R12 Front Calipers
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  1. #1
    Tadpole Jeffro's Avatar
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    Default R12 Front Calipers

    Hi all,
    Just purchased an unregistered R12 that has been basically looked after the last 10 years or so. The brakes don't feel sooo strong but not sure what to compare it to. (Previous Mk 1 cortina perhaps felt bit stronger and they weren't assisted...) Not checked by mechanic yet. Previous receipts within last 20000km (2001-current) stating new rotors and master cylinder and maybe wheel cylinders.

    A previous receipt also states "needs calipers reconditioned and new wheel cylinders".

    How much would you pay a french specialist shop in brissy to re-do the calipers if in fact they require attention? (For those in Bris, I've had experience with Peugeotech on Brissy northside, DS motors and Euroserve). Car has not been driven hardly since june this year. Previous to that it was a regular driver but low kms per year. Probably good place to start is new fluid and good check over i know.

    Any feedback from R12 owners?

    Jeff.
    Ps - great forum/site/road test articles.

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    Last edited by Jeffro; 1st December 2005 at 12:37 AM.

  2. #2
    Fellow Frogger! renault12's Avatar
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    Are the brakes vaccum assisted or not? You do need to press quite hard on the non assisted models but they still stop effectivley. Wheel cylinders won't affect the braking quality, you'll just find your losing fluid if they are leaking. I think you'll find the brakes are normal: if the calipers need to be reconditioned it's normally not because it's hard to stop, it's because they are sticking. Take them apart, give them a good clean with brake parts cleaner and replace any seals you can see are leaking. Also check that the discs are above minimum thickness and that the pads still have life left in them and all should be fine. Bleeding the brakes certainly wouldn't hurt either.
    Toby

  3. #3
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    Hi Jeff,

    I'd suggest that the brakes are as powerful as a MkI Cortina (it's been a while since I've driven a Corty). Mine's a 1975 and it's quite hard to lock up the wheels in the dry, but it will do it (it has fairly sticky 175's on it). I have no complaints with the brakes, which only have issues with fading when you're really pressing on (or carrying big weight).

    I can't give you any prices as I do all my own work. Parts-wise, the caliper seals and wheel cylinders are pretty cheap from Caravelle in Melbourne on (03) 98909061 (mail order if needed). Certainly if they're sticky, it could affect the brake pedal pressure.

    Stuey


    2003 PEUGEOT 206 GTi

  4. #4
    Tadpole Jeffro's Avatar
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    Default R12 Brakes

    Thanks Toby and Stuey,

    TS model so power assisted brakes.
    The previous owner stated he had receipts showing that the little thing had new rotors which apparently was a big job. I also saw a receipt that said the left calipers had a re-do kit put through them/overhauled.

    No fluid loss that i've noticed (but only just got it last weekend and have only tootled unregistered around my block a few times!)

    Will follow up with an update when i actually get it on the road and pay the brakes some proper attention.

    Thanks again for the feedback.

    Jeff

    P.S. Stuey, are your 175 tyres on non-standard rims/wheels? I probably wouldn't mind a touch sharper turn in etc eventually...
    Last edited by Jeffro; 1st December 2005 at 12:39 AM.

  5. #5
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    Jeff, I've never liked people repairing one caliper and not the other. When they're the same age, they're as worn/corroded as each other, usually!

    The rotor change is a pretty reasonable job. You have to dismantle the hub as the rotor is sandwiched between the outer and inner.

    The 175's are on the ubiquitous 5.5" x 13" Cosmic alloys. These cause a bit of rubbing on the rear guards with stock springs (mine has stiffer rears than stock).

    I've found with stiffer rears and an R17 anti-roll bar on the front, it handles quite nicely. I don't flog it like I used to, though.

    Any questions, feel free to ask. There are plenty of R12 threads on here if you do a search.

    Edit: just had a thought - I wonder if the rear brake proportioning valve is working. Maybe you're getting no braking from the rears?

    Stuey


    2003 PEUGEOT 206 GTi

  6. #6
    1000+ Posts BogMaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuey

    Edit: just had a thought - I wonder if the rear brake proportioning valve is working. Maybe you're getting no braking from the rears?

    Stuey
    I was thinking that too Stuey. It can be hard to pick if you are working by yourself or unable to take the car out for a decent flogging. (last time I got caught out on that it was only the dreaded car on rollers brake test at the local RTA pits that showed it up.)

    What's the disc pad/rotor situation like? If the car has been standing unused for a while there could be minor issues with surface corrosion on the rotors that might just interfere with braking initially on round the block excursions (until worn off by the pads).Anyway it is worth checking the condition of those components.

    Check the brake booster body for signs of any brake fluid leaks from the front of the master cylinder.

    Brake booster vacuum hose and valve should be checked for leaks (stick your ear down around the valve , wiggle the hose a bit and listen for hissing. Turn engine off, with foot pressing on the brake. Start the engine, the action of the booster should result in the pedal sinking a little.

    Try bleeding everything and flushing through new fluid in the process, take the drums off the rear and check for fluid leaks around the cylinders, get up under the rear and check out the proportioning valve. I can't remember whether there is a bleed nipple there on the 12 as I haven't had a 12 for a while now. Check the valve for leaks, if there is a nipple on it then make sure you bleed that as well, stick to the order outlined in your service manual.

    Check the flexible hoses for cracks/ ballooning etc.

    I guess what I'm saying is that you need to work through the main braking system components. Since you have just got this car it is a worthwhile exercise.

    Replacing wheel cylinders and overhauling callipers on a 12 isn't rocket science, the callipers are really straight forward compared to some vehicles. As mentioned before, Caravelle in Melbourne can supply parts or you may want to get your existing cylinders sleeved and kitted locally. Either way you are going to have few hassles in that department.

    If you don't do it yourself, you can expect that these things can be replaced/overhauled fairly cheaply - the parts are cheap and any mechanic who has half a brain isn't going to rack up a lot of costly hours doing the actual work.

    Last edited by BogMaster; 1st December 2005 at 10:27 AM.
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