Laguna 2 V6 serpentine belt "how-to"?
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Thread: Laguna 2 V6 serpentine belt "how-to"?

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    Default Laguna 2 V6 serpentine belt "how-to"?

    So, unfortunately, the "simple" repair I made to the alternator has not worked, and I now need to remove/replace the old unit. I have a replacement unit and a new serpentine/drive/auxiliary/whatever-it's-called-these-days belt on its way to me. And, this is for a Laguna 2 V6.

    However, I'm having trouble finding a guide as to how to remove the belt on a V6. I have extracts from the various manuals available, but they're a little vague as to how to slacken and then re-tighten the tensioner. I can see how you need to insert a square-drive socket in the tensioner assembly to swing it down to re-tighten it, but I can't easily see what other bolts need to be loosened to allow the tensioner to slack off in the first place.

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    Does anyone have any experience in this task, and/or a pointer to an interweb resource?

    Thanks in advance!

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    COL
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkR View Post
    So, unfortunately, the "simple" repair I made to the alternator has not worked, and I now need to remove/replace the old unit. I have a replacement unit and a new serpentine/drive/auxiliary/whatever-it's-called-these-days belt on its way to me. And, this is for a Laguna 2 V6.

    However, I'm having trouble finding a guide as to how to remove the belt on a V6. I have extracts from the various manuals available, but they're a little vague as to how to slacken and then re-tighten the tensioner. I can see how you need to insert a square-drive socket in the tensioner assembly to swing it down to re-tighten it, but I can't easily see what other bolts need to be loosened to allow the tensioner to slack off in the first place.

    Does anyone have any experience in this task, and/or a pointer to an interweb resource?

    Thanks in advance!
    There are no other bolts apart from the ones that hold the belt tensioner to the the engine.

    All you do is put the 3/8 drive in the square hole (I use a little extension and a 3/8 ratchet) and move it over center to loosen and reverse to tighten, its that simple.

    Once the tension is taken off the serpentine belt just slips off.
    Regards Col

    1973 Renault R12 Station Wagon
    1976 Renault R12 Station Wagon
    2002 Renault Laguna V6
    1973 Alpine A110

    http://alpine-a110.weebly.com/

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    Hi Mark
    Just a tip as I do not know that engine setup. Make a sketch of the run of the belt and the pulleys FIRST before you do the job. Or even some pics with the phone if possible. You would be amazed how difficult it can be to see how it goes back on again.

    Do not be deceived about how simple it looks and it just will slip on again no worries !! Even experienced people (like MOI) can be caught out if the job drags on and some days later having tried it on several ways and finding it does not fit !!!!!!!!!! Bloody hell how hard can it be Just done that on my sons car and working through the wheel arch on my old knees etc.
    Jaahn

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    Thanks Jaahn, noted!

    Quote Originally Posted by COL View Post
    There are no other bolts apart from the ones that hold the belt tensioner to the the engine.
    Thanks for that, COL! So, to be clear, the bolts on the tensioner assembly do not need to be loosened/re-tightened, it all "swings free", and it's the over-centre location of the tensioner pulley and its spring that tensions the belt? Sorry if I'm being a bit slow/over-cautious, just want to make sure I got that right...

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    Bloody hell how hard can it be
    A question I asked myself when I decided to replace rear bank spark plugs on my V6 Toyota Estima/ Tarago a couple of years ago.

    I ended up removing the rear bank inlet manifold.

    After the job was completed I needed to visit my massage therapist to "untangle" my back and shoulder muscles.

    A case of the mind being willing but body saying no.

    5 year warranty and capped servicing was a priority when our current vehicle was purchased.
    Last edited by robmac; 20th August 2017 at 01:38 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkR View Post
    Thanks Jaahn, noted!



    Thanks for that, COL! So, to be clear, the bolts on the tensioner assembly do not need to be loosened/re-tightened, it all "swings free", and it's the over-centre location of the tensioner pulley and its spring that tensions the belt? Sorry if I'm being a bit slow/over-cautious, just want to make sure I got that right...
    Yes that is correct.
    Regards Col

    1973 Renault R12 Station Wagon
    1976 Renault R12 Station Wagon
    2002 Renault Laguna V6
    1973 Alpine A110

    http://alpine-a110.weebly.com/

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    COL
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    Quote Originally Posted by robmac View Post
    A question I asked myself when I decided to replace rear bank spark plugs on my V6 Toyota Estima/ Tarago a couple of years ago.

    I ended up removing the rear bank inlet manifold.

    After the job was completed I needed to visit my massage therapist to "untangle" my back and shoulder muscles.

    A case of the mind being willing but body saying no.

    5 year warranty and capped servicing was a priority when our current vehicle was purchased.
    There is a lot of us that suffer from those issues Rob. I find lots of stretching and a few rest periods while doing these awkward jobs makes life a bit easier, also a walk around the block helps as well.
    Regards Col

    1973 Renault R12 Station Wagon
    1976 Renault R12 Station Wagon
    2002 Renault Laguna V6
    1973 Alpine A110

    http://alpine-a110.weebly.com/

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    Quote Originally Posted by jaahn View Post
    Hi Mark
    Just a tip as I do not know that engine setup. Make a sketch of the run of the belt and the pulleys FIRST before you do the job. Or even some pics with the phone if possible. You would be amazed how difficult it can be to see how it goes back on again.

    Do not be deceived about how simple it looks and it just will slip on again no worries !! Even experienced people (like MOI) can be caught out if the job drags on and some days later having tried it on several ways and finding it does not fit !!!!!!!!!! Bloody hell how hard can it be Just done that on my sons car and working through the wheel arch on my old knees etc.
    Jaahn
    Good tip Jaahn, Mark should have a diagram of the belt route in those extracts that he has there, if not Mark just drop me a PM with your email and I will email you what you require.
    Regards Col

    1973 Renault R12 Station Wagon
    1976 Renault R12 Station Wagon
    2002 Renault Laguna V6
    1973 Alpine A110

    http://alpine-a110.weebly.com/

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    Quote Originally Posted by COL View Post
    Good tip Jaahn, Mark should have a diagram of the belt route in those extracts that he has there, if not Mark just drop me a PM with your email and I will email you what you require.
    Yep, thanks Col, I have the routing in the extracts. And, I think I'll prolly also take some photos - belt & braces.

    OK, prolly on track to tackle it this weekend, weather permitting. Will post back how I go.

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    OK, so all done. Points to note, from my experience.

    The job is belt off, power steering pump pulley off, A/C compressor off & supported (you don't have to totally remove it), alternator off. Then rinse & repeat to re-assemble. You'll also remove a lot of the engine bay trims along the way, including the under-tray.

    The slacking off of the serpentine belt "feels" odd - to loosen it, you rotate clockwise when facing the engine V - it feels counter-intuitive. I had trouble feeling when it came loose - all of a sudden it was off... Rotating counter-clockwise to re-engage the tensioner had a much more positive feel - a sort of "dull click" and hey presto it was all nicely in place.

    Threading the belt correctly was not too much of a problem - the extracts of manuals I had showed the correct routing quite clearly - no real issues there at all. And, new belt installed as part of the job.

    The old alternator was really stuffed - totally eroded slip-rings on one side. No wonder just changing brushes didn't work...

    And, one of the most "fun" aspects was re-installing the A/C compressor (you have to unbolt/move this to get at the alternator) - two of the bolts and/or their retaining nuts were nigh-on inaccessible. One of them is a nut that has non-rotation flanges on it (so you can tighten it when you get it in place) BUT you can't get it in place!!! I has to resort to what I noticed a previous repairer had done - lightly super-glue the nut in place so that when the compressor was installed (and the nut was inaccessible) you could at least get a couple of threads on the bolt to get it started without the nut falling off.

    I would guesstimate I spent about 4-5 hours on the job, go-to-whoa. This is a combo of me NOT being the world's most experienced mechanic, first time on this job, a coupla cups of coffee and this being a really fiddly job!

    Final note: the original alternator is a 150A jobbie, common on a few PRV V6 motors IIUC. Not sure why the car needs that high an amperage rating. I got quotes for a new one in Oz ranging from $600 to $750 - ouch... I ended up sourcing a rebuilt unit ex-UK for about $260 to my door - 4 days delivery! The one down-side is that they have sent me a 120A unit, which I'm not thrilled about, but I've got to say that even a 120A alternator seems a lot of power for these cars... OK, if you were travelling slowly on a cold foggy night, with fog lights, A/C, demisters and the seat warmers on (which I don't have...) yeah maybe. But I can't see the car burning 150A (or even 120A) on normal daily running. Anyhow, we'll see how it lasts.

    Thanks again to all who provided pointers.

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    Good to see all went well Mark.
    Regards Col

    1973 Renault R12 Station Wagon
    1976 Renault R12 Station Wagon
    2002 Renault Laguna V6
    1973 Alpine A110

    http://alpine-a110.weebly.com/

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkR View Post
    Final note: the original alternator is a 150A jobbie, common on a few PRV V6 motors IIUC. Not sure why the car needs that high an amperage rating. I got quotes for a new one in Oz ranging from $600 to $750 - ouch... I ended up sourcing a rebuilt unit ex-UK for about $260 to my door - 4 days delivery! The one down-side is that they have sent me a 120A unit, which I'm not thrilled about, but I've got to say that even a 120A alternator seems a lot of power for these cars... OK, if you were travelling slowly on a cold foggy night, with fog lights, A/C, demisters and the seat warmers on (which I don't have...) yeah maybe. But I can't see the car burning 150A (or even 120A) on normal daily running. Anyhow, we'll see how it lasts.
    The 150 Amp rating is the maximum output usually achieved at something like 3000RPM to 4000RPM. Your workshop manual will probably tell you the RMP at which this is achieved. At idle it's probably less than half that, again, your manual might tell you the outputs at various RPM. Say, stopped at the lights on a wet night with wipers, AC, lights, stereo, engine fan, etc. going there's not going to be that much in reserve. The alternator only outputs what's required (up to it rating) so too big isn't much of a problem, too little is.
    "I cannot help but notice that there is no problem between us that cannot be solved by your departure. Mark Twain"

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