CX Prestige rescue
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Thread: CX Prestige rescue

  1. #1
    Tadpole
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    3

    Default CX Prestige rescue

    Hi all,

    I'm new here, and new to Citroens. My background is 15 years in the trade specialising in old Mercedes, particularly the full hydro W116 6.9 and W126 500 models, so I'm not new to cars that can lie flat on their bellies.

    I've long had an itch for a big Citroen, and particularly the CX. They are not readily available here in South Africa, so I've eventually opted for a non runner.

    Its a CX Prestige, auto, carb, aircon. It hasn't run for nearly 20 years, but it appears to be nearly all there, and very straight, I can't see any sign of accident or rust, and the interior seems very good indeed.

    Its lying flat on its belly, with flat tyres, on soft ground. I will be going to retrieve it this Saturday, so I would be grateful for any do's and don'ts and advice on where and how to try and lift the car, how to wedge the suspsension etc , so that I can tow it forward, and get it onto the roll back tray truck.

    Thanks in advance, I look forward to putting up some pictures of the rescue process.

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  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger! Bruce Llewellyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Toowoomba
    Posts
    601

    Default

    Make sure you have plenty of time - you may need to dig holes under the car to install jacks to change wheels if they don't hold air. I have spent up to 4 hours getting a CX onto a trailer.

    Rear wheel covers can be removed by undoing a weird looking screw inside the rear door cavity. This has to be unscrewed and then pulled out against a spring to release the front of the wheel cover, then the cover is pulled forward and down to release it from the bodywork.

    Pump tyres up.

    Make sure you have the technical information on how and where to jack it. (see if there is an owner's handbook) These things have more than 60% of the weight on the front wheels, so they can easily nose dive off jacks.

    There are places where you can fit small hardwood blocks between the bump rubbers and the suspension arms, however these are not where you would expect them to be - the front bump rubbers are in oval tunnels in the front main cross member assembly - one is behind the end of the cylinder head at cylinder head height, the other is under the spare wheel (if fitted) Blocks 22mm x 30mm by 50mm work (from memory) depending on the condition of the bump rubbers.

    The rears are inside a 120mm diameter steel tube that runs across the car just in front of the rear wheels. They can be accessed from outside the car. The block goes between the bottom rubber and the steel 'blade' just as you wouldn't expect.

    DON"T jack under what look like chassis rails under the cabin area- these will buckle and put the chassis geometry out.

    DON't try to tow it unless you can see underneath - the exhaust can plough into the ground and make a really nasty mess, plus making the car impossible to move.

    DON'T get it rolling fast - as there is no way to stop or steer it with the engine not running. I have used another vehicle behind attached to the rear towing eyes to provide a way of braking a dead CX.

    DON'T force the steering to turn with the motor not running - this can break the inside of the steering hydraulic control unit. With the front tyres pumped up (30 psi) the steering will be very heavy with the car moving. The steering is only 2.5 turns lock to lock and with no hydraulic pressure there is a quarter turn of slack - this is normal. If it has to be turned, best to jack to reduce the load on the tyres.

    There are towing loops under the rear bumper, but towing forwards is usually best done by using a suitable rope or strap on the front lower suspension arm.

    As before, take your time - it's easy to damage these cars and they will fight back.
    Dano likes this.

  3. #3
    Tadpole
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Thank you so much for your detailed response.

    Fortunately the car is located on flat, level ground, so the risk of it rolling away is not going to be the biggest problem. I fear that one or more tyres may not hold air, and I don't have any other Citroen wheels lying around. What is the PCD? I have lots of 5/112 Mercedes wheels, I don't suppose I'll be sol lucky that they will fit?

    I note your concerns about not forcing/damaging the steering, and not kinking the chassis rails. My understanding is that the car was moved (in its dead state) from one location to its present location about 15 years ago. I hope that this type of damage was not already done during that move.

    Thanks again for your help.

  4. #4
    Tadpole
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    3

    Default

    OK I've found out that the wheels need to be 5/98, and ET44 or 49

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