Side draught Webber?
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  1. #1
    My Supermodel 63-1092's Avatar
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    Default Side draught Webber?

    The webber I have on my car is an old Italian one, and I'm looking at an another one but it's an American one.

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    I have read the Italian ones are better, is it true and what are the differences?
    John
    Александър Кристоф Шанел

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    1000+ Posts renault8&10's Avatar
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    Are you sure it is an American Weber?

    If it has two "B's" it's definitely a fake

    They used to all be made in Italy (Bologna I think), but a few years back I think they started getting made in Spain(?).

    I haven't heard of any being made in the US.

    Just to confuse things, there is another Italian brand of Carbie that looks (and acts) very similar to a Weber but is called a Dellorto (there are various incarnations of spellings depending on whether you choose the anglazied version as above or the true Italian spelling).
    KB
    KB


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    My Supermodel 63-1092's Avatar
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    The true Italian ones are spelt Webber I think, and the American are Weber. His add does say Weber, I just wonder if the trumpets or add ones are all inter-changable.

    Just had a look at a pic of mine and the Italian ones are spelt Weber .
    Last edited by 63-1092; 21st August 2012 at 04:18 PM.
    John
    Александър Кристоф Шанел

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    1000+ Posts renault8&10's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 63-1092 View Post
    The true Italian ones are spelt Webber I think, and the American are Weber. His add does say Weber, I just wonder if the trumpets or add ones are all inter-changable.

    Just had a look at a pic of mine and the Italian ones are spelt Weber .
    Not exactly. Sometimes when I say things like "I Think" and "Maybe" I really know, but don't like to appear too cocky. The Italian ones ARE Weber; were made in BOLOGNA, and ARE now made in Spain. As I said, I haven't heard of them being made in USA at any stage, but it wouldn't be the first time I've been wrong.

    I'd suggest you question them on where they were really made. If they were made in the USA, you may not be able to get chokes and jets for it 'cause they'd be in Imperial, and all the rest of the Weber spares are in Metric
    KB


  5. #5
    COL
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    Default Weber DCOE Carbs

    Hi 63-1092

    I have both Italian and Spanish ones here and both seem to work fine. All parts are interchangable.

    There are different sizes like 40, 45, 48.

    Get the person who is selling to send you a pic of the top of it.

    If you are thinking of using a pair of these carbs together you are better off getting a matched pair.

    Hope this helps
    Regards Col

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    Had a two hour drive to get to Perth and his last text was it's not Italian.
    I thought oh well for that price bad luck, so when he hands it oveeand says oh it is Italian with trumpets and he threw in two oval stainless air filters too it made up for the four hour return trip.
    John
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    As an aside, I was originally taught 'Weeber' as the pronunciation & was then introduced to 'Webber' & have occasionally wondered just what the national origin of the name is (not automatically Italian any more than 'Gordini' is French) as that would provide a guide. Anyone have anything better than Australian conventions to offer?

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    1000+ Posts renault8&10's Avatar
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    According to Wiki:

    Eduardo Weber (29 November 1889 - 17 May 1945)[1] was an Italian engineer and businessman, famous for creating the Weber carburetor.
    He was born in Torino to a Swiss father and mother from Piemonte. After graduating in mechanical engineering from the Università degli Studi di Torino (1913) he moved to Bologna to work for Fiat. He was a tutor to Amédée Gordini and, at Mugello, he raced a Fiat 501 to third place on 13 June 1920.[2]
    His work to remedy high gasoline prices resulted in the first Weber carburetor, a "sidedraft, double-throat ... bolted to a Weber designed overhead-valve/supercharger conversion for the 501 Fiat".[3] In 1923 he established the Fabbrica Italiana Carburatori Weber company.
    Weber was with the Italian Fascist Party.[4] After his disappearance in May 1945, Fiat eventually assumed control of the company in 1952.
    He is buried in the Certosa di Bologna.
    KB


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    1000+ Posts michaelr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4cvg View Post
    As an aside, I was originally taught 'Weeber' as the pronunciation & was then introduced to 'Webber' & have occasionally wondered just what the national origin of the name is (not automatically Italian any more than 'Gordini' is French) as that would provide a guide. Anyone have anything better than Australian conventions to offer?
    My understanding is the weber is German for weaver, and in German is pronuonced as such ie weaver but with a “b”.
    What I don't know however is how Weber is pronounced in Northern Italy.
    Michael
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    1000+ Posts renault8&10's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelr View Post
    My understanding is the weber is German for weaver, and in German is pronuonced as such ie weaver but with a “b”.
    What I don't know however is how Weber is pronounced in Northern Italy.
    Old Eduardo had a Swiss father and an Italian mother, so it is quite likely Dad may have been Swiss German, and that "Weeber" may well be the correct pronounciation for his fathers' nationality as you mention. We'll have to wait for any Italian speakers to comment on what might have happened to the pronounciation once they settled in Bologna.
    KB


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    The very brief time I spent in the Italian speaking part of Switzerland it was quite clearly pronounced ."Vayber". Remember that there are French, german and Italian speaking parts of Switzerland as well as a heap of dialects.

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    Default Getting back to

    the original post i have a duel throat down draught carby like you would find on a 504 looks identical to a Weber but has Holley on the casting ,so maybe there was an under licence agreement thrown in to confuse things, think the Holley was of a 2 litre Cortina PUGS

  13. #13
    Fellow Frogger! R8 Dream's Avatar
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    Certainly the name is not Italian, as there is no "w" in the Italian alphabet.
    Angelo

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    Quote Originally Posted by R8 Dream View Post
    Certainly the name is not Italian, as there is no "w" in the Italian alphabet.
    Angelo
    Ang, don't confuse the anglo-australians.
    John
    Александър Кристоф Шанел

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    1000+ Posts N5GTi6's Avatar
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    Solex also did a DCOE copy. I had twin Solex side draughts on a previous Fiat at one stage. I can say I had Japanese carbies on an Italian car in a French car forum where I couldn't say it without being flamed in an Italian car forum....

    They were such exact copies that 'most' parts were interchangeable - jets / tubes / venturies / ram tubes - and they bolted to a standard DCOE manifold. The only differences I could ever find was that Webers had roller bearings on the butterfly spindles and the Solex's had crappy bronze / brass bush bearings.

    Cheers

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    Default vebber copies !

    Hi,
    At some previous time I flirted with Fiats. I had some acquaintances who had a 'mountain' of parts etc. (probably because they failed by rusting ?)
    I was interested in sorting some carbies to fit my buggy engine, a twin cam Fiat. We pulled out these carbies which were branded Weber, Holley, Delorto, and Solex. They were all off the 124 model and all appeared 'very similar' if not identical. I guess they just got any manufacturer to supply to the orininal pattern.

    Those were the days Fiats were fun and mechanically tough. The two Fiat engines I ran over the years NEVER failed to start or to finish the day.
    Jaahn

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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwia110 View Post
    The very brief time I spent in the Italian speaking part of Switzerland it was quite clearly pronounced ."Vayber". Remember that there are French, german and Italian speaking parts of Switzerland as well as a heap of dialects.
    0K from now on I intend to adopt that pronunciation (sounds German). At least people won't be tempted to double the 'b' that way :-)
    Peter

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