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Thread: Resurrecting a Goddess.......Twice

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by faulksy View Post
    Thanks Paul, I'm glad someone is finding this interesting. I've been reading through your blog a fair bit to rebuild the hydraulic components and cylinder head.

    Hi Faulksy,

    You can be sure that many of us find these posts extremely interesting and the photos even more so. The various restoration threads and similar threads elsewhere on AF are such a great resource when we get down and dirty on our own cars.

    Keep up the great work and I think you definitely deserve an OAM - Order of Aussiefrogs Medal for sheer persistence, plus I can't believe how much you get done in a very short time. I must be the slowest self-directed mechanic in Australia, it seems to take forever to get stuff done here.

    regards leconte

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  2. #52
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    Thanks Leconte. Some weeks it feels like nothing has happened and then suddenly a whole bunch of work happens.

    As promised, here is a guide for taking apart the much maligned auxiliary air valve. For such a simple unit, it cops a lot of stick from most people who own an injected DS and rightly so. It is prone to jamming fully open, fully closed and anywhere in between. In addition it can leak coolant into the inlet airways and down the side of the engine.

    Its mode of failure is pretty easy to determine based on what problem the car is having. Jammed open will allow to much air into the engine once it has warmed up causing the engine to rev up to 1800ish RPM, hit the idle rev limiter and drop back to 900ish rpm endlessly. Jammed closed will make the car hard to start on cold mornings without giving the accelerator a boot full once the engine catches. Leaking coolant into the engine is pretty rare but could happen with the associated consequences. It lives on the side of the engine roughly where the pressure regulator would be and is pretty much impossible to see through the tangle of EFI wiring, fuel hoses and air hoses. With everything in place this is what you get



    It's roughly in the space between the no. 2 & 3 inlet runners. Digging a bit deeper reveals the unit.



    It's fixed into a bracket on the side of the block and is held in place one nut on top and bottom. I've found deep drive sockets to be the best option as the studs are rather long. Without all the hoses the unit looks like this



    On the left is usually where the sender for the temperature warning light is fitted. The two left ports connect to coolant lines and the two right ports connect to air lines. The two halves are bolted together with a gasket to ensure a watertight seal. The right side housing the air slide valve is that part the causes the problems. The hole unit is pressed together and gives no clues about how to dismantle. As you'll see in a bit, the port on the end is part of a much larger machined sleeve. I'm borrowing this image from another thread here to show how the two halves come apart. Even separated the right side is a sealed unit.



    There are various suggestions on other forums on how to get it apart ranging from smashing the brass bulb with a hammer to force the end out to using complicated and very expensive pullers. I decided on a slightly different approach. Set 1 is to run an 11mm tap down the hose barb on the far right end. Make sure that you tap the full length of the hose barb other wise it will snap off in the next step. There is plenty of room inside to run the tap into past the hose barb.

    For the next part you'll need a 25mm deep socket. The deep part is important as you'll see in a minute. Grap an M11 bolt and a couple of nuts, make sure the bolt is long enough to screw all the way down past the bottom of the hose barb. The aim is for the large flat section at the bottom of the barb to take most of the force not the barb which will snap off.



    Using the old two spanner trick wind the bottom nut against the socket to pull the sleeve out of the housing. .



    The top 5mm are ever so slightly wider then the rest of the part which is what holds the whole thing together. With the sleeve and piston out of the way you can put a socket into the bore and tap out the boss holding the thermo element. There's not much inside. They work much like a thermostat. Wax in the brass bulb expands and pushes the piston against the spring closing the stepped opening in the side of the sleeve eventually cutting off air flow.

    .

    I found the inside of the sleeve was very rough. The edge of the piston isn't chamfered so the sharp edge digs into the sleeve and the whole thing jams. The problem is worsened by any dirt that gets pulled into the unit. A quick and very light sanding with some 1200 grit paper sorted the sleeve and a bit of light filing took the edge off the piston. The thermo elements can die and putting it into some boiling water will soon show if it needs replacing. It only moves about 10mm and is pressed into the boss at the bottom of the unit.

    To reassemble use a vice or similar to press the thermo element back in. Then insert the piston and spring and then the sleeve. Press the whole unit together until the sleeve hits the bottom of the bore. Place the thermo element into nearly boiling water to confirm the unit works. It should be fully closed at about 75deg.
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  3. #53
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    Episode 16: Sorting the BVH system part 1

    Because of where the fire started and burned hottest all of the components of the BHV system bore the full brunt of the blaze. Given the system was still holding pressure a couple of days after the fire I rather hoped the components had escaped relatively unscathed as I didn't fancy trying to find replacements. If you dig into the parts catalogues, IE cars have different parts fitted to the standard production cars. There are very few IE BVH cars in Australia as fuel injection was first offered in late 1969 and the BVH was banned under the ADRs in 1971 giving a very small window to import one. Add to this the cost of the fuel injection and it's not surprising there aren't many here.

    First up was the Clutch Re-engagement Control. A fun little device that modulates the clutch engagement speed based on throttle position. It also has two secondary functions. With the selector in neutral, it limits how far the throttle can be opened making it impossible to rev the car higher than about 1200 rpm. Its final job is to close the throttle during gear changes allowing the driver to keep their foot planted on the accelerator and maintain relatively smooth shirting. On an IE car it lives on the inlet manifold over the exhaust. There is usually a drip tray and heat shield under it to give a bit of protection or in my case, start a fire.



    The one that I took off the car was blackened to a crisp and the shaft was seized suggesting it had gotten very hot. Dismantling is very similar to taking apart the pressure regulator and was pretty painless until I had to get the slide valve out. After trying all manner of options I had to resort to a drift and sledge hammer........clearly this unit was finished. There was no corrosion on the piston or bore so something has warped internally.


    I had to visit Denton Christie in Penrith about some other parts and he gave me free reign on the parts cars. One of which happened to be a DS21 IE still possessing most of the parts.



    Take 2, following in the footsteps of Paul Restoration of a 1968 Citroen DS21bvh Pallas: CRC Unit (Clutch Re-engagement Control) - Strip Down and Overhaul the unit was quickly stripped down ready for cleaning



    There are a couple of differences to the standard unit. The mounts and pipework, there is no flow restricting ball bearing and spring and the springs inside are supposedly different. The new seals were easy to install with the biggest challenge being getting the adjuster to grab the key and start winding it in. Of interest was that on this unit the adjuster was wound in 18 turns whereas on the original on it was wound in 13 turns. I reset it to 18 as the car it cam off apparently drove just fine so we shall see.
    Last edited by faulksy; 2nd September 2019 at 01:27 PM.

  4. #54
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    Well done! The trickiest part I found was the smaller two-part slide valve with the spring in between. very difficult to align before the sealing cap goes back on..... 'Locking' the rotating shaft against it's spring action isn't tricky, but it's possible to lock it in the wrong position (i.e. pin not in the locking hole but just against the cam).

    Regards
    Paul
    1968 DS21bvh Pallas in Gris Palladium

    Restoration blog: https://ds-restoration.blogspot.co.uk

  5. #55
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    That slide valve was somewhat fiddly to reassemble, trial and error finally got there though. I had considered replacing both the springs but decided removing the shaft and cam to be one step to far in an effort to minimise interference with the factory settings.The hope is that it will all go back together and just work. I was slightly surprised at the state of the o-rings in the seal plate, they were completely deformed and blocked. It's a wonder the thing worked at all.

  6. #56
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    Episode 15: Progress Report

    To many things have happened in the last 2 weeks to sensibly split them out so here goes.

    The new EFI loom went in and each component was checked against the manual to make sure it was all working. During the tests I found that I had incorrectly wired the impulse relay but that was soon fixed. Safe in the knowlege that all the components tested ok I felt safe to connect the ECU and begin testing. After being burned and flooded there was no guarrantee the ECU would even power up let alone work particularly as I had to desolder the resistor bank at the top of the photo to get all the water out. The scary thing is, there is no way for the average Joe to test an ECU beyond putting power to it and seeing if the pump runs.


    Low and behold plugging it in and turning the key caused the pump to run and opening the throttle produces the requisite 20 clicks from the injectors, both good signs. I also had to install a NOS manifold vacuum sensor which cropped up on ebay for just over $100 AUD as the original on was full of water and cactus. Not bad going given they usually start at 500 EUR for untested ones from a field. Given it was dead I decided to open it, not something that should normally be done.




    The rust is from the iron core of the transformer and armature. I might reinstall it later and see what happens.

    I ended up chasing my tail around the engine for 2 weeks trying to figure out why it wouldn't start. Checking all the usual things like points and such turned up no answers and the starter motor had to be sent off for rebuilding. It came back looking brand new and turns over about 5 times faster than it used to. Still no life from the engine. I did get it running on 2 cylinders briefly one afternoon but sadly that trick was not to be repeated. I concluded that the ECU must be damaged and tracked down a mob in Melbourne who can test and repair them. It passed every test with flying colours somewhat annoyingly as it meant the problem was elsewhere. A chance discovery revealed that the points were sticking and not following the cam properly. A new set was installed and it fired into life!

  7. #57
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    Episode 16: Sorting The BVH system part 2

    With the engine running it's time to sort the rest of the hydraulics. Seeing as I still had many pipe connections undone I left the regulator bleed screw undone to limit the amount of fluid that could flow further back into the system.

    Next on the hit list is the centrifugal regulator. Once more Citroen throws a spanner in the works by specifying a different part for EFI cars. I believe the difference is the springs on the governor but details are thin on the ground. Interestingly, how many would have guessed that fuel injected DS21s got the same sodium filled valves as the SM? The centrifugal regulator is what gives a BVH car the ability to creep like an automatic. As engine revs rise from the slow idle to the fast idle the governor acts on a slide valve letting progressively more fluid return from the clutch slave to the tank and brings the clutch up to the biting point. With everything set up properly the car will now creep forward or backward depending on gear. It should also stop the car rolling back on hill starts.



    It comes apart into three assemblies, the centrifugal governor, clutch slide valve and anti stall device. For a change there are very few parts inside. The two nuts on the right are in fact two studs that hold the two castings together. Undoing them reveals a spring and piston.



    There are 3 bolts that hold the front casing on which need to be undone to get at the slide valve the governor bears on.




    The front bearing seemed fine so I left the governor well alone. There are only 2 seals to be replaced in the unit, one where the front casing joins the centre section and one for the main piston. The anti stall piston at the rear relies on a paper gasket to seal the backplate. They're all very easy to get at and replace.



    Cleaned and reassembled. You can see the slide valve on the cloth at the top. The new silent blocs were a proper pain the install. The tolerance is very small and they require a huge amount of force to press in. With that done, the governor can go back on and the unit is ready to be reinstalled on the engine.

  8. #58
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    Nice one. Accepting that there is a ring seal inside the bore, des the (anti-stall) piston at the back end of yours move freely? I have two regulators (one of which is rebuilt for my car) and on both the pistons are extremely tight in the bore. It would take a fair amount of pressure to move the piston against it's spring. I suspect the pistons may be too tight.....

    I'm not sure whether they are meant to slide gradually and smoothly/ easily under low/building pressure - for example when you gradually slow down - or whether they are meant to generally offer resistance but then move fast and suddenly to prevent a stall - like when you do an emergency stop. Any idea?
    1968 DS21bvh Pallas in Gris Palladium

    Restoration blog: https://ds-restoration.blogspot.co.uk

  9. #59
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    It was a couple of weeks ago I was doing this but from memory the piston was stiff but moved freely. I think the anti stall piston is only meant to operate in an emergency stop. If you jam your foot onto the brakes the spool valves will fully open and have the potential to put the full system pressure of 150bar (2500 PSI give or take) into the front brake circuit. Rear brake pressure never gets that high as the suspension circuits feeding them run at a lower pressure.

    I think under normal circumstances, it is the drop in engine RPM that will cause declutching via the governor.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by faulksy View Post
    It was a couple of weeks ago I was doing this but from memory the piston was stiff but moved freely. I think the anti stall piston is only meant to operate in an emergency stop. If you jam your foot onto the brakes the spool valves will fully open and have the potential to put the full system pressure of 150bar (2500 PSI give or take) into the front brake circuit. Rear brake pressure never gets that high as the suspension circuits feeding them run at a lower pressure.

    I think under normal circumstances, it is the drop in engine RPM that will cause declutching via the governor.
    Thanks for your thoughts faulksy. I guess the principle is that, in an emergency stop, that back piston compresses against its spring (or does it move the other way?) . In doing so, it creates more room (less room?) in the body of the regulator and the slide valve that controls the feed to the clutch moves (one way or the other!) and disengages the clutch independently of the governor? Something like that.....

    So presumably the piston should not be so stiff that the big spring cannot 'reset' it after an emergency stop?
    1968 DS21bvh Pallas in Gris Palladium

    Restoration blog: https://ds-restoration.blogspot.co.uk

  11. #61
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    This might give you a better idea of how it works. Pressure from the front brakes forces the piston back against its spring allowing the main slide valve to connect the clutch slave to the high pressure supply to disengage it. The spring needs to return the piston to its resting position against the end of the bore to put the governor back in change of the clutch. You can bench test it otherwise you'll need to perform an emergency stop to confirm its operation. I've only had to do it once in 4th gear and was a little surprised to find the engine still happily purring away as though nothing had happened.

    - Michael

  12. #62
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    Thanks. That's the key point isn't it: the piston should not be so stiff in it's bore that the big spring cannot return it to it's normal position after an emergency stop. I think I need to investigate mine further.....
    1968 DS21bvh Pallas in Gris Palladium

    Restoration blog: https://ds-restoration.blogspot.co.uk

  13. #63
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    You could try pressing on the pushrod between the two halves and see if the spring is strong enough to return the piston.

  14. #64
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    Episode 17: BVH Woes

    The last part of the BVH system to receive some attention is the gear selector or "brain" as some call it. From the outside it doesnt look like much but internally there is a lot going on. Rebuilding one is covered operation DX 334-3 of manual 518 but there are a few traps in that the photos don't seem to match the text which seems to be a common problem with manual 518. Armed with teh manual it's time to break out the spanners.


    Getting it off the car wasn't to bad as the steering column and exhaust manifolds were out of the way giving easier access to the set of 5 pipes that run down to the gearbox. What you see in the pic above is the side normally facing the wing and the underside. Undoing the end cover reveals a set of springs and to my surprise nice clean LHM. I was sort of expecting the thing to be seized internally given its proximity to the fire.



    With all the covers off the various pistons and valves can be removed. The gear selector slide valve is the most important not to damage. There are no seals anywhere on it relying solely on the fine machining tolerance to seal.


    The slide valve itself is hollow and plugged at both ends. LHM is fed via the gearchange speed regulator into the valve through 2 small holes on the left hand end, one is just visible in the photo. Rotating the valve in the bore aligns each of the high pressure outlets with an outlet port supply pressure to a slave piston and the clutch controls. The high pressure outlets are the small holes on the top right. The large groves in the face are for fluid being returned from the slave pistons. The alignment of the slide valve within the bore is handled by the gear selector leaver in the dashboard, without it attached the slide valve doesn't have anything to keep it in place. Alignment of the valve with the selector is achieved by inserting a 4mm pin into the alignment hole which is handily located on the underside of the unit and must be found by feel. A drill bit does the job although I had to break 2cm off the end to fit it into the car.




    It is at this point I ran into the first problem. Because the gear selector was directly in the path of the fire as it burnt through the dashboard, all the plastic parts including the start switch were gone and the unit had seized solid. By chance one cropped up on ebay in France and i snapped it up as nobody I talked to hear knew of a wreck with one still attached. Bolting it to the selector everything looked fine.



    However sliding it all into the dashboard revealed a problem. The manual clutch control lever wouldn't clear the edge of the dashboard, clearly something was wrong. Checking the parts book showed CItroen were up to their usual trick of same same but not. Spot the difference......

    For whatever reason the gear selector on an EFI car is 30mm longer than a carby car. This meant I now had to dismantle them to swap parts. The important parts to swap were the chrome lever the stick out of the steering column, starter switch and manual clutch control lever. The whole thing does come apart but it relies on being able to slide the drum roughly in the centre of the thing off the shaft. On both it was properly stuck.


    Back in the dashboard ready for testing. Most of the new wiring is also in and seems to be working! One final step was needed before testing, cleaning the LHM tank. There was still some LHM in it but a lot of rubbish has mode its way in there as well including a few litres of water that killed off the freshly rebuilt pump that was on the car. It sat full of water for a month and resulted in 6 of the 7 pistons being jammed. This is what came out of the tank after shaking some petrol in there....




    5 litres of fresh LHM and we're ready to see if there is life in the hydraulics! I think with that this blog is now up to the present, watch this space.

  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by faulksy View Post
    Episode 17: BVH Woes

    The last part of the BVH system to receive some attention is the gear selector or "brain" as some call it. From the outside it doesnt look like much but internally there is a lot going on. Rebuilding one is covered operation DX 334-3 of manual 518 but there are a few traps in that the photos don't seem to match the text which seems to be a common problem with manual 518. Armed with teh manual it's time to break out the spanners.


    Getting it off the car wasn't to bad as the steering column and exhaust manifolds were out of the way giving easier access to the set of 5 pipes that run down to the gearbox. What you see in the pic above is the side normally facing the wing and the underside. Undoing the end cover reveals a set of springs and to my surprise nice clean LHM. I was sort of expecting the thing to be seized internally given its proximity to the fire.



    With all the covers off the various pistons and valves can be removed. The gear selector slide valve is the most important not to damage. There are no seals anywhere on it relying solely on the fine machining tolerance to seal.


    The slide valve itself is hollow and plugged at both ends. LHM is fed via the gearchange speed regulator into the valve through 2 small holes on the left hand end, one is just visible in the photo. Rotating the valve in the bore aligns each of the high pressure outlets with an outlet port supply pressure to a slave piston and the clutch controls. The high pressure outlets are the small holes on the top right. The large groves in the face are for fluid being returned from the slave pistons. The alignment of the slide valve within the bore is handled by the gear selector leaver in the dashboard, without it attached the slide valve doesn't have anything to keep it in place. Alignment of the valve with the selector is achieved by inserting a 4mm pin into the alignment hole which is handily located on the underside of the unit and must be found by feel. A drill bit does the job although I had to break 2cm off the end to fit it into the car.




    It is at this point I ran into the first problem. Because the gear selector was directly in the path of the fire as it burnt through the dashboard, all the plastic parts including the start switch were gone and the unit had seized solid. By chance one cropped up on ebay in France and i snapped it up as nobody I talked to hear knew of a wreck with one still attached. Bolting it to the selector everything looked fine.



    However sliding it all into the dashboard revealed a problem. The manual clutch control lever wouldn't clear the edge of the dashboard, clearly something was wrong. Checking the parts book showed CItroen were up to their usual trick of same same but not. Spot the difference......

    For whatever reason the gear selector on an EFI car is 30mm longer than a carby car. This meant I now had to dismantle them to swap parts. The important parts to swap were the chrome lever the stick out of the steering column, starter switch and manual clutch control lever. The whole thing does come apart but it relies on being able to slide the drum roughly in the centre of the thing off the shaft. On both it was properly stuck.


    Back in the dashboard ready for testing. Most of the new wiring is also in and seems to be working! One final step was needed before testing, cleaning the LHM tank. There was still some LHM in it but a lot of rubbish has mode its way in there as well including a few litres of water that killed off the freshly rebuilt pump that was on the car. It sat full of water for a month and resulted in 6 of the 7 pistons being jammed. This is what came out of the tank after shaking some petrol in there....




    5 litres of fresh LHM and we're ready to see if there is life in the hydraulics! I think with that this blog is now up to the present, watch this space.
    Thanks for all of this. I've yet to tackle my gear brain rebuild and this will be very helpful reference. I'm dying to find out how you get on with the next step. Was that starter switch on Ebay or another site?
    1968 DS21bvh Pallas in Gris Palladium

    Restoration blog: https://ds-restoration.blogspot.co.uk

  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by faulksy View Post
    Episode 15: Progress Report

    To many things have happened in the last 2 weeks to sensibly split them out so here goes.

    The new EFI loom went in and each component was checked against the manual to make sure it was all working. During the tests I found that I had incorrectly wired the impulse relay but that was soon fixed. Safe in the knowlege that all the components tested ok I felt safe to connect the ECU and begin testing. After being burned and flooded there was no guarrantee the ECU would even power up let alone work particularly as I had to desolder the resistor bank at the top of the photo to get all the water out. The scary thing is, there is no way for the average Joe to test an ECU beyond putting power to it and seeing if the pump runs.


    Low and behold plugging it in and turning the key caused the pump to run and opening the throttle produces the requisite 20 clicks from the injectors, both good signs. I also had to install a NOS manifold vacuum sensor which cropped up on ebay for just over $100 AUD as the original on was full of water and cactus. Not bad going given they usually start at 500 EUR for untested ones from a field. Given it was dead I decided to open it, not something that should normally be done.




    The rust is from the iron core of the transformer and armature. I might reinstall it later and see what happens.

    I ended up chasing my tail around the engine for 2 weeks trying to figure out why it wouldn't start. Checking all the usual things like points and such turned up no answers and the starter motor had to be sent off for rebuilding. It came back looking brand new and turns over about 5 times faster than it used to. Still no life from the engine. I did get it running on 2 cylinders briefly one afternoon but sadly that trick was not to be repeated. I concluded that the ECU must be damaged and tracked down a mob in Melbourne who can test and repair them. It passed every test with flying colours somewhat annoyingly as it meant the problem was elsewhere. A chance discovery revealed that the points were sticking and not following the cam properly. A new set was installed and it fired into life!
    check the lower set of points in the dizzie if it ran on two cylinders. They should cycle open and closed at the calculators plug when you crank the motor. I strongly suggest checking all of the capacitors inside the calculator too. if they are even slightly bulging at the top, replace them!
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  17. #67
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    The selector wasn't that bad to rebuild all things considered. The worst part was getting the seals for the automatic clutch control pistons out. The 4th one is a long way down the bore and there is very little room to wield a tool. I ended up bending the end of a flat blade screwdriver and sharpening it with a file to cut through the old seals and leaver them out.

    You've probably already seen these but I'd suggest looking at citrothello's page https://citrothello.net/blog/remise-...draulique-lhm/

    and HD19 Épisode 41

    The starter switch is not a spare part anyone remakes. It is riveted onto the gear selector housing and I would be very careful if you're going to remove it being 50 year old plastic. The rivets have a conical head and are punched from the underside. By coincidence the same screws that hold the door catches on are the right size to replace the rivets. By sheer fluke, a whole selector assembly cropped up on ebay back in February not long after the fire. I had anticipated it being one of the hardest parts to replace but there you go. It's the only one I've ever seen come up. Citroen Classics or the usual suspects should be able to find one.



    Getting the chrome lever off requires you to take out the lower pin, pull the lever past 2nd and rotate so the hinge point is at the top and rotate the housing all the way round past 4th gear. Probably doesn't make much sense now but it will when you do it. The aim is to rotate the lever off the selector shaft. There are 2 spring loaded ball bearings for the detentes, watch out for the left/right one as it will probably fire itself across the room.


  18. #68
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    Thanks Shane. I ended up swapping in a brand new set of trigger points and got the same result, 2 cylinders and wouldn't rev past 1000rpm. Measuring the pins at the plug confirmed they were working fine indicating the problem was elsewhere. The next time I tried it wouldn't fire at all.

    A new set of ignition points caused it to cough into life on all 4 cylinders with the aid of some start ya bastard. Adjusting the distributor brought the idle from barely running to a smoothish 1500 RPM. Way to high I know but I had to wind out the idle screw a long way to keep the thing running while adjusting the timing. It now starts first time every time as if the last 6 months hadn't happened!

    There is only 2 electrolytic capacitors in the whole ECU, the two silver rectangles on the right. The rest are mylar, ceramic or polystyrene which don't fail in quite the same way as electrolytics. Granted after 50 years they have all probably drifted somewhat from their stated values but the only real way to test is to remove each one from the board, capacitance being the funny thing that it is. The test report I got back shows its pretty damn close to the factory spec.

  19. #69
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    Thanks Faulksy. I'm thinking of having a go at repairing one of those starter switches as a spare - maybe using parts from a contact breaker set? Greta reference on the gear brain. i already have the rebuild kit. I'm itching to get stuck in now!
    1968 DS21bvh Pallas in Gris Palladium

    Restoration blog: https://ds-restoration.blogspot.co.uk

  20. #70
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    I think the starter switches were the same all through production so if you can find one, go for it. As long as the contacts are clean the switch will work, the most common failure is the plastic disintegrating.

    I think the o-rings in the seal kit I got are slightly oversized given how much force it took to push the pistons past but it seems to work fine. I'd imagine being a LHD you'll have an easier time with the seal plate for the pipes to the gearbox. The only real challenge is bleeding the thing once it's all together. As far as i can tell you have to undo the 5 flare nuts at the gearbox and run the system through the gears. It might be worth filling all of the pipework with LHM before fitting the selector.

  21. #71
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    Thanks for tip Faulksy.
    1968 DS21bvh Pallas in Gris Palladium

    Restoration blog: https://ds-restoration.blogspot.co.uk

  22. #72
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
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    try changing the big silver tin capacitors. I think these might be on the output that drives the injectors (transisters/fets .. can't remember which). Mine always ran two of the injectors years ago when I was tinkering with it (obviously with massive flooding) until I changed them.

    have you checked the earth wiring? the transistors supply 12volts but they injectors needs to be permanently earthed. If the earth connection is crook, the injectors will fail (in pairs). It it sin't the earth, you probably have a dead transistor.

    I would be very tempted to go the route of an aftermarket injection system on a DS and move away from the ancient electronics. especially the modern units that "self learn" with the addition of an oxy sensor.

    seeya
    Shane L.
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  23. #73
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    Shane, you need to read to the end of posts - even when they are more than one paragraph long!

    Here is a quote from faulksy (post #68) : "A new set of ignition points caused it to cough into life on all 4 cylinders ... It now starts first time every time as if the last 6 months hadn't happened!"

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    I'm very tempted to replace the D-Jetronic with megasquirt or something similar but really wanted to see what shape the engine was in before reinventing the wheel. The biggest fear was that I'd go to through the whole exercise and then have to troubleshoot a 3rd party custom EFI setup on top of sorting the engine. Turns out the D-Jet system is amazingly robust. Since I've owned the car its been shorted out, burned, flooded and yet still works perfectly!

    https://youtu.be/0nRa7isdL8k

    There's something to be said for German engineering! It's running a bit rough but no worse than it has since I've owned it. Seems to have a slight miss which occasionally caused some jerkiness while cruising. No idea what causes it and have replace or adjusted everything I can think of.

    The real draw of megasquirt is that it's almost plug and play with D-Jet.
    Last edited by faulksy; 12th September 2019 at 04:00 PM.
    Vincenzo likes this.

  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by faulksy View Post
    I'm very tempted to replace the D-Jetronic with megasquirt or something similar but really wanted to see what shape the engine was in before reinventing the wheel. The biggest fear was that I'd go to through the whole exercise and then have to troubleshoot a 3rd party custom EFI setup on top of sorting the engine. Turns out the D-Jet system is amazingly robust. Since I've owned the car its been shorted out, burned, flooded and yet still works perfectly!

    https://youtu.be/0nRa7isdL8k

    There's something to be said for German engineering! It's running a bit rough but no worse than it has since I've owned it. Seems to have a slight miss which occasionally caused some jerkiness while cruising. No idea what causes it and have replace or adjusted everything I can think of.

    The real draw of megasquirt is that it's almost plug and play with D-Jet.
    Faulksy. You’ve heard me say it before. Mega squirt and one less thing to go wrong. Combined with 123 it should run beautifully

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