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Thread: Dirty ideas..

  1. #1
    VIP Sponsor 59 Floride's Avatar
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    Default Dirty ideas..

    Now that I have your attention...

    Does anyone have cool ideas about cleaning rust and accumulated crap out of old fuel tanks...

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  2. #2
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Fill the tank full of molasses?

    And leave for a goodly time , weeks or months

  3. #3
    1000+ Posts renault8&10's Avatar
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    Throw a match in there?
    KB


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    If it's a plastic tank just wash it out with detergent and a hose. If you can get your hand in, scrub as well, and leave it somewhere warm to dry. Be careful of petrol vapour in the tank; tanks are dangerous.

    But I bet you have an antique steel job. As well as molasses, vinegar has its disciples. If you can invert the tank and drain everything out the top hole, I've seen people first wash the fuel out, then put in some small blue metal and shake the living daylights out of it to break up scale, "drain" the gravel (harder than you think) and then use the preferred cleaner.

  5. #5
    VIP Sponsor 59 Floride's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seasink View Post
    If it's a plastic tank just wash it out with detergent and a hose. If you can get your hand in, scrub as well, and leave it somewhere warm to dry. Be careful of petrol vapour in the tank; tanks are dangerous.

    But I bet you have an antique steel job. As well as molasses, vinegar has its disciples. If you can invert the tank and drain everything out the top hole, I've seen people first wash the fuel out, then put in some small blue metal and shake the living daylights out of it to break up scale, "drain" the gravel (harder than you think) and then use the preferred cleaner.
    I think I saw someone on youtube use the gravel method by strapping it onto the bowl of a backyard concrete mixer and letting it rotate for a couple of hours..

    So I think I'll try both methods, gravel and shake, then fill it with molasses for a while.
    Last edited by 59 Floride; 4th January 2014 at 09:09 PM.
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  6. #6
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 59 Floride View Post
    .... I'll try both methods, gravel and shake, then fill it with molasses for a while.
    Preferably at different times.

  7. #7
    1000+ Posts Kim Luck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 59 Floride View Post
    Now that I have your attention...

    Does anyone have cool ideas about cleaning rust and accumulated crap out of old fuel tanks...
    Try using very big filters.
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

  8. #8
    Contented Peugeot Driver addo's Avatar
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    I would seriously suggest splitting the tank and repairing, then reassembling and re-plating. Nothing else will come close.

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    the famous 18E pug206gti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by robmac View Post
    Fill the tank full of molasses?
    And leave for a goodly time , weeks or months


    G'day,
    this has come up before. Do a search and you will find all the answers.
    From memory, albeit a failing, molasses was the answer.
    regards,
    Les W.


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    the stealth Pug
    Did I do anything last night that suggested I was sane?








  10. #10
    1000+ Posts Kim Luck's Avatar
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    Default When I said big filters....

    These little beauties will take care of everything from small rocks down to microns and allow you to run really rich at 360 GPH.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Dirty ideas..-17.667.31.jpg  
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

  11. #11
    VIP Sponsor 59 Floride's Avatar
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    I just had a good look down the filler neck and sender hole and it's not that bad, just surface rust. Being an impatiant biatch as I am I'll do the crushed gravel approach and then swish a litre of rust converter around. That should do it, and then replace the fuel filter every week for a while.

  12. #12
    VIP Sponsor 59 Floride's Avatar
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    This is the go, concrete mixer, good for neighbourly relations.


  13. #13
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    POR Products (known to most Automotive Paint Suppliers) http://www.ppcco.com.au/fact_sheets/...krepairkit.pdf.
    I did a Traction tank with it and am happy with the result. Not cheap but does what it claims to do if you follow the instructions.
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  14. #14
    UFO
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    I spent a day helping a CCCNSW member remove a previous attempt at the POR treatment that he tried to do himself, then reclean and seal the tank of a D Special. IMHO It is essential when doing the POR treatment to have an assistant to help you do all the tasks and keep track of time and cleaning.

    It was a successful day as the tank is now in the operational car.
    Craig K
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    My 203 wagon tank was so badly laden with crap (nearly one and a half buckets of stinking mud-like substance) I ended up cutting to top off. This is not so hard if your Renault tank is of similar construction. The relatively flat top on the Peugeot tank has a continuous weld about 5mm wide around the top flange. Carefully cut out the top of this weld with an angle grinder, using the edge of a 5-6mm disc - making sure that you do not cut into the flange on the lower part of the tank. If you are worried that the sparks from the grinder might result in sudden conflagration the tank can be filled with water.

    In my case I had the tank sandblasted inside and out. I replaced the top using a MIG welder which filled in the missing weld. It may be possible to braze to top back on but you would have to be careful to avoid distortion of the top - a series of small tack brazes around the periphery should hold everything in place.

    The final step was KBC tank seal - cheaper than POR and it looks pretty good. No need to undertake the usual preparation as the tank seal sticks well to the freshly sandblasted surface.

  16. #16
    1000+ Posts PeterT's Avatar
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    My father in law gave his peppered 1927 Whippet tank the POR treatment about 5 years ago and it's still going strong.

    '92 205 Mi16
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  17. #17
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    I would be a bit dubious about cutting into a tank with a grinder. You would surprised what flammable vapours lurk in the nooks and crannies of a tank, and one spark could end badly. When I had to get a hole welded up in my first 203 (it got knocked off a jack which went through the tank) the guy who did blocked the filler neck and filled the tank with water through the hole in it's arse and left it like that for a while before applying any heat to it, and there still was an initial nasty flash of igniting fuel vapour when he started work on it.
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  18. #18
    VIP Sponsor 59 Floride's Avatar
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    I've had the said Fregate fuel tank strapped in the back of my ute horizontally for three weeks with a few handfuls of course river sand, a few pebbles, detergent and water, so every time I drive it the back and forth motion of the concoction is doing the work for me. I've emptied the water/detergent out a couple of times and sure enough the water is heavily rust laden and I can see spots of bare metal glimmering in the sunlight.

    In another week or so I'll give it a good rinse and then slosh some rust converter around to finish the job...

  19. #19
    1000+ Posts J-man's Avatar
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    You're a genius MG!
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    cheers,

    John

  20. #20
    1000+ Posts Kim Luck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 59 Floride View Post
    I've had the said Fregate fuel tank strapped in the back of my ute horizontally for three weeks with a few handfuls of course river sand, a few pebbles, detergent and water, so every time I drive it the back and forth motion of the concoction is doing the work for me. I've emptied the water/detergent out a couple of times and sure enough the water is heavily rust laden and I can see spots of bare metal glimmering in the sunlight.

    In another week or so I'll give it a good rinse and then slosh some rust converter around to finish the job...
    That's if the bare metal you can see now doesn't in fact disappear completely......?
    Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone............

  21. #21
    1000+ Posts robmac's Avatar
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    In another week or so I'll give it a good rinse and then slosh some rust converter around to finish the job...
    By that time you may "see the light" ..... through the tank filler spigot.

  22. #22
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    Give it a few trips upside down too as you will find varnish and rust both top and bottom. Obviously, you removed the sender and blocked the hole? I know when I tried te gravel trick with a DS tank, the baffles made it very difficult, so it helps if you know how the inside of the tank is constructed, both to get the gravel in and out later. In the case of the DS tank, I gave the gravel up as too hard and it was replaced.

    I have seen POR start to come off in one tank repair done on a vintage car by an experienced person, so it's not foolproof. Do a little digging before you blithely buy any vendor's sale hype. I know there are franchised POR-method operators out there and also alternative products, but older pros would probably solder in small repair plates. An alternative to the molasses bath could be vinegar with salt dissolved. It's quite effective, but will cause surface rust at the waterline and you'd want to finish off cleaning it with some other product. There is also the Bilt-Hamber DeOx C option for rust removal, but I find the black residue on the bare steel can be a problem, especially where the rusting is uneven.

  23. #23
    1000+ Posts schlitzaugen's Avatar
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    If the tank doesn't have internal baffles (or even if it does, but they're not too restrictive) I would recommend the sand (not gravel) treatment. Coarse, quartz sand you can get from lab supplies (they are used as blanks for instrument calibrations). About 2mm grain should be perfect. The cement mixer idea is just pure genius. Don't fill with water, aim for a sludge the consistency of melted ice cream for best efficiency.

    If baffles are very restrictive, I would recommend caustic soda you can buy for unclogging drains from supermarkets, bunnings, etc. Again, it's a good idea to use the cement mixer, but it is enough if you leave it a few days and just turn it upside down every 12 hours for instance (or every day). Don't piss around with it though. After cleaning, wash thoroughly, but keep in mind the surface is going to be perfectly clean and will flash rust in an hour. Fill up with petrol immediately if you can, or something that doesn't corrode the steel.

    Perhaps you can try a combination as well, like sand, water, caustic soda and cement mixer. I think this would be 100% efficient.

    If neither is an option, I would go the whole hog and split the tank as Addo suggested.

    I wouldn't use any paint/coating inside the fuel tank unless you can get the stuff they use on assault helicopters like the Apache.
    Last edited by schlitzaugen; 8th February 2014 at 04:08 AM.
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