Fuego fun
  • Register
  • Help
Page 1 of 2 12 Last
Results 1 to 25 of 36

Thread: Fuego fun

  1. #1
    Tadpole
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Wellington - NZ
    Posts
    7

    Default Fuego fun

    Hi,
    just joined Frogs...
    I have a Fuego (argh!). Anyway it's been stored for s couple of years, and misses.. I've already replaced the ignition module and TDC sensor (was definately crook). About to replace the distributor (I think this is the problem), and then spark leads. If that doesn't work the coil on the carby seems to be the next step.
    I've replaced the clutch and pressure plate (however it still doesn't disengaged without depressing the clutch to the floor, I've adjusted it as per the manual). Gears grate... no syncro left in second? I need to change the gear box oil though...
    Over heats, I think the radiator temperature sensor is bung... have to check this with the boiling the jug check.
    Had a new exhaust put on (when I got it there were three mufflers and about ten different guages of pipe), so now it's got one centre and a corby on the back (way too loud). And the rear suspension seems to bottom out on the pipe over moderate bumps.
    The rear suspension seems to be very low as well (stuffed springs?).
    I had the wind screen replaced as well, and put new Pirelli P600s on the front.

    Anyway anybody got some advice on what to do... scrap it and get some horrid japper or carry on with the cursed car? Paid way too much for it at the start and it's been in storage for three years (hardly used it).

    Cheers

    Advertisement

  2. #2
    1000+ Posts edgedweller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    CLARE SA
    Posts
    2,324

    Default

    Hey Dougs, welcome to Aussiefrogs, well you finally found the right place to talk and get advice on Fuegos. Most of the Fuegoites on the forum seem to be having so much fun they can hardly contain themselves. Bang for buck they don't come much better, you obviously like the style, there seem to be lots around and you can hardly give them away so parts must be cheap.

    The main problem everyone seems to go on about is the metric rim sizes which force you to buy very expensive but v average tyres if you can get them, do a search of reno forum for proper exchange to 14 or 15 inch rims.

    Your major worry will be body wholeness, a little rust repairable a lotta rust or much panel damage or twisted throw it out the back for spares, hopefully you scored a good one at the price you paid.

    Anyhow they are sturdy little beasts that like being thrashed, new parts are still available, plenty of second hand spares and if you like tinkering it could be a match made in heaven.

    Go for it.

    ed ge Peugeot driver

    very serious penalties here for talking japanese!

    Check out thread 'speaking of fuegos' for a good read & see if message no. 51 inspires you.

  3. #3
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    8,413

    Default

    Hello and welcome to the forum.You sound like a fuego owner in your determination to get the thing going well ,and resisting the jap crap.I'd be calling that one the spare,(I'd probably be calling it a lot of other names if I had to commute in it) and getting one without those MAJOR problems.By the sound of it , the main good things are the screen,tyres and exhaust, which are big ticket items and very useable. whatever you do it sounds like you need another fuego to make one good one out of,or else you will be paying more in spares than it will cost to just buy a decent one.
    Jo

  4. #4
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Melbourne Victoria
    Posts
    11,906

    Default New Fuego/spare

    If the present experience here is any indication of the situation in New Zealand, there should be plenty of cheap Fuego options about, over there of course you have non metric original rims so tyres are still available I'm told.

    Based on experience here, I would be looking around the NZ market for a reasonable running Fuego that doesn't have cooling problems and the engine runs sweetly transmission o.k. and then using the best of your parts/trim etc to upgrade that car to top standard. and then enjoy the driving experience.

    There is nothing wrong with perservering with your own car if you wish, but it will be a long haul to get it back into peak condition, all it takes is time, effort and money and the amount of each will depend heavily upon your mechanical experience and ingenuity with these cars.

    As the car has been lying around for three years with little progress towards a solution I would suggest the get another running Fuego is the better option.

    List all the really good re-useable things on your car and try and get one that will benefit from those and has least of your cars problems. The new car should be cheaper to aquire because of poor trims, dented replaceable panels, worn tyres, interior etc. use your bargaining power.

    That course will be a lot less frustrating than dealing with the individual issues on your car and get you to enjoy your Fuego driving experience instantly.

    You also have a loyal band of Fuego owners in New Zealand, that can give advice and help on line.

    Hope that helps.

    Ken

  5. #5
    Simon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    6,174

    Default

    What model and year is your Fuego? 1.4 litre TL, 1.56 litre GTS or Turbo or a 2 litre TX or GTX?

    What is the body like for rust and paint? If it has a good straight body with decent paint it would be a shame to see it wrecked, as mechanicals are generally relatively easy to repair or replace. Also it would be a shame to see an otherwise decent Fuego with slight flaws ratted for parts.

    The overheating could be cause by incorrect bleeding or a silted up radiator from being left standing for so long. The original alloy radiators are notoriously fussy when it comes to coolant and maintenance. The gearbox as you say could just be low on oil, although if it is an early gearbox they were prone to gear problems.

    The missing could be a stuck valve from being stored, did it do it before it was stored? Probably try a compression check, it could also be a popped head gasket which also causes the overheating. With the overheating do the fans switch on? Presumably not if you are testing the switch.

    What exhaust is on the car now? A stock setup, or something that has been made up? An incorrectly curved pipe and fiddled mounts could make the pipe touch the axle on bumps.

    The clutch, what free play is at the pedal, and are all the proper brackets in place to support the cable? Has the flywheel been over machined to remove any score marks?

    Probably not so important for the moment, but if you do decide to get the car running properly, best to replace the cambelt (if it is a 2 litre motor) as it could have deteriorated from lack of use whilst in storage.

  6. #6
    Tadpole
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Wellington - NZ
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Ah well. I think for the moment I'll persevere with the one I've got. Already orderd the distributor cap. It probably isn't as bad as I've made it sound (at least there isn't actually anything wrong with the rear suspension as such).

    Also there are parts of the car that are sounds, anyway with the way petrol prices are going I"ll be taking the train to work from tomorrow!

    I'll let you now how we get on with it...

    Cheers

  7. #7
    Tadpole
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Wellington - NZ
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Oh exhaust sorry; the manifold is stock, but from that back it's been replaced with 2" pipe (hence incorrect bending is very likely, esp as it was done by a back yarder who's disappeared). It's a bit loud and drony though, people know I'm coming.

  8. #8
    Fellow Frogger! Westair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    558

    Default

    We have only just bought a Fuego which is basically sound. Has TRX tyres which aren't as bad as everyone makes out and are still available.
    Even though one owner we are replacing all belts just in case. If not on distance they should be replaced every eight years.

    It is unusual that there is so much "knocking" of the Fuego in Aussie when overseas it is accepted as great handling, good performance car.
    The main thing this is doing is making available a 2 litre, airconned, power steering, electric windowed, fantastic seats, etc etc car at a ridiculously cheap price.

    Get in now!!!!
    1986 Renault Fuego GTX
    1972 Mercedes Benz 280E
    1988 Nissan Trakka Campervan
    1972 VW Kombi

    In business, words are words; explanations are explanations, promises are promises, but only performance is reality.
    Harold Ganeen.

  9. #9
    Tadpole
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Wellington - NZ
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Simon
    What model and year is your Fuego? 1.4 litre TL, 1.56 litre GTS or Turbo or a 2 litre TX or GTX?

    What is the body like for rust and paint? If it has a good straight body with decent paint it would be a shame to see it wrecked, as mechanicals are generally relatively easy to repair or replace. Also it would be a shame to see an otherwise decent Fuego with slight flaws ratted for parts.

    The overheating could be cause by incorrect bleeding or a silted up radiator from being left standing for so long. The original alloy radiators are notoriously fussy when it comes to coolant and maintenance. The gearbox as you say could just be low on oil, although if it is an early gearbox they were prone to gear problems.

    The missing could be a stuck valve from being stored, did it do it before it was stored? Probably try a compression check, it could also be a popped head gasket which also causes the overheating. With the overheating do the fans switch on? Presumably not if you are testing the switch.

    What exhaust is on the car now? A stock setup, or something that has been made up? An incorrectly curved pipe and fiddled mounts could make the pipe touch the axle on bumps.

    The clutch, what free play is at the pedal, and are all the proper brackets in place to support the cable? Has the flywheel been over machined to remove any score marks?

    Probably not so important for the moment, but if you do decide to get the car running properly, best to replace the cambelt (if it is a 2 litre motor) as it could have deteriorated from lack of use whilst in storage.
    Sorry keep reading through and realising the unanswered questions:

    Rust - none. Body straight and paint good, some of the plastic bits coming off.

    Clutch - no free play, have to depress to floor to properly declutch, could possibly be missinga bracket though (maybe not put back on when the engine was replaced), check that tonight. I doubt the fly wheel has been machined (what score marks, what should I check for?).

    Cam - proably never touched, could try that.

    Valves - my hunch is that the problem is a weak spark, before I stored it I "filled" the engine with crc.

    Overheating; again when I removed the engine I mucked up the electrics when putting it back together (switch the fog lights on and the engine dies ! - fixed now though, headl;ights weren't earthed properlky but that seems to have been a fault with the original manufacture). I'll probably dsrain and refill the radiator at some stage soon as well.

    Cheers

  10. #10
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    8,413

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Westair
    Has TRX tyres which aren't as bad as everyone makes out and are still available:
    yes they are as bad as everyone makes out. the only good thing about a trx is that you will get 100K+ out of them.They handle badly, are hopeless in the wet, and are expensive and hard to get.If you drive at sub nanna speeds they might just do, but when pushed, they will let you down in spectacular style.The only thing worse than a trx in my book is a re-treaded TRX.Of which I have Two. you can actually see the deformations in the roundness without the wheel spinning.
    Jo

  11. #11
    Fellow Frogger! ajpolden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Launceston, Tasmania
    Posts
    291

    Default

    So what exactly do you stick a fuego to the road with? Replace the wheels and put normal tyres on it?
    By the sounds of it if I ever get a fuego the tryes will be the deciding factor.
    Sorry if i'm intruding on another's thread
    Andrew.
    Current:
    1999 406SV (D8)
    Previous:
    1986 BX19GT

  12. #12
    Fellow Frogger! Westair's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    558

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ajpolden
    So what exactly do you stick a fuego to the road with? Replace the wheels and put normal tyres on it?
    By the sounds of it if I ever get a fuego the tryes will be the deciding factor.
    Sorry if i'm intruding on another's thread
    Andrew.

    No worries Andrew-there are plent of wheels that will fit and TRXs were standard equipment on quite a few Ferraris, Porsches etc and wheels and tyres would be last on my list of check items when buying any car.
    1986 Renault Fuego GTX
    1972 Mercedes Benz 280E
    1988 Nissan Trakka Campervan
    1972 VW Kombi

    In business, words are words; explanations are explanations, promises are promises, but only performance is reality.
    Harold Ganeen.

  13. #13
    Fellow Frogger! ajpolden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Launceston, Tasmania
    Posts
    291

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Westair
    ... last on my list of check items when buying any car.
    Thanks
    I reckon they would be last on my list too, but it's good to know that I wouldn't have a problem if I found an otherwise great car.
    Current:
    1999 406SV (D8)
    Previous:
    1986 BX19GT

  14. #14
    wielder of the sword Australdi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    spinsterhood
    Posts
    3,410

    Icon14

    Quote Originally Posted by ajpolden
    So what exactly do you stick a fuego to the road with?
    I can highly reccomend the BF Goodriches I'm running on mine....they stick like glue & don't cost a fortune! (205/50 R15)

    Aus
    Aus
    ".....the good health of a pond is held in a delicate balance. A pond's condition
    deteriorates when the bottom environment cannot support animal life.
    The bottom is the area that runs out of oxygen first, it is where the most oxygen is used........"



    '84 fuego GTX
    '87 fuego GTX
    '85 fuego GTX
    ....beginning to look a bit frightning isn't it.

  15. #15
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Melbourne Victoria
    Posts
    11,906

    Default Old hard TRX V New rubber no contest.

    Quote Originally Posted by jo proffi
    yes they are as bad as everyone makes out. the only good thing about a trx is that you will get 100K+ out of them.They handle badly, are hopeless in the wet, and are expensive and hard to get.If you drive at sub nanna speeds they might just do, but when pushed, they will let you down in spectacular style.The only thing worse than a trx in my book is a re-treaded TRX.Of which I have Two. you can actually see the deformations in the roundness without the wheel spinning.
    Jo

    Its is funny how things change, in reading through the Australian Motoring Year book 1982/83 adds for the latest tyre technology Michelin espoused - "On the road, because of its unique construction, the TRX provides a standard of comfort and silent running never before seen in a tyre capable of such high performance. It's not surprising that TRX is fitted standard to such top European cars as Ferrari, BMW, Saab Turbo, Peugeot and the Renault Fuego, as well Australia's Ford Ltd. Michelin TRX on the race track or the road, its state of the art." and the motoring writers of the day hailed them as the best performance tyre in the world during their tests.

    How times change, but I must admit that Australdi's Fuego has outstanding tyre stickability and stability through twisty bends. Far better than my TRX that I am still running on mine.

    Note embolding added above just to show Michelin knew their top performance cars

  16. #16
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Melbourne Victoria
    Posts
    11,906

    Default Some tips.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dougs
    Clutch - no free play, have to depress to floor to properly declutch, could possibly be missinga bracket though (maybe not put back on when the engine was replaced), check that tonight. I doubt the fly wheel has been machined (what score marks, what should I check for?).

    Cam - proably never touched, could try that.

    Valves - my hunch is that the problem is a weak spark, before I stored it I "filled" the engine with crc.

    Overheating; again when I removed the engine I mucked up the electrics when putting it back together (switch the fog lights on and the engine dies ! - fixed now though, headl;ights weren't earthed properlky but that seems to have been a fault with the original manufacture). I'll probably dsrain and refill the radiator at some stage soon as well.

    Cheers
    Draining and refilling radiator - Check if the water pump is leaking any weaping and it will require replacement, it will only get worse and loss of pressure will cause boiling prematurely If that is ok get a slightly lower temp radiator sensor (Caravelle have them - actulaly made for a Peugeot but fits Fuego radiator) clean and flush fill with demineralized water and a good quality inhibitor - I use Nulon coolant concentrate mixed to their recommended proportion. Check that the rubber seal in the cap of the coolant expansion bottle and under the cap on the radiator are in good order. Bleed air out of the system as per haynes manual.

    Clutch you will see that there is a straight rod that activates the clutch lever, make up a similar one from the shank of a mild steel bolt but slightly longer (say quarter of an inch) see if this allows more adjustment - occasionally you could have a bent disengagement fork or just a well stretched cable - look in old Fuego posts to see how to seat a new cable and set clutch pedal height for comfortable operation.

    Cambelt- if you don't know when it was last changed do it now and replace the A/C compressor belt at the same time. If the water pump is leaking replace that at the same time - If you can't source new spares locally Caravelle in Melbourne have new parts. Mark the kilometers and date of change of the cambelt on the cambelt cover.

    Distributor - on the later Power steering models the distributor is on the lower nearside, I have found them prone to depletion of the internal central carbon rod leading to miss firing also fitting new leads/dist. cap often help.

    Ken

  17. #17
    Simon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    6,174

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kenfuego
    "On the road, because of its unique construction, the TRX provides a standard of comfort and silent running never before seen in a tyre capable of such high performance. It's not surprising that TRX is fitted standard to such top European cars as Ferrari, BMW, Saab Turbo, Peugeot and the Renault Fuego, as well Australia's Ford Ltd. Michelin TRX on the race track or the road, its state of the art."
    That reads as if it is a rip from a Michelin press release rather than an objective assessment by an independent assessor.

    A fair few owners didn’t agree with that assessment, more than once new owners complained of “wheel bearing noise”, “tyre noise” or “rhythmic whirring noise” as warranty problems only to be told that the noise was a characteristic of the TRX tyres. Certainly my own thoughts were that they were a very noisy and coarse tyre, probably because of the block pattern, and likely a reason why not all different size/pattern TRX’s were equally afflicted.

    It was one of those option boxes LNC should have left unticked.

  18. #18
    1000+ Posts BogMaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Canberra,act,australia
    Posts
    1,457

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dougs
    Hi,
    just joined Frogs...


    Anyway anybody got some advice on what to do... scrap it and get some horrid japper or carry on with the cursed car? Paid way too much for it at the start and it's been in storage for three years (hardly used it).

    Cheers
    Ali Ben Anderson of Kenfuegoexports in Melbourne may be able to freight a replacement vehicle across the trench for a very reasonable price.
    Woo Hoo Honi ko'u 'elemu (Hawaiian)

  19. #19
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Melbourne Victoria
    Posts
    11,906

    Default Could be simon

    Quote Originally Posted by Simon
    That reads as if it is a rip from a Michelin press release rather than an objective assessment by an independent assessor.

    A fair few owners didn’t agree with that assessment, more than once new owners complained of “wheel bearing noise”, “tyre noise” or “rhythmic whirring noise” as warranty problems only to be told that the noise was a characteristic of the TRX tyres. Certainly my own thoughts were that they were a very noisy and coarse tyre, probably because of the block pattern, and likely a reason why not all different size/pattern TRX’s were equally afflicted.

    It was one of those option boxes LNC should have left unticked.
    It was the motoring Industry writer for Business Review Weekly July 1982 after driving the Puegeot 505 five speed manual turbo-diesel over 2,500 km, among other things the unnamed writer said Quote [ The car's renowned road-holding, with long-wheel travel soaking up the bumps, is boosted by some very nice alloy wheels and Michelin TRX tyres, which are arguably the best in the world. Unquote page 226

    Also at page 32 this Quote [TRX Michelin tyres were being offerred in 1982 in Australia on more and more top-of-the-line cars, but not all makers were properly softening the suspension to deal with the added harshness of this tyre. But the (BMW) 733 worked well on the tyres, certainly better than the SAAB Turbo, and deserves better sales results] Unquote
    Last edited by Kenfuego; 7th September 2005 at 09:14 PM. Reason: minor

  20. #20
    Member Dale34's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    53

    Default

    I miss my Fuego...

    Just sold my 206 GTi as well

    Got no car....
    Renault Fuego GTX '83 --- Gone and Missed
    Renault 16 TS '76 --- Being restored - slowly

    Peugeot 206 GTi '01 SOLD

    2005 Renault Sport Clio Cup


  21. #21
    1000+ Posts The Gonz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,499

    Default Yokohamas good too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Australdi
    I can highly reccomend the BF Goodriches I'm running on mine....they stick like glue & don't cost a fortune! (205/50 R15)

    Aus
    I'll throw in my lot. Since fitting new Yokohamas to my Fuego, I haven't been able to get as much as a squeal despite gut wrenching multiple-G-force turns.

  22. #22
    Fellow Frogger! ColinJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    136

    Default

    I like the dunlop SP sport things that I put on my last car and came as standrad on my new scenic - they have the silicon in them which gives good roadholding and mileage. (hope you can keep up with my high tech talk!)

    it's said the ride is a bit harsher but there's no such thing as harsh ride in a renault
    1970 R12, stupidly sold in 1983
    1976 504, died 1994 to my disgrace
    Various cheap nasty fridges on wheels I'm not going to confess to and are long gone anyway
    2002 Clio 1.6
    2005 Scenic II

  23. #23
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    8,413

    Default

    I think when talking about the fuego in respect to wheels/tyres, it needs to be establish what sort of driving you are doing.Some people will never drive beyond the capabilities of the TRX,and to them the tyres may not disapoint.
    But to anyone who has plans of driving the car to its full potential,the TRX is leathal.I had 4 of them lockup once at very high speed,and have had them fail under extreme braking/cornering. The single bigest performance boost you can give the fuego is good shoes.I personaly like my 195/15/50, but Other people run different sizes with good resaults.If you have not tried different wheel/tyre setups to the TRX,you dont know what you are missing.
    On the subject of noise, you want to hear my ultra-lights with dunlop fm901's on.The left and right do this weird phasing sound at about 60Km/h.
    Jo

  24. #24
    Real cars have hydraulics DoubleChevron's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Ballarat,Vic,Aust.
    Posts
    16,426

    Default

    Guys,

    bin the TRX's, they are trully a disgustingly bad tyre... My brother fitted 215/45 16" wheels/tyres under his Fuego when he had it ... Man that bloody thing could corner ... And the steering was so much lighter you'd swear someone had fitted power steering to it (it's the profile of the tyres and sidewall flex that makes the steering heavier)...

    seeya,
    Shane L.
    'Cit' homepage:
    Citroen Workshop
    Proper cars--
    '85 Series II CX2500 GTi Turbo I
    '63 ID19 http://www.aussiefrogs.com/forum/citro%EBn-forum/90325-best-project-car-you-have-ever-seen.html
    '72 DS21 ie 5spd pallas (last looked at ... about 15years ago)
    '78 GS1220 pallas
    '92 Range Rover Classic ... 5spd manual.

    Yay ... No Slugomatics


    Modern Junk:
    '07 Poogoe 407 HDi 6spd manual

  25. #25
    1000+ Posts
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Melbourne Victoria
    Posts
    11,906

    Default Everyones right on the TRX

    Like Jo says
    it really depends upon how the driver uses their car and as far as the TRX tyres around today how old and hard they are.

    I know that when my TRX were just over 80,000 km and had been on the car since new (it had been registered but off the road for years and owned by the proverbial old lady) the hard compound would 4 wheel skid straight ahead under heavy braking on smooth bitumen in 60 kph peak traffic, only happenned once when an overtaking dill caused a line of traffic to crash stop as he barged in.

    That was enough for me to hang back a car length and a half in similar traffic (in Melbourne if you leave more room than that some idiot will jump from his lane in front of your car )

    Going around round-a-bouts at moderate speed and neutral accellaration they would squeal like a stuck pig, but going around tight corners under full accelaration, they might squeal, but the harder you accelarated the better they would perform, which is also the characteristic of the fuego on newer tyre configurations, as I can attest as I hung on the bejesus bar in di's Fuego on the downhill twisties.

    I believe that Michelin did adjust the compound on later TRX as some spares I have purchased have different markings and a softer compound, I suspect that it would be unlikely one would get 100,000 km out of those tyres.

    Its quite funny really, its a great car to drive in undulating country, takes all hills without effort, but it is [email protected]@dy exhilarating driven hard on twisty roads.

    The difference between the drivers that enjoy but don't "know" their Fuegos is the number of nearside bingles (shortage of spare left headlamps) caused when inexperienced drivers panic, back off or brake in corners instead of using their gearing and accellaration and the cars ability to pull them around corners.

    Both still love to drive their cars, some just don't understand how good they are if you understand the mood and characteristics of the Fuego.

Page 1 of 2 12 Last

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •