Diesel particulate filters
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    Default Diesel particulate filters

    Hi everyone

    I know the current PSA diesels are adblue, and Renault still have traditional dpfs.

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    However I'm looking at some not so recent 308s and C4s. They're getting up there in age and I don't want to buy a diesel that will result in extra costs and/or problems.

    Anyone know when PSA went to adblue? And what they were like prior?

    Kind regards

    Chuck

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    Recent HDI engines only, after 2014, complying with Euro 6, use AdBlue. Earlier diesels use Eolys, and very old ones don't have particle filters.

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    Companies like Hyundai made DPFs only for markets that required them. In other words, a Hyundai diesel sold in England in 2014 had a PDF filter, but the same car sold in Australia did not. This changed in November 2016 when we went Euro 5 and they were fitted.

    Renault, in contrast, decided the one in, all in way was best. My 2008 Laguna III has (had) a PDF, whereas the 2007 Lag IIs with the same engine did not. So it looks like 2007 seemed to be the changeover date for Rennos; it may also be the time for the PSA twins due to Euro requirements.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 68 404 View Post
    Companies like Hyundai made DPFs only for markets that required them. In other words, a Hyundai diesel sold in England in 2014 had a PDF filter, but the same car sold in Australia did not. This changed in November 2016 when we went Euro 5 and they were fitted.

    Renault, in contrast, decided the one in, all in way was best. My 2008 Laguna III has (had) a PDF, whereas the 2007 Lag IIs with the same engine did not. So it looks like 2007 seemed to be the changeover date for Rennos; it may also be the time for the PSA twins due to Euro requirements.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckovski View Post
    Hi everyone

    I know the current PSA diesels are adblue, and Renault still have traditional dpfs.

    However I'm looking at some not so recent 308s and C4s. They're getting up there in age and I don't want to buy a diesel that will result in extra costs and/or problems.

    Anyone know when PSA went to adblue? And what they were like prior?

    Kind regards

    Chuck
    Peugeot have DPFs sorted even 308 and c4 vintage cars are well sorted most of these just plod along with no dramas at all it's mainly the company's that did that hit and miss style setups for different countries have issues don't forget psa have run them for around 17 years


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    Thanks all

    So far I understand:
    Renault pre2007 are DPF free
    PSA diesels even with DPF are generally ok

    Because... I'm looking at an auto that's comfortable on a 4hr trip that I will be making regularly from December this year, I have a car that I use to go to Sydney and back and sit in 1hr of traffic (auto, cheap, but not that comfortable and no cruise control) that I would not be able to do 4hrs on predominantly freeway km with. And whilst it has a small engine it's not that fuel efficient, probably because it only has 4 gears. Over a year I'd prefer better fuel consumption.

    I have a C4 grand Picasso that is perfect for the job but my wife and kids use that during the week (I can't tell you how good that car is!). I don't want them to use the crappy old car I've got. Besides, they may end up coming down with me from time to time and we'll need two cars.

    I thought about a current model eHDI C4 or a current model C5 but got worried about dpfs.

    Anyway, I might have a gander at the Laguna IIs!

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    Early, manual C4s had not FAP. EGS gained one and then there is also the 2.0HDi 6 speed auto C4.
    The FAP is generally only a problem for people doing many short trips.
    C5s are good value, but be selective. You can get a 2.0HDi with 6 speed auto and coil springs if you want a simpler model without spheres. Plenty of choice for a modest outlay.
    The Adblue / SCR system is in addition to the FAP using Eolys.
    Last edited by David S; 10th June 2017 at 12:45 AM.

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    The filter will regenerate during those long trips. It's ideal driving. DavidS's comment about C5s on steel springs (Attraction model) is a good one. Though not equal to hydraulic suspension, they are way ahead of most cars on springs for ride quality, and mechanically simpler. A similar car is the Peugeot 508, though only the top of the line 508s have double wishbones at the front.

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    A later 6 speed auto C5 with a variety of engines and specifications could be a worthwhile option for long trips. However, not everyone wants a diesel, and almost all of the C5 X7 series are diesel. So, while not to be confused with the earlier X7 2.0 EW10 petrol with AL4 gearbox versions, I recently drove a 2012 1.6 THP (i.e. EP6 turbo petrol) C5 in Exclusive specification. I was pleasantly surprised at how well it got along and how easy it was to live with in city traffic. Almost all of the EP6-engined C5s were the simpler model with coil springs and the manual handbrake etc., but this car had the same spheres and Exclusive equipment list as any 2.0HDi or 2.2HDi Exclusive, just with a smaller engine and lower price. The gearbox hustled through the low gears quite a bit when moving off, but it seemed like a lot of car for the $16K asking price with only 50K recorded and barely a mark on it. So, if you can be aware of and manage the possible EP6 issues sensibly, they are well worth a look.
    Last edited by David S; 10th June 2017 at 05:15 PM.

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    Thanks for more input. I'm a little lost with EP6 and FAP though...
    There was a great looking 2012 C5 exclusive petrol 1.6T for $10000 but it was literally in the middle of QLD. And sold by the time I thought about buying it 😪

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    French FAP = Filtre Particule. The manuals use this abbreviation.

    EP6 is a family of 4 cyl 1.6L petrol engines used mainly on small and mid-sized Peugeots and Citroens. There are turbocharged, direct-injected, high torque versions, which can be found in the GTI cars and in some "entry-level" Citroen C5s and Peugeot 508s. Not being diesels, there is no FAP.

    Personally, for a car that does long uninterrupted trips, I'd take a diesel. It's constant 1 mile city tripping that clogs filters. Long runs get them regenerated.

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    I have a 2.2 twin turbo HDi with a 6 speed auto. The filter gets clogged occasionally. If it does I just plant the foot and then it in sports mode for a 100 Ks. It's ok then. Only problem with the car has been rear suspension and maintenance of the gearbox due to towing. Awesome vehicle. Done 200000 and reckon it'll do that again. I change oil every 10k.

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    Driving it in sports mode alone and giving it some welly isn't going to help. I believe there are certain parameters that have to exist before a burn can happen. It has to be in 5th or 6th gear, over a certain speed (maybe 80km/h??), and maintained over 20 minutes or so. Otherwise it won't happen.

    I could be wrong. I normally am...

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    Or alternatively, don't buy a ducking diesel and do your fellow road users (especially the ones behind you) a favour.

    But if you like significantly increasing our cancer risk and a few bucks saved in fuel is more important than your health, then go for it I guess...
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdjones View Post
    I have a 2.2 twin turbo HDi with a 6 speed auto. The filter gets clogged occasionally. If it does I just plant the foot and then it in sports mode for a 100 Ks. It's ok then. Only problem with the car has been rear suspension and maintenance of the gearbox due to towing. Awesome vehicle. Done 200000 and reckon it'll do that again. I change oil every 10k.
    Shouldn't need 100km to regenerate. Sure, get a bit of heat into it with moderate revs, but my 2L 6sp finishes its regen cycle in 15 min or so.

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    100km x 100km/h fixes my dpf filter light up for about six months.....I've never paid anyone to fix the problem apart from the oil companies................
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

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    Quote Originally Posted by Haakon View Post
    Or alternatively, don't buy a ducking diesel and do your fellow road users (especially the ones behind you) a favour.

    But if you like significantly increasing our cancer risk and a few bucks saved in fuel is more important than your health, then go for it I guess...
    Well with the most recent PSA diesel's adblue dpf they claim the air coming out of the exhaust is cleaner than the air coming in through the front of the car! So it stops you from getting cancer...

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