Renault megane steering lock problem
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Thread: Renault megane steering lock problem

  1. #1
    Tadpole
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    Default Renault megane steering lock problem

    I have a Renault Megane 2003 with a faulty steering lock module. When I place the key card into start the car there is a message on the dash that says steering is locked. I am told this means my lock is broken. I have also been told that the only way I can now remove it is by breaking the lock module unit. Is there a better way of doing it?, has any one had any experience with this problem or removing the unit? I would appreciate any good advice what to do next.

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  2. #2
    Veni Vidi Posti 68 404's Avatar
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    NOTE: Not my work... Cut and pasted from Mike from the long suffering British Megane Owners Club.

    This is about the steering column lock. Enjoy

    *************************************

    I set to and solved the problem in about a minute! (Oh the benefit of hindsight). I removed the lower part of the column shroud (2 small torx screws) thus exposing the steering lock with its left hand threaded single screw T30. I gave it a couple of sharp taps with a hammer and bingo, the steering unlocked! The dulcet tones of the bolt clicking open were music to my ears! Something was stuck inside. I realise this is not a temporary cure but during the last month it has been started many, many times without failure. Daughter has been shown the offending item, supplied with a small hammer and told where to tap if it happens again!

    A few notes.
    1) The steering lock is designed so that it can be removed from the column only when it is UNLOCKED. (What would be the point of a lock if you easily overcome it by removing it??)
    2) When working on the car, the Renault guys use the diagnostic tool to release the lock. However if the lock is faulty, it could be impossible to unlock. Brute force would then be needed with subsequent damage.
    3)Buying a replacement lock from a scrappie would be difficult if for example, the keycard was not present with the vehicle or the car could not be started because of damage or similar. Most likely the whole steering column would be sold with the lock in situ.
    4)New lock would need decoding but this would happen automatically (as per Haynes Manuel.)
    5)The lock is not simply a steel bar moved either way with a simple solenoid. Oh no, it's much more fiendishly clever than that. It contains a small motor with gearing, an internally-threaded rod (which is in fact the bolt), a cam and micro switches (to put it briefly).

    **A second-hand lock can be reset by clearing (to 0xFF) data in the serial EEPROM chip inside.

    Hi again folks! I promised you a sequel to my earlier post and true to my word, here it is! No doubt it will be a long ‘un. Sorry.
    I wrote the previous missive in May. The steering lock behaved impeccably for 6 months and then stuck again. A light tap with the panel pin hammer and it unlocked. It reached the point where it began to stick at least once most days and this forced me “off the fence” to take action. I never did locate an old unit so there was no option but to work on the one in the car. Having examined it carefully, it looked as if the metal cover could be removed, but then what? First problem was to remove the retaining bolt, the one with the left hand thread. The bolt was in fact loose and could neither be tightened nor loosened. Good start! After a lot of pushing and pulling I managed to extract it from the column. Having worked loose, evidently it was sitting at an angle which caused it to bind in the fixing hole in the column bracket.
    With the lock on the workbench it was obvious that the alloy cover could easily be unclipped and removed. When I removed the thicker part surrounding the socket, an odd shaped piece of plastic was forced out by a small spring and dropped onto the bench. I knew at once what this was – heart stopped– a tamper proof device! Curses. The piece of plastic was holding back a hardened metal pin. Once removed, the pin dropped into the lock bolt thus preventing its removal. Had the lock still been on the car, removal would have been impossible by any means other than a lot of brute force and damage! This would happen to anybody attempting to overcome the lock in situ.
    But hey, no problemo, I had the lock in my hand. Look carefully at photo 4. At the top left hand side of the lock is an oblong nylon block which contains the spring that activates the pin (which can just be seen at the bottom of the block). There was no way I could force the pin back (insufficient room) so I drilled out the nylon block and the pin fell out. Phew! I decided I did not need the pin and made the decision not to replace it. When the lock is in place on the column, the block is not accessible – all very secure and fiendishly clever! Incidentally the lock is made by Valeo.
    Now what? The lock mechanism is mounted in what is basically a plastic box held together by plastic clips and easily dismantled. Some of the clips cracked but did not prevent reassembly.
    With the lock mechanism on view I could see how it worked. It resembled a central locking unit, powered by a small motor. The spring that fires the bolt into the column can be seen.
    At this point I found the lock mechanism could be lifted from the case but decided not to risk it at this stage. The electrical contacts were below the mechanism and were not visible. I am sure the bolt could be wound back by turning the gear physically.
    I felt that the original fault was down to either 1) mechanism sticking or 2) poor electrical contact.
    As the lock interior seemed completely dry I took the easy option and gave all the moving parts a light blast of light wax lubricant and reassembled it. Before bolting back in place I reconnected the plug and tested it. Guess what? It worked every time! The LH thread bolt went straight back in.
    Should it play up again, I will take it apart again and dismantle further. I am fortunate in that I am a retired old b****r and my time is not money. Don’t expect your Renault mechanic to attempt this!
    I am pleased to say that I did this work over two weeks ago and the car has been started many times subsequently with no problems. The small hammer is still in the parcel shelf though………
    Have a look at the photos and ask if you have any questions. Have a butcher’s at the lock retaining bolt. It has grooves machined in the shank and when the steering is locked, it is these grooves that prevent the retaining bolt from being removed.
    2008 Renault Laguna 2.0 dCi break
    ​1997 BMW K1200RS

    IR655
    (George Bush Snr): "I'll never apologize for the United States of America. Ever, I don't care what the facts are."


  3. #3
    Veni Vidi Posti 68 404's Avatar
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    You're welcome....

    I guess?

    Dave
    jo proffi and JoBo like this.
    2008 Renault Laguna 2.0 dCi break
    ​1997 BMW K1200RS

    IR655
    (George Bush Snr): "I'll never apologize for the United States of America. Ever, I don't care what the facts are."


  4. #4
    Tadpole
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    Hi chaps, sorry if I'm late to the party but I have the unfortunate scenario of having a jammed steering lock, just wondering if removal can be done without damaging the column or am I relegated to replacing the whole column. If so how would I go about doing so, I do have an angle grinder

  5. #5
    Banned Haakon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by techz View Post
    Hi chaps, sorry if I'm late to the party but I have the unfortunate scenario of having a jammed steering lock, just wondering if removal can be done without damaging the column or am I relegated to replacing the whole column. If so how would I go about doing so, I do have an angle grinder
    removing and replacing the whole column isnt a hard job, just a little time consuming. I've done it a couple of times (for other reasons) and can it out in 20 minutes tops.

  6. #6
    Tadpole
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    It's not so much the effort that concerns me, moreso the cost of a replacement column, however if that's the way it needs to be I guess it is what it is

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