Resurrecting a Goddess.......Twice - Page 4
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Thread: Resurrecting a Goddess.......Twice

  1. #76
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Quote Originally Posted by faulksy View Post
    I'm very tempted to replace the D-Jetronic with megasquirt or something similar but really wanted to see what shape the engine was in before reinventing the wheel. The biggest fear was that I'd go to through the whole exercise and then have to troubleshoot a 3rd party custom EFI setup on top of sorting the engine. Turns out the D-Jet system is amazingly robust. Since I've owned the car its been shorted out, burned, flooded and yet still works perfectly!

    https://youtu.be/0nRa7isdL8k

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    There's something to be said for German engineering! It's running a bit rough but no worse than it has since I've owned it. Seems to have a slight miss which occasionally caused some jerkiness while cruising. No idea what causes it and have replace or adjusted everything I can think of.

    The real draw of megasquirt is that it's almost plug and play with D-Jet.
    Faulksy. You’ve heard me say it before. Mega squirt and one less thing to go wrong. Combined with 123 it should run beautifully

  2. #77
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    Default Episode 18: The insulation game

    I decided to take a break from the oily bits over the last few weeks as I was a bit over being covered in LHM. Fortunately there are plenty of other jobs that need looking at with the next one being tidying up the interior. Following the fire, I ripped up all the carpet on the sills and pulled up the insulation on the front floor as there wasn't much of it left. This just left the insulation on the rear floor to pull up which turned out to still be wet and hiding puddles in the ribs of the floor. Unfortunately doing this also removed a lot of the paint leaving behind a patchwork or bare steel, aluminium foil, factory undercoat, black paint and glue. The thought of wirebrushing the floorpan brought back many painful memories of blisters and grazed knuckles from the first time I stripped it so I went hunting for a better solution. I'm sure many of you are familiar with flap wheels and the like but they were new to me and what a revelation they are.



    It took about 3 hours to remove all the old paint, a vast imporvement on the entire day it took last time. A liberal coating of rust converter saw to the remaining problem areas. It is really amazing how much the floors flex as you move across them. Stage 2 of the plan was brought into action and called for more of my old friend, black paint.



    That's better! I left the front floor alone as removing the old insulation didn't damage the paint underneath. A good clean with some solvent took care of the glue residue. As with the firewall the whole floor got a layer of heavy butyl matting. It's roughly equivalent to the bitumen mats originally used.



    Laying this stuff made a huge difference. The floor no longer acts like a giant bass drum giving only a dull thud when hit as opposed to a thunderous boom without the mats. The final layer is an acoustic foam made up of two layers with different densities laminated together. If nothing else it makes the floor more comfortable to sit on. hopefully it lives up to the claims made by the marketing team



    Just about ready for carpet which I have yet to order.
    gsowner84 and ramonm like this.

  3. #78
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    Fast work! I should be bringing my car back home (again) this weekend. It's been offsite for nearly 12 months while we've had building work done. With that nearly done and the car away, I've taken the opportunity to paint the garage walls and floor. So it is going to be a nicer working environment when the car is finally back. First job will be to strip and repaint the engine bay. Flap wheels are already purchased!
    1968 DS21bvh Pallas in Gris Palladium

    Restoration blog: https://ds-restoration.blogspot.co.uk

  4. #79
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    Default Episode 19: The Big Move

    I can't say stripping and painting the engine bay will be a lot of fun. 50 years worth of baked on LHM........

    Body work always looks a lot worse before it gets better. I'm currently in the process of dismantling all the panels for painting, the colour has yet to be decided.

    It's been a busy few weeks. All hydraulic systems have been restored to a functional state and by some minor miracle seem to be working as intended apart from an issue with the front suspension but more on that later. As well as that the car now has a new home occupying a corner of a workshop generously loaned by a club member. All the spare parts the have occupied the boot for the last 6 months had to be emptied and packed up for the trip. Having the car drivable made loading it onto a trailer a piece of cake. It wasn't till I drove it up the driveway to the workshop that I realised how out of adjustment the BHV system has gotten. Not entirely surprising seeing as every part has been rebuilt but it's another job to add to the list. Current plan of attack is to prepare the panels and send them off giving roughly a month to fit the new interior and sort the last few wiring / mechanical items before the panels come back.

    The warm weather last weekend seemed like the ideal time to fix the ruined dashboard. Since the fire I've accumulated 5 dashboards in varying states of completeness. Most of them are unusable for my car as they are from manual cars and the ignition is on the wrong side but between all of them there is enough plastic parts to build one complete dashboard. and now for the before shot



    The whole dash was covered in a tar like substance from the melted plastics and rubbers which had to be cleaned off to reveal the paint below.





    The whole panel was taken back to bare steel. By chance there was one other panel with the ignition on the left so it was prepped as well. I figured why not double the chances of getting a decent dashboard.



    After painting





    It came up really well, the trick i've found is to apply plenty of heat while the paint is drying otherwise the wrinkle effect can become patchy and uneven. Now to sort out all the plastic parts.....
    GreenBlood, Budge, ramonm and 2 others like this.

  5. #80
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    Nice. I'm sure I've seen a Youtube video where they do just that: they applied a heat gun after spraying the paint and the dashboard wrinkles suddenly magically appeared.
    1968 DS21bvh Pallas in Gris Palladium

    Restoration blog: https://ds-restoration.blogspot.co.uk

  6. #81
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    Looks great Faulksy !
    1974 DS23 ie Pallas 5 speed

  7. #82
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    Default Episode 20: All the Trimmings

    Ages ago back in April I took a road trip to visit Denton Christie at European Autocare in Penrith with the aim of obtaining an entire car's worth of Pallas trim. I figure seeing as the interior was ruined why not upgrade? The same thought occurred when the car was first being put together but there is no point making a Pallas unless you can do it properly with all the pieces. To that end, I roped in a mate and a mad road trip was planned. We ended up driving to Penrith, crawling over many wrecks and driving back to Melbourne in just over a day. It was worth it though




    There are approximately 60 extra pieces of trim on a Pallas and it took many hours to fight them off the wrecks. Go knows what Citroen made the screws from but they were to rusty to unscrew and yet drill bits got nowhere the trying to drill them out. Seeing as most of the trim is fitted to holes that don't currently exist on my car a bunch of holes needed to be drilled before it goes for paint.



    The interior trim was easy as the trim itself can be used as a template. The exterior ones required running masking tape down the panels and painstakingly measuring the location of every hole. There is supposed to be 96 or so just for the thin trims at the top and bottom of each panel. The only things I haven't been able to source are a set of reflectors, interior light lenses and C pillar trim with the DS badge instead of the pallas badge. If anyone out there can help, give me a shout.

    The car is now devoid of all bodywork and the panels are off at the painter being taken back to bare metal.
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  8. #83
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    I'm not looking forward to putting my pallas trim back on. Luckily, that's a long way off! As well as a few details inside, there are some other Pallas bits outside - such as the chromed boot lid hinges and a chromed boot lid knob - did you get those as well or are you not fussed?
    1968 DS21bvh Pallas in Gris Palladium

    Restoration blog: https://ds-restoration.blogspot.co.uk

  9. #84
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    I'm sort of hoping fitting the trim will be a lot easier than removing it. The boot lid finger pull was chrome plated on my car when it came to me. It could just be an export market fitment or all standard DS got chrome ones while ID had to make do with polished aluminium. On that note, I'll stick with the polished aluminium boot hinges, they can always be chromed later. Can't wait to start putting it all back together, shiny stainless and black leather should make a pretty nice combo!

  10. #85
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    To those follow this saga,
    I am restoring another car in the same garage where faulksy has his Citroen. The speed/quailty of rebuild is amazing considering where he started from...i.e. a barbeque.
    Blueduck (aka Ian Downie)
    1974 Citroen D Special with DS21i.e. engine and 5 speed gearbox
    MGB GT V8 B.... bullet--proof and great fun
    Jaguar e-type roadster ... on the way from US of A

  11. #86
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    Default Episode 21: Let there be light!

    It's been a bit of a mission but 220m, yes you read that right, (750ft) of wire later and the car now has brand new wiring front to back. The final task was to make up the rear loom which completes almost a full lap of the car. Here it is laid out on the floor next to a GS!


    Colour coding all the ends took ages, not helped by the fact I had aparently used two different wiring diagrams at some point and put the wrong colours on. The new bullets seem much more strudy than the original ones, time will tell...


    Running the wiring in the sill is tedious to say the least. Access to the brackets is restricted by the bundle of hydraulic lines that also run down the passenger side. Now for the last great unknown.....Does it all work?

    Connecting all the switches, lights and sensors up brought the warning lights to life so that was a good sign. However turning the headlight switch produced some very weird results. No matter which way it was turned, pushed and pulled a random combination of lights came on, even an indicator at one point! checking the grounds and other connections revealed everything to be in order and left me wondering how I'd managed to stuff it up that badly. Working on a hunch that the switch might be buggered I directly connected the switch outputs to +12 and to my surprise all the lights worked properly. Putting a meter across the switch proved it was not behaving so time to do some digging.


    For those playing at home, black is +12, mauve is the parking lamps, green is low beam, yellow is high beam and red is the driving lamps. Without a relay for the high beams there would be 220W of power being drawn through the yellow wire! There is a reason I doubled the wire gauge for the headlights when building the new looms.

    Drilling out the 4 brass rivets that hold the switch together released several springs and brass plates which all had to be picked up off the floor and accounted for. The switching action is achieved by rotating a brass plate across several contacts embedded in the back cover of the housing.

    The square plastic part is what provides the notches. There is a small spring loaded pin on one side which is what activates the driving lamp switch.





    The push switch for the driving lamps is very similar to the mechanism in a retractable pen.


    It all looked brand new inside so I assumed something had gotten out of alignment. Reassembly is achieved through a careful balancing act requiring three hands. Not feeling overly confident the switch was plugged back in and amazingly worked perfectly! Even the indicators worked.





    Feeling somewhat pleased, I decided to quit while ahead and call it a night. Next up, upholstery........
    Last edited by faulksy; 13th November 2019 at 12:31 AM.

  12. #87
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    Nice post Faulksy. I'm sure there are a lot of folks curious to see what's in those switches.

    It will be interesting to see how you get on with those connectors too. Presumably the tags on trends are available in enough different colours to replicate the Citroen colour-coding scheme?
    1968 DS21bvh Pallas in Gris Palladium

    Restoration blog: https://ds-restoration.blogspot.co.uk

  13. #88
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    Thanks Paul. I was a bit surprised at how simple the internals were given Citroen's penchant for over engineering everything. For the more ambitious out there, the circular driving lamp symbol can be prised out to reveal the fixing for the knob allowing it to be removed and the stalk rechromed.





  14. #89
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    I'm going down a similar route with my earlier style stalks. I thought about re-chroming, but instead i'm going to mix and match stalks, knobs and bodies from the various bits and pieces I have.

    Dashboard stalks dismantled.JPG
    1968 DS21bvh Pallas in Gris Palladium

    Restoration blog: https://ds-restoration.blogspot.co.uk

  15. #90
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    That's brave taking all those switches apart Paul. I don't envy you having to chase up dashboard parts for a '68

  16. #91
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    The parts were used between 62 and 68 so are not that hard to find. I've got a few spare bits and bobs tucked away. i think there is more completion for the 69 to 75 parts and so higher prices so I'm sure you efforts to press things back into use will be well received.
    1968 DS21bvh Pallas in Gris Palladium

    Restoration blog: https://ds-restoration.blogspot.co.uk

  17. #92
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    Default Episode 22: One Year On

    So, It's just over a year since the fire and I think it's time to see where things are at. The hydraulics have been rebuilt and brought back to life, new wiring has been laid front to back, the frame has been stripped cleaned and painted, new insulation all around the cabin and panel work has started. Since the last update there have been many discussions with the panel beater about the sorry state of the panels I supplied him. Turns out under the paint was more rust damage than anyone had thought with the rear passenger door being the worst of them all.



    Not exactly a show winning repair. We decided it would be more economical to source some better panels rather than repair. Meanwhile the upholstery saga is taking over my living room with bits of seat everywhere. It is worth it though as the results are pretty good. Heres a bit of before and after.




    A fair bit of adjustment with new foam was required to get the covers fitting nicely. They seem to have been made slightly to big, either that or the 50 year old foam has shrunk more that I'd expect. a final bit of assembly and they can go back in. If you've ever wondered why there is a piece of wire sewn into the bottom edge of the front seat bases here is the answer. It needs to be pulled tight to pull the front corners in to follow the curve properly.





    The dashboard is once more taking price of place in the interior. It still needs a few more of the silver trims to be redone but is otherwise finished.


    The cabin blowers and windscreen wipers were the last electrical items to be sorted. Fixing the blowers ended up being a mission as they had to be totally dismantled to free the motors. Incidentally, the motors spin in opposite directions. I discovered this when swapping the motor out of a drivers side blower into the heater blower and wondered why no air was coming out of the vent.




    The wipers were a bigger problem. I have a replacement switch from a wreck but the stalk is rusty and the plastic has turned a nasty shade of green. This lead me to order a NOS one from Europe but here in lies the problem. I connected up the switch and found that the motor only had one speed. Double checking the wiring revealed all was wired properly and yet it refused to work. A post on here from some time back gave a hint in suggesting the LDH and RHD switches are different and incompatible but the posters had no idea what was different about them. To make things more confusing, none of the factory wiring diagrams match the 3 wire bosch motor fitted to most AUS spec cars. Putting a meter across the switches gave a hint as to the difference but they still made no sense. The only consistency seemed to be that the black wire was the power input to the switch.


    When taken apart the difference is immediately apparent. The LHD (top in photo) switch connects the white and blue wires together in the off position then black to blue and finally black to red for the 2 wiper speeds. The RHD switch connects red and blue together in the off position then black to blue and red and finally black to blue for the 2 wiper speeds. The challenge is how to bridge power between the wires on the LHD switch for the 2 speeds. Enter 2 7A diodes as it turns out the unloaded motor draws 3.5A. One between the red and blue and the other between the white and red to get the auto park working.








    The diodes are the black blocks inserted into the connectors. Not a very elegant mounting method but for now it works. With that sorted the I think I can call the electrics finished! Enough for now, till the next one.....




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  18. #93
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    As a side note, anyone who wants larger versions of the photos can get them from here

    https://www.flickr.com/gp/[email protected]/uDZ77W

    There's images there going all the way back to when I first bought the car and rebuilt it the first time.
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  19. #94
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    Thanks Faulksy. Someone in the UK was recently asking about a replacement light stalk and found that they are different from the European ones. I pointed him to your post no.92, though I don't know whether he is confident enough to pull his apart to find out why it's stopped working.
    1968 DS21bvh Pallas in Gris Palladium

    Restoration blog: https://ds-restoration.blogspot.co.uk

  20. #95
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    The switch isn't so bad to take apart, drill the top off the rivets and you're done. Unlike the headlight switch there aren't a whole lot of parts to fall out besides a spring and ball bearing which gives the detents. If there isn't 12V on the black wire then that would explain why it's not working. Could also be the ground wire connecting the motor body to earth has given up.

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