Renault service tools.
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  1. #1
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    Default Renault service tools.

    I don't know if anyone here is into this, but on eBay at present, there's a pile of supposedly special service tools for Renaults.
    May be of interest? In yankeeland.

    http://search.ebay.com.au/renault_W0QQfltZ9

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    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

  2. #2
    1000+ Posts HONG KONG PUGGY's Avatar
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    Me thinks they are fairly obscure tools, you'd only use them once in the life of most Renaults.
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    Simon's Avatar
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    Geez, at those asking prices he will have a hard time shifting them. Especially the incomplete ones!!

  4. #4
    Too many posts! JohnW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon
    Geez, at those asking prices he will have a hard time shifting them. Especially the incomplete ones!!
    That's true. There's a pile of them in Melbourne too - were on Ebay a couple of months ago. I'm in the process of trying to identify what they are. They're well used but some worthwhile (calliper alignment tools for example) although in 30 years I've needed none of them personally.

    Cheers

    JohnW

  5. #5
    Simon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnW
    They're well used but some worthwhile (calliper alignment tools for example)
    The brake tool is an Fre. 16. It fits in the place of the brake pads so you can check on the clearance of the swinging brake pad bracket where they bear on the brake pad itself. Probably a one off adjustment, and if the clamp doesn't bear on the back of the pad you know something is wrong anyway.

    And no, I'm not trying to put potential bidders off in order to snaffle up a bargain :-)

  6. #6
    1000+ Posts HONG KONG PUGGY's Avatar
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    I'd have to agree with John, in all my years of Ren/Pugging I have done wthout specialist tools, and for those jobs I am sure we are all injeaneous enuff to improvise.
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    R20TS x 3
    R18 GTS wagon x 2
    R10





    "When you hit the tree between the headlights thats understeer. Oversteer is when you hit the tree between the Tail Lights" - Wayne Bell

  7. #7
    Budding Architect ???? pugrambo's Avatar
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    there were some pug kits on there a while back as well

    again they were things that most people would be lucky to use once yet others may use all the time

    of course the freight to get them was going to be high as they were in the US
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    Quote Originally Posted by HONG KONG PUGGY
    I'd have to agree with John, in all my years of Ren/Pugging I have done wthout specialist tools, and for those jobs I am sure we are all injeaneous enuff to improvise.
    yeah, nothing beats getting a few cotton wool buds, al-foil & a coat hangar together to fix a problem...
    Then of course secured in the australian tradition with Gaffer tape & zip ties!

  9. #9
    1000+ Posts Europa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nate
    yeah, nothing beats getting a few cotton wool buds, al-foil & a coat hangar together to fix a problem...
    Then of course secured in the australian tradition with Gaffer tape & zip ties!
    You forgot silicon sealant ;-)
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  10. #10
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    Default No fencing wire?

    Quote Originally Posted by nate
    yeah, nothing beats getting a few cotton wool buds, al-foil & a coat hangar together to fix a problem...
    Then of course secured in the australian tradition with Gaffer tape & zip ties!
    Gosh, today I really feel my age when fencing wire, that old Australian traditional fix it all, doesn't rate mention along with, the ubiquitous pair of pliers or even the later chewing gum and bandaids solutions

    Ken

  11. #11
    1000+ Posts jo proffi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kenfuego
    Gosh, today I really feel my age when fencing wire, that old Australian traditional fix it all, doesn't rate mention along with, the ubiquitous pair of pliers or even the later chewing gum and bandaids solutions

    Ken
    Ken,I'm only 36 years old, but you'll be pleased to know that today my indicator lense popped out as the spring cradle had snapped, and I got out my pliers and cut off some fence wire. twisted it around the indicator body,bent the spring and use the bandaid for the cut I got from the pliers!
    Jo
    Ps thanks for the front guard. the car looks heaps better now.Havn't needed the custom piece of wire yet,but carry it with me just in case.

  12. #12
    1000+ Posts Wildebeest's Avatar
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    Default Renault Service Tools.

    A tool that all older Renault owners should have is the Facom tappet adjusting spanner. No more chewing the tops off the adjusting screw with a 4'' shifter.
    Has anyone done the rounds of the Volvo workshops. We were provided with a fairly substantial tool board and tools back in those troubled days. If they haven't "walked" the dealers may like to part with them.
    The "Olympic Torch" tool for fitting drive shaft boots was an interesting bit of gear to use.
    The Renault workshop manuals provided must have been made out of thrice re-cycled paper. They covered models that weren't sold here, 4WD's, diesels etc. They would have been dumped long ago.

  13. #13
    Simon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildebeest
    A tool that all older Renault owners should have is the Facom tappet adjusting spanner. No more chewing the tops off the adjusting screw with a 4'' shifter.
    I'm glad I'm not a trained mechanic! I've never managed to wreck one of the adjusters yet without using the special tool......

    Also using the Eiffel Tower driveshaft tool builds character and strength!!

  14. #14
    1000+ Posts Wildebeest's Avatar
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    Default Renault service tools.

    Quote Originally Posted by Simon
    I'm glad I'm not a trained mechanic! I've never managed to wreck one of the adjusters yet without using the special tool......

    Also using the Eiffel Tower driveshaft tool builds character and strength!!
    Simon,
    You would have to admit that, by now, a lot of the 4cv. R8. R10 etc tappet adj. screws are looking a bit "how's your father?"
    Any way there's nothing better than using the Facom tool as against the "Edward Scissorhands" method.

    Yes, the Eiffel Tower drive shaft tool in action certainly drew a crowd.
    I recall my first time trying to fit a driveshaft boot with this, using grease, silicone etc. I split the first one until reading the manual, the preferred lubricant was auto trans fluid. No trouble after that.

    Continuing on the subject of special tools. There seems to be a macho, red neck attitude among some car, do it yourselfers, about using the right tools.
    I'm not suggesting you need all the bells and whistles but to have a good tool for the job takes away the hero, do it with a coat hanger and elastic from our Val's old knickers aggro of some tasks.

  15. #15
    Simon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildebeest
    Simon,
    You would have to admit that, by now, a lot of the 4cv. R8. R10 etc tappet adj. screws are looking a bit "how's your father?"
    Certainly not on my cars, perhaps my two R4's, the 8 and the 12 have had particularly good PO's.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wildebeest
    Any way there's nothing better than using the Facom tool as against the "Edward Scissorhands" method.
    Actually, now having the Mot tool, I've found that my previous tiny Gedore spanner and a ring spanner works equally as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wildebeest
    Continuing on the subject of special tools. There seems to be a macho, red neck attitude among some car, do it yourselfers, about using the right tools.
    I'm not suggesting you need all the bells and whistles but to have a good tool for the job takes away the hero, do it with a coat hanger and elastic from our Val's old knickers aggro of some tasks.
    I'd agree there. You really can't not have a decent set of tools, and some of the special tools are particularly useful, if not essential, ie a previously mentioned ring nut tool. But overall I suppose being a Renault they do have reliability on their sides too. So fortunately more time can be spent enjoying them than stuffing around with them :-)

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildebeest
    Simon,

    Yes, the Eiffel Tower drive shaft tool in action certainly drew a crowd.
    I recall my first time trying to fit a driveshaft boot with this, using grease, silicone etc. I split the first one until reading the manual, the preferred lubricant was auto trans fluid. No trouble after that.

    coat hanger and elastic from our Val's old knickers aggro of some tasks.
    I bought a pair of those "eiffel towers" at our club Auction along with sundy bits I haven't yet identified I haven't used them yet, but thanks for the tip about lubing the boot with Transmission fluid.

    Don't think my sister Val. would allow me to use her knicker elastic!

    Ken
    Last edited by Kenfuego; 17th March 2005 at 11:33 PM. Reason: minor add

  17. #17
    1000+ Posts Europa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kenfuego
    I bought a pair of those "eiffel towers" at our club Auction along with sundy bits I haven't yet identified I haven't used them yet, but thanks for the tip about lubing the boot with Transmission fluid.
    Castrol rubber grease worked perfectly for me on a R17 driveshaft outer boot recently. You want to be sure your choice of lubricant doesn't deteriorate the rubber...
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  18. #18
    1000+ Posts Wildebeest's Avatar
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    Default Renault service tools.

    Stuey, me old moderator, please delete this if you find it offensive.

    As I mentioned previously, the Eiffel Tower drive shaft boot tool attracted quite a lot of attention.
    For the uninitiated this tool expanded the narrow, 20mm end of the rubber boot to fit over the CV joint, approx. 100 to 120mm?
    Some Renault CV joints could not be separated so this was the only way to fit the new boot.

    As you can imagine, as this task was being performed not a few spectators would arrive, some laying bets the rubber couldn't possibly expand from 20mm to 100mm plus.
    One of the onlookers mentioned on completion that Renault must have done a DNA on a certain part of the female anatomy, handing the results to their supplier to formulate the rubber for the CV boot!

    I'm outta here!

  19. #19
    Fellow Frogger! Ross's Avatar
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    I was given 2 boxes of specialist Renault tools a year or so ago and like you guys I never thought I would use them.

    However when we were building up the new gearbox for the Dauphine I needed to reset all the measurements for the crown wheel and pinion. So I had a look through the boxes and sure enough all the tools were there and very useful they were.

    But I have to agree about the prices this guy wants, far too high. The price I paid was just right.
    Ross:

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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildebeest
    Stuey, me old moderator, please delete this if you find it offensive.

    As I mentioned previously, the Eiffel Tower drive shaft boot tool attracted quite a lot of attention.
    For the uninitiated this tool expanded the narrow, 20mm end of the rubber boot to fit over the CV joint, approx. 100 to 120mm?
    Some Renault CV joints could not be separated so this was the only way to fit the new boot.

    As you can imagine, as this task was being performed not a few spectators would arrive, some laying bets the rubber couldn't possibly expand from 20mm to 100mm plus.
    One of the onlookers mentioned on completion that Renault must have done a DNA on a certain part of the female anatomy, handing the results to their supplier to formulate the rubber for the CV boot!

    I'm outta here!
    Hmmm. I haven't been here for a week, and come back to THIS! I notice no jokes were added about the stretching tool used...

    I recently picked up the Facom tappet tool, but it was for a R16 type motor so the socket part is too big for the R12. I do use the other part (removed) along with a ring spanner, though. I find this a good method for adjustment.

    Stuey


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  21. #21
    Moderator Alan S's Avatar
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    Tell you what; if I owned a diamond car instead of a double chevron, my credit card would be in for a bit of a hammering.

    Have you guys seen these??

    http://cgi.ebay.com.au/ws/eBayISAPI....535341515&rd=1


    http://cgi.ebay.com.au/ws/eBayISAPI....961184651&rd=1

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    http://cgi.ebay.com.au/ws/eBayISAPI....519070463&rd=1

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    And that is only SOME of them

    If it were Cits stuff, I'd be like a kid in a lolly shop.

    Persevere running through and do it quickly as a couple are due to run out very soon.


    Alan S
    If it ain't broke, use a 12" shifter.....that usually does the trick!!

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