Clio camber adjustment
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  1. #1
    Fellow Frogger!
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    Default Clio camber adjustment

    Do Clios have front wheel camber adjustment or is it still the file the hole approach, and what does the funny round nut thing on the top off the strut do?? no its not a retainer(i hope).appreciate your help, regards, Fish.

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  2. #2
    1000+ Posts CHRI'S16's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fish
    Do Clios have front wheel camber adjustment or is it still the file the hole approach, and what does the funny round nut thing on the top off the strut do?? no its not a retainer(i hope).appreciate your help, regards, Fish.
    Fish, im sure this is part of the strut/shock assembly, adjusting Camber on McPhersons isn't too complicated and some companies like K-Mac sell kits for certain cars... but then again? cheers _ Chris
    ... ptui!

  3. #3
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    Fish, the easiest way is to use eccentric bolts that replace the bottom two that connect the strut housing to the hub. You turn the bolts to adjust the camber. I don't know if they're available in Aus. but see here:

    http://www.k-tecracing.com/show_product.asp?id=800

    Stuey

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    Appreciate your advice, wonder how hard it would be to make ones own eccentric mmm

  5. #5
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    Default camber bolts

    Quote Originally Posted by Stuey
    Fish, the easiest way is to use eccentric bolts that replace the bottom two that connect the strut housing to the hub. You turn the bolts to adjust the camber. I don't know if they're available in Aus. but see here:

    http://www.k-tecracing.com/show_product.asp?id=800

    Stuey

    OK Stuey, I looked up your reference and the picture was there, i think between me trusty arc and grinder i can pop a few of those out tomorrow, thanks. ill just weld a sleeve onto a tensile bolt and grind off one side to make an eccentric, fun eh. regards Fish.

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    Just make sure the heat of the welding doesn't reduce the bolt strength!

    By the way, you can get these for EA Falcons (and others) if you want to have a close look at similar designs.

    Stu

  7. #7
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    So where could i get the camber bolts in australia?

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    Quote Originally Posted by spoondc2
    So where could i get the camber bolts in australia?

    actually i realised that their is enough play in the two lower bolts to get more neg camber, i ground the side off one bolt ,the lower, which gave me plenty of movement, just do it up tight, the other side adjusted easy, regards, fish

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    A bit dodgy there, Fish! Bear in mind that these bolts carry the weight of the car, albeit in shear and reduced by the friction between the strut and hub surfaces. They're also hammered directly by undamped/unsprung suspension stresses. Grinding would provide a stress point.

    These bolts are usually a pretty close fit to avoid gross camber changes if the bolt comes slightly loose. The properly made eccentrics are a close fit in the two holes of the strut flange.

    Stuey


    2003 PEUGEOT 206 GTi

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fish
    actually i realised that their is enough play in the two lower bolts to get more neg camber, i ground the side off one bolt ,the lower, which gave me plenty of movement, just do it up tight, the other side adjusted easy, regards, fish
    hehe sorry, i don't get your meaning

  11. #11
    1000+ Posts tekkie's Avatar
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    as Stuey mentioned earlier, these bolts carry not only the static weight of the car but upto 3~4 times its weight in corners not to mention those lovely bumps you hit at various speeds on city roads.

    considering the price of those bolts (available from whitline, noltec, k-mac etc) making your own just seems a tad.... adventureous . the middle part of the bolt does indeed sit very securely in the hub. Its the last thing you want braking when taking a high speed corner.

    there are other negative that can be atributed to camber bolts I have been told about. The main strut no longer is in line with the wheel travel. As a result the shock absorber works at an angle. Two bolts exxagerate the problem. Camber plates do the same for your camber as the bolts but move the whole strut hence retaining the hub/strut geometry.

    .
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by tekkie
    there are other negative that can be atributed to camber bolts I have been told about. The main strut no longer is in line with the wheel travel. As a result the shock absorber works at an angle. Two bolts exxagerate the problem. Camber plates do the same for your camber as the bolts but move the whole strut hence retaining the hub/strut geometry.
    Ahh. Never thought about that one. I think the Ford engineers (the ones originally responsible for their current good dynamics in the European range) termed it 'stiction', coming from 'sticking friction', which causes a jerky motion of the piston rod through the seal at the top of the strut. In turn, damping and handling can be adversely affected.

    Cheers Tekkie

    Edit: just had a think about this. It shouldn't have a big effect on 'stiction' as the wheel doesn't travel vertically on its vertical plane in the case of a MacPherson strut.

    Stuey
    Last edited by Stuey; 13th April 2005 at 12:21 PM.


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  13. #13
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    where's ya sense of adventure, i only shaved it, not like i put a gutter bolt innit, its done 14k since and hasnt moved, i think,mm , better go check,
    the original fit is very loose, so i think that the sheer load is critical but if the bolt is tight, is ok, regards, fisher......i have a spare clio drive train, thinking of putting it in an 8 i have, the electricals are rather daunting tho.


    Quote Originally Posted by Stuey
    A bit dodgy there, Fish! Bear in mind that these bolts carry the weight of the car, albeit in shear and reduced by the friction between the strut and hub surfaces. They're also hammered directly by undamped/unsprung suspension stresses. Grinding would provide a stress point.

    These bolts are usually a pretty close fit to avoid gross camber changes if the bolt comes slightly loose. The properly made eccentrics are a close fit in the two holes of the strut flange.

    Stuey

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by tekkie
    as Stuey mentioned earlier, these bolts carry not only the static weight of the car but upto 3~4 times its weight in corners not to mention those lovely bumps you hit at various speeds on city roads.

    considering the price of those bolts (available from whitline, noltec, k-mac etc) making your own just seems a tad.... adventureous . the middle part of the bolt does indeed sit very securely in the hub. Its the last thing you want braking when taking a high speed corner.

    there are other negative that can be atributed to camber bolts I have been told about. The main strut no longer is in line with the wheel travel. As a result the shock absorber works at an angle. Two bolts exxagerate the problem. Camber plates do the same for your camber as the bolts but move the whole strut hence retaining the hub/strut geometry.


    Do whiteline have camber bolts for clio 172? I saw K-mac and K-tec racing but K-mac cost $110 exc shipping(saids it fits clio but didn't say 172) and k-tec cost $150.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fish
    where's ya sense of adventure, i only shaved it, not like i put a gutter bolt innit, its done 14k since and hasnt moved, i think,mm , better go check,
    the original fit is very loose, so i think that the sheer load is critical but if the bolt is tight, is ok, regards, fisher
    There's a fair bit of leeway left to the imagination with, "I ground the side off one bolt"... Only trying to prevent a catastrophe!


    2003 PEUGEOT 206 GTi

  16. #16
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    you are right, i think I belong to an older school that tends to modify because we didnt have after market bits available, so dont think to look, I dont want a catastrophe neither, regards,Fish


    Quote Originally Posted by Stuey
    There's a fair bit of leeway left to the imagination with, "I ground the side off one bolt"... Only trying to prevent a catastrophe!

  17. #17
    1000+ Posts tekkie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spoondc2
    Do whiteline have camber bolts for clio 172? I saw K-mac and K-tec racing but K-mac cost $110 exc shipping(saids it fits clio but didn't say 172) and k-tec cost $150.
    to check remove your existing bolt, there are two measurements needed.

    diameter, and length of the bolt.
    Once known any bolt that fits the sizing will fit.
    .
    1300cc's of jap buzzbox delivered the times below.

    EC 1:54.6 , Wakefield 1:13.15 , OP (short) 52.00 , OP GP 1:24.40


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