old rover lawn mower with a B&S engine. I got the mower for free and used it to start a local lawn mowing service for old ladies and disabled people in my neighbour hood, so getting this thing going was a money spinner at the time. Unfortunately or fortunately a 3.5HPp 148cc B&S is a simpler proposition to a 200HP high revving Vtec unit. No big deal if you stuff up the B&S.

    Thanks for the post. Will certainly take your advice on board.
    Last edited by b707; 4th June 2017 at 08:00 PM.

  5. #5
    1000+ Posts Beano's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    3,202

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by b707 View Post
    The spark plugs look good, no noticeable smoke staining the rear or visible as I drive.
    I'd get a second or third opinion then before replacing the rings, especially given the previous symptoms.

  6. #6
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Newcastle
    Posts
    2,798

    Default

    Hi
    "Yes it leaks via the rear main seal (don't they all?). But that is miniscule compared to what is being burnt. I haven't done a compression test but the performance is great although I'm sure a few ponies have bolted over the years. The spark plugs look good, no noticeable smoke staining the rear or visible as I drive."

    You say it does not blow smoke and has no staining behind. But it is remarkable how a cat converter can burn off the oil in an old car. Of course this means the cat is probably clogged with ash. The time to evaluate the oil smoke is directly after a cold start, go out and drive it hard first up and look for smoke before the cat warms up. Short window.

    I think you must test it before deciding what to do. Most people IMHO make a decision first and then justify the job second. A good mechanic does it the right way round. I could tell you a couple of stories but not now !
    Jaahn

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •